30

Here in Slovenia, the use of wild garlic is quite widespread. Although the whole plant, including bulbs, is edible, leaves are most commonly used. I tried only leaves so far, so I can share my experience with only them. Gathering Young, light-green leaves are a bit more aromatic, but smaller; older are darker and larger. I pick a mix of both and look for ...


27

The best advice is not to unless you are very, very sure. Having said that, and just for fun, assuming you are in a chronic survival situation with no choice, this article describes how to test if a plant is edible.


24

Eating berries and mushrooms is not recommended since there is no general pattern to identify poisonous ones (unless you're an expert on that topic). Even having a book with pictures of edible berries can be tricky as some poisonous ones are disguised as their edible counterparts. Plants, on the other hand, should not be edible if the sap is milky. Milky ...


19

Nettles should be blanched to destroy the formic acid before eating (Handle with gloves of course). Bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil & prepare a bowl of ice water on the side. Once the water is boiling, plunge the nettles in the water for no more than a minute or so (the nettles should be bright green & not over cooked). Quickly drain ...


17

I have only had them as a tea with raspberry leaves. Refreshing enough, but nothing I'd actively forage to accomplish. However since the USDA report (direct PDF download) says that stinging nettles are 2.7% protein, and high in a number of vitamins and minerals, I think I'll try using them in a few dishes. Initial collection and preparation for cooking ...


15

If you are referring to Crataegus, then yes Hawthorne is edible, the pomes are like tiny apples with two flower spots on the bottom. It is commonly made into jelly, syrups and country wine. Regarding the seed, you want to pull this out after cooking the pome just like you would the heavy solids of any other fruit. I know you mention raspberry and black ...


14

Any cloth bag with a loose weave will also work. Closely woven bags are a second good choice, but won't breathe as well. Part of the reason for a basket, though, is that you'll also have a lot of structural support, and the goods will have less crushing, bumping, and bruising. You can use plastic fruit containers that have built in drainage and air holes ...


13

Conifers are your friend here - they have a sticky sap which can be used as the base ingredient for a natural glue. It hardens relatively quickly on exposure to air and in its solid form is quite easy to store without sticking to everything, so if you have this in mind it's a good idea to collect some as you see it. When you've got your pitch (the hardened ...


13

Get a good book, with full color illustrations. I can't find a link for one, but you want quality equivalent to the Audubon full color field guides. Do a few field runs in the area you plan on being in with someone experienced before you try to eat the foliage. Of course, everything depends on risk. If you've been lost for four or five days and you'...


13

Foraging is NOT looking at a plant and deciding if it's edible, nor is it looking in a book at a plant and then going looking for that plant. It's not possible to learn all the plants and it's not possible that all the plants will be in the area you forage. Foraging is about confidently identifying some edible plants. The two main components of this ...


13

Pine needle tea is a good solution which is available year round in areas where pines grow. Do be careful to identify properly, and take care to not guzzle the stuff down... too much is bad for you. However this is the easiest to find and pine needle tea has a ton of vitamin C. Dandelion greens are plentiful in many areas and good for vitamin C, though I ...


12

Using some numbers from Cornell's Extension program: 10 gallons of sap per tap in a season is reasonable. The length of a season varies- Let's say it's 90 days. The sugar concentration, which influences how much syrup you get from a given volume of sap, varies. Let's assume 2%, which means you need 43 gallons of sap to get 1 gallon of syrup. So three taps ...


11

All types of berries are your answer here! Pretty much any (edible) variety contains a large amount of vitamin C - blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries for instance. (Blackberries and raspberries seem to be especially prevalent at the right time of the year here in the UK.) And they're tasty too. Of course, it goes without saying if you're ...


11

(TL:DR -- The "safe" amount to harvest varies enormously with plant species and context. When in doubt, take 5% or less. 1/3 is probably safe for common, prolific species.) This rule is given out because if you harvest every fruit on a plant, you've stopped it from reproducing this year. You don't necessarily even have to harvest all the fruit, if the plant ...


