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32

Actually, it is often the opposite--many fords which are fine for humans are unsafe for a horse and rider, because the ground is too rocky, or the area is too narrow or steep, or the ford relies on some tool like stepping stones or a safety rope that the horse can't use. On the other hand, horse-safe fords can be muddier and deeper than those meant for ...


19

Horses are bigger and stronger and than humans and because of the square cube law, they have more mass to surface area which makes them better suited to fording deeper/faster rivers. As to whether or not you could cross where the horses do, that will depend on the individual crossing. You probably couldn't cross at all of the places horses can, but that ...


11

The whole thing comes down to weight, if your setup can displace more than its weight then it will float, those jeeps were made to be very light. You could be in the situation where your "wrapped car" could float but its so deep in the water you wont be able to move it anywhere (or you would need an huge canvas and a mean to hold it in deep water as much as ...


10

I think the best answer to this question is going to be It Depends Even if it's not glacier fed, the melting snow of ice could have an impact and increase the water flow during the afternoon. The effect could be affected by the distance from the source, if any dams are upstream, and the time of year. Some river flows are monitored with gauges and the ...


8

From The U.S. National Weather Service, Turn Around Don't Drown® Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other thunderstorm related hazard. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that over half of all flood-related drownings occur when a vehicle is driven into hazardous flood water. The next highest ...


8

Ok to address your question: Can I use a plastic blue tarp to float my vehicle over water? Yes Limits and Considerations: WILL YOU FLOAT? First off I will describe the physics of the floating car. The force of buoyancy acting on your car must be greater than the force of gravity pulling it down. The equation for buoyancy is this . Where Fb is the force ...


7

Based solely on the video you provided the link to, and my experience with blue thick tarp, I have a few things to address. I don't know what kind of tarpaulin you have, how heavy your vehicle is, and how deep is the river/pond/lake you're trying to cross through. Despite that, there are a few things you should keep in mind. You should make sure that your ...


6

As it happens, the easiest way to cross from the north is on the ice of the Þjórsarjökull glacier. The glacier in this area is almost completely flat. There are very few crevasses or other features, and those that do exist are shallow and easily visible. Þjórsárjökull is the lowest part of Hofsjökull, at the eastern end, getting nearly down to 600 metre. ...


6

The presence of a ford in a river is a local condition: it's a point in the flow where the river has leveled out, producing a wide, slow, shallow flow. In addition, a ford generally has a hard bottom, either naturally or through "improvement" with imported gravel. The presence of a ford at one point says absolutely nothing about the fordability of that ...


5

How do people cross fast flowing rivers without a dedicated wading staff? I can answer this only for Colorado and California. You find a place where you can cross safely, given your strength and balance. This may mean a significant detour. First, for below timberline: Scout upstream and downstream for a log that has fallen across the stream. You ...


4

I live in New Zealand, land of many rivers. Whether a river is crossable depends completely on depth and flow rate. Whether a horse or 4WD could cross it is irrelevant, because the flow rate and depth vary depending on rainfall in the high country 2-12 hours ago. I've seen river crossings that can vary from "Where's the water?" (because it's flowing ...


4

In addition to previous answers: Consider the center of mass. The "modern" car usually are quite front heavy (quite often the engine, gearbox, clutch etc. are all in the front) in contrary to the depicted jeeps. That means a "modern" car will by no means float as level as the depicted one, even if you have enough lift.


2

I've crossed a lot of fast flowing creeks and rivers in the Canadian Rockies, some deeper than my waist. The technique I use, and teach others to use, is to walk facing upstream, and walk sideways, leaning into the flow of water. It ultimately comes down to balance and how sure your footing is, I grew up crossing glacier fed rivers this way, so it was ...


2

If your tarp is heavy duty enough, I'd expect it to work. Most blue plastic tarps are fairly thin and weak, so while it might work, it would be risky. The difficulty is that you will be abrading the tarp by driving onto it, probably subjecting it to abrasion from rubbing against the jeep's body, and risking the tarp catching on underwater debris. The ...


1

Anecdotally, I once walked alone from Chandra Tal, in the Spiti valley in northern India, to Baralach La, where I took a bus to Leh. There was a trail that went along a large river, but there were fast-flowing mountain streams that fed into it. I was cautious because I was alone, and these streams distressed me greatly. Each day I encountered a stream - ...


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