34

Option 2 is better, as activating your PLB will divert resources that could be used to fight the forest fire, and put other people in unnecessary danger (PLBs aren't a get out of danger free card). Fires rarely go above tree line, Alpine tundra areas in the [Colorado] San Juans rarely burn because, according to Korb, they are typically sparse in fuel, ...


32

In addition to what the other answer says, a fire burning near a crag could weaken bolts; so if there is fire damage anywhere nearby, the bolts should be considered suspect and replaced (at least the anchors). As for the rock itself, I'd approach it like a new crag that has not been climbed before, i.e. expect holds to come loose and be prepared for ...


25

Your question answers itself - "above timberline" indicates very little, if any, fuels for the fire, so the best option (assuming no life-threatening issues) is to stay put. As others have mentioned, forest fires move rapidly, so you'll be able to descend at some point. Also fires are heavily monitored by a wide variety of wildland firefighters, so you may ...


25

A forest fire can definitely affect the rocks and cause hazards (in addition to the hazards in the forest). Hot burning fires destabilize rock. This can result in removal of rock coatings, flaking, scaling, and/or abrasion. Source Spall is flakes of a material that are broken off a larger solid body and can be produced by a variety of mechanisms, ...


25

IMO the best solution right now is not to go. I live in the PNW, and I'm simply avoiding strenuous exercise until air quality improves. I wouldn't enjoy hiking with a mask on, and it's unhealthy to exert oneself with these air quality levels. I had a hike planned for this weekend which I called off due to the fire and air quality situation, and that same day ...


20

There is a definitely a risk of starting a fire with a flare gun, for this reason they are discouraged by the National Park Service (at least in Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument). Not Useful: Cell phones do not have service in the monument Flares are not always visible to pilots flying overhead during hours of sunlight or in heavy overcast skies. ...


18

If you are not threatened there is no reason to activate your PLB. See How bad do circumstances need to be before activating a PLB? It is a forest fire, there may be people who are actually at risk for their lives, activating your PLB where there is no real risk to your party, may cause the diversion of resources, that result in loss of life to others. ...


14

As far as the danger from hotspots, it looks like it could be a while, A municipal leader in British Columbia's central Interior says he wouldn't be surprised if wildfires that have chewed through more than 10,600 square kilometres of woodland smoulder until 2018. Chairman Al Richmond of the Cariboo Regional District said hot spots from many of the ...


13

A forest fire moves fairly rapidly (like 6-10 mph). Once it consumes the vegetation it goes out. If you stack a fire pit at best it will burn for a day. Just wait a day or two and walk out. Yes there will be some smoldering trunks and roots. In a large remote fires hot shot crews will protect home by home and let the fire pass.


13

RETREAT Your option 2 is best, but having said that, rescue crews will want to know you're out there sooner than later. In the option 1 you described, you would be activating your PLB, then waiting for rescue above the treeline. Fire doesn't go very far above treeline, but smoke, ash, embers and heat do. Just because you're above the treeline doesn't mean ...


12

Basically it increases the runoff in a number of ways, less soil cover in the form of vegetation, ash blocking the water from being absorbed, and in some cases a hydrophobic water coating can be left behind. Loss of vegetation exposes soil to erosion; water runoff may increase and cause flooding; sediments may move downstream and damage houses or fill ...


8

I'm literally in the thick of the smoke right now, fires are burning a half hour upwind of me, and ash has been falling from the sky like snow. Just this past couple weeks the government has been shutting down the backcountry to all access. The nearby National Park just issued a voluntary evacuation order, and they're talking about upping it to a mandatory ...


7

Yes Charlie's answer is excellent, but to append some technical information from my background as a civil engineer may be helpful. When evaluating stormwater impacts for a site, there's generally 3 key criteria: runoff rate, water quality, and groundwater recharge. Runoff rate is what it sounds like and is a function of the time of concentration, which ...


6

I'd like to caution against returning to recently burned areas for recreational purposes. Give it a year or two for vegetation to return. Traveling, even by foot, could cause irreparable damage when the rainy season comes. Even without your help, the root structure is severely weakened. Paths made on hillsides can quickly become water channels that ...


6

Flares ignite at 191 °C (376 °F) and burn as hot as 1,600 °C (2,900 °F). This makes them incredibly dangerous since they are well above the ignition temperature of most flammables found in a forest or wildland. My experience firing a parachute flare such as a Pains-Wessex at sea level, the air is thicker and they tend to hit the ground unlit. Further in ...


6

According to United States Forest Service, fire has a number of benefits for the wildlife including more nutrients in the ground, more open spaces, there are some plants that need fire to spread and it helps control invasive species. Fire offers many benefits to wildlife and plant species. First and foremost, a fire is a natural process, unlike mowing or ...


5

If there were a huge amount of heat, you might actually have to consider the hydrological issues. All mountains, hills, etc., have a water table. Steam can exert extreme pressures, enough to fracture many types of rock. Additionally, as the water warms, some minerals are going to become more soluble in it, which could cause internal erosion. If the ...


5

A vivid description of this is described in "Young Men & Fire" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Young_Men_and_Fire Early 50's Forest service is developing smoke jumpers. At the time teams didn't train together as a team. They drop into the Mann Gulch fire, above it. Their plan was to come down the gulch opposite the fire, cross over and fight it from ...


4

There is a huge high pressure ridge (588+DAM) that has been parked over a good share of the Intermountain West (centered in various parts of the Great Basin) all summer. Storms that ride over the ridge to the north and then come down on the east side of the clockwise circulation will be where the rainfall occurs. The smoke itself if anything will contain ...


4

Fire was used in traditional mining to ease breaking the rock into smaller pieces. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire-setting So, it is this once desirable effect what makes it now dangerous for you to go climbing there.


4

Now that parts of the Park have been reopened, I've learned that there are several answers to this question. In the case of "when is it safe", the answer is essentially, "when the fire is out". There will still be hazards however: There may be hot spots, or hot coals smoldering underground. Falling trees and rock slides are a hazard, as the fire will also ...


3

Drought. The BC Wildfire Service has an interactive map that shows every reported fire in BC and it's suspected cause. Most of them are ignited by lightning, but it's the unusually dry season, high temperatures and wind that are the cause for the spread of the wildfire. Back home on Kootenay Lake we used to sit out on the deck and watch lighting hit the ...


3

This report from the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America says that in the years between 1992 to 2012 humans were the cause of 84% of wildfires and 44% of the total area burned. Additionally, Human-started wildfires were dominant (>80% of ignitions) in over 5.1 million km2, the vast majority of the United States, whereas ...


3

One of the significant causes of fires being major or large is fire suppression. The initial cause of the fire is incidental. They are major because the amount of fuel available is high. Forest fires are natural events, forest evolution grew to depend on them happening at intervals and being allowed to burn without interference. To partially address the ...


3

They probably will burn, see this one for example, Image Source Also wood has a higher ignition temperature. Sometimes they are in metal boxes on metal posts, but quite often they are wood or metal boxes on top of wood posts. Also, They don't always have paper. The paper doesn't always have space for new entries. People forget to sign them. People ...


3

With training and while accompanied by experienced people, you can safely enter the burned area of a forest fire, while the fire is still burning. There is an entire career field dedicated to the practice it is called 'Wildland Firefighting' and in the US alone about 10,000 people are employed by the National Forest service Additionally there are multiple ...


1

I was about to write a long essay on how strange the Norwegian rules regarding rights-of-every-man and the department of safety and readiness but I realized you are just asking where to find the information. This is usually not a judgement that is made at the nation level - it is made by each municipality or city council. So you'll normally expect to find ...


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