10

First things first you need to contact the correct authorities. You require written permission to trap crayfish in the UK. There was an episode of River Cottage where they trapped them on the River Kennet. The Gov website doesn't list where you can or cannot trap signals, as you need landowners and angling club permission to trap on our lakes and rivers. ...


10

There is one poisonous: the Desmarestia. The other species should be okay. However, I can't say anything about if they are "worth eating" :) Desmarestia is a genus of brown algae found worldwide. Members of this genus can be either annual or perennial. Annual members of this genus can produce and store sulfuric acid in intracellular vacuoles. When ...


9

Foraging is actually really easy in the UK, there are plenty of easy start plants and berries you can look for. Do you require anything specific to start doing this? Realistically, no not at all, as some plants you can forage in your own back garden. However, it's a good idea to get yourself a decent reference book - we brought the Collins pocket guide ...


9

Sugar Maple trees are by far the most popular trees that people tap for sap. So I will use this as my example of how to tap a tree. The following is taken from: Common Sense Homesteading. Identify Maple Trees and Wait for the Right Temperature Range. There are many species of maple trees. The sap gathered from all of them can be boiled down into ...


9

Protected species in sweden are listed in English here: Protected Species in Sweden. Since information is subject to change I will not copy the information into this answer. Apart from that, hunting and fishing is regulated. Naturally, anything grown commercially is off limits too, since that is the property of the land owner. Note that National Parks/...


8

I have good experiences using cloth grocery bags (note: breathability). Depending on how many mushrooms you are gathering it might be necessary to put something like a bowl/small basket into the bottom of the bag to keep the mushrooms from getting squished by the downwards pull of the bag.


8

If you are eating fruits like these, you aren't eating true almonds. These are tropical almonds, Terminalia catappa, and the entire fruit and nut are edible.


8

There are a few ways to tap a tree, before you tap you need to know when the sap is rising from the roots to the branches. I have read about use a knife to make a shallow cut under the bark, then using a twig to guide the flow into a positioned bottled using a drill bit to achieve the same effect The blade/drill should only penetrate to the layer where ...


8

I usually combine the two answers above- pick into a container, when done transfer the berries one by one to a strainer. Get rid of anything suspicious. Wash thoroughly with cold water, if needed let the berries sit in a bowl with water for a few minutes and rinse again.


7

There are many sources of vitamin C in the wild. Some of the tricks that I have come across is to know how to extract it in ways that do not destroy the vitamin C. Berries are great in vitamin C and may be eaten raw. However there are a great variety of other sources of vitamin C in the wild. Let’s take a look at a few wild sources of vitamin C from ...


7

This is a good place to start: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's nettle recipes. Nettle Soup Adapted from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall Around 150g nettle tops 30-35g knob of butter 1 onion, peeled chopped 1 large or 2 smallish leeks, trimmed, washed and finely sliced 2 celery sticks, chopped 1 clove garlic, peeled and chopped 2 tbsp ...


7

The best time of year in the UK to go foraging for sloes is from mid-October to early-November, with the best time being after the first frost in this time frame. Allowing a frost will help the berries be less tough - their skins should burst slightly. Some people say don't worry about the frost and just stick them in the fridge or freezer - but from ...


7

I enjoy going out every year and picking wild fruits out here in Beautiful British Columbia. Many times a year, I will go out picking berries, early in the morning with a friend if possible. My favorite place to go berry picking is down near the Fraser River. I tend to make it a multitask day, by picking other berries at the same time and have even done ...


6

Rumex includes both sorrels and docks. The sorrels are generally more widely eaten. You can eat all of them, although they're pretty acid. Sliced finely with other salad greens, they add some bite. You can also wilt them down as you would spinach for a risotto or soup. http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/rice-recipes/a-beautiful-sorrel-risotto-with-crumbled-...


6

Wild garlic is perfectly edible. My usual ways of cooking it are either to eat it raw (after washing) as a salad leaf, or to saute it like spinach (and it will reduce by a similar amount). It can either be cooked on its own, or mixed with spinach. The only caveat I have is that some people find that eating a lot (2 x similar portion of spinach) may have a ...


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