6

I use that dubbing to make flies used in tiny hook sabiki rigs. Just something that will wiggle around the hook to attract plankton feeders. I use these to catch sardines, alewives, menhaden, herrings and also sometimes perch catch well on sabiki rigs. Check your local regs, because some places don't allow sabiki rigs and or limit how many hooks you may have ...


5

From what I understand, the floatation characteristics should be relatively similar since both types of hair contain "chambers" that keep in air and provide floatation. An important difference is how they behave when tied. Deer hair will flare more when wrapped, while the elk hair will tend to remain straighter under the same wrapping conditions. I found ...


4

Yes, those do look like a soft hackle of some kind. I don't know which bird, but as long as they are soft they can be useful for a number of purposes. Globalflyfisher.com has some excellent info on specific fly tying, and their page on soft hackle includes this: Using soft hackle Soft hackle feathers are excellent for several purposes: Soft, ...


4

Answering my own question, it seems to work. The trick is to use the lead/lead-free wire wraps to hold the bead in place. You can stick a few of the wraps inside the bead and turn the slot downwards. A drop of zap-a-gap on the shank, just behind the eye of the hook helps to hold it all in place.


3

You could use it, but it probably wouldn't be very convenient. That fluffy stuff is basically Marabou, which is one of the most popular fly tying materials, the difference between the soft hookless barbs found on your hackles, and the barbs found on semiplumes like Marabou, is the rachis, the shaft of the feather the barbs attach to. You could make use of it,...


3

I am a fly tier and I think that I can tie any fly pattern in large sizes as well as small sizes as you suggest . The only thing that you do is to keep reducing the volume of the materials used to tie the large flies as you move down to the small sizes . I hope that this helps.


2

I've had the most success with the 12 to 16 range. A white or gold bead head chironomid with a red/gold body is my go to for the lake trout in the Pacific Northwest. It's also picked up some smallmouth bass that get curious. Sometimes green/brown patterns work well, too. These are for imitating midge larva and pupa - the largest portion of a lake trout's ...


2

The fly patterns used in modern european nymphing are purposefully simple and effective. The philosophy behind these patterns is to suggest the shape of the insect instead of trying to perfectly match the hatch, and this makes them very versatile as well. Patterns like the tungsten torpedo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyXKOhM9wY0 Or the tungsten ...


1

The easiest fly to tie is probably an egg pattern. The fly requires a hook, high tensile thread, head glue and either a marker or a small amount of flash. This fly may take ~20 minutes the first time tied and can take <5 minutes after tying ~5 flies. It’s a great fly to begin with as you do not need to worry about a multitude of materials and managing ...


1

Elk is a little bit nicer to work with. It lays flatter. I think sika is the best. Sika is a small deer; lovely to work with.


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