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37

When I was a boy I learned about a tribe of natives (Lipan Apache) that had an initiation into manhood which involved plucking a hair from the tail of a live deer. These people had developed a mode of stealth that allowed them to walk right up to deer–head on–without the deer sensing their presence or noticing their advance. I adopted the technique for ...


33

I'll answer this from a perspective of what we follow in some of the areca nut and coconut farms that I've grown up in. The areca nut and coconut trees shed their branches often. These are similar to the dead wood that you are speaking of in the woods. These too are a nuisance when it comes to walking around. So what we do is to move these to the base of ...


30

Here in Slovenia, the use of wild garlic is quite widespread. Although the whole plant, including bulbs, is edible, leaves are most commonly used. I tried only leaves so far, so I can share my experience with only them. Gathering Young, light-green leaves are a bit more aromatic, but smaller; older are darker and larger. I pick a mix of both and look for ...


24

These dot the woods near my house (Eastern United States), where children construct them as play forts. I suspect this activity has worldwide appeal.


22

The first solution that comes to mind is a "zeer", or pot-in-pot refrigerator. However, this functions best in hot and dry environments as it relies on evaporation to work. Such a device is constructed by nesting one clay pot inside another, with a layer of sand between them (about an inch on the bottom, a few inches on the sides). The sand is then soaked ...


22

The pool of water they are in is called a vernal pool. Amphibians and other woodland creatures take advantage of these temporary pools while they last. Not having anything for scale in the picture, they appear to be salamander eggs similar to those shown on this site:


15

I think a list of dangers is potentially useful, but not a "single answer" question so I'm going to make this a CW -- Add your stuff here: Hypothermia Dehydration Hyperthermia/heat stress/heat stroke Falls leading to mechanical injury or head trauma Getting lost and dying of dehydration/starvation Water born illness through drinking tainted water (...


14

The answer seems to be that it depends, Birds, small mammals, and other wildlife use snags for nests, nurseries, storage areas, foraging, roosting, and perching. Live trees with snag-like features, such as hollow trunks, excavated cavities, and dead branches can provide similar wildlife value. Snags occurring along streams and shorelines eventually may ...


13

Although technology has brought us many conveniences most of them require supporting power or other technology. You seem set on refrigeration and you say: "I am willing to go to just about any extent short of buying a fridge and a generator." Perhaps you should consider solar panels (photovoltaic) and an electric refrigerator. Both technologies are ...


13

No, a "national forest" here in the US is a legal designation and does not mean the land is actually covered with trees (a forest). In the US, there are quite a number of governmental divisions that own and manage land that is open to the public to various degrees. Sticking just to the larger federal ones, there is BLM land (Bureau of Land Management), ...


12

Were there fruit trees nearby? I ask because here (South Germany) the old-style apple trees grow really big, and in autumn they have such masses of fruit that the branches can break off under the weight. So they keep those sticks leaning on the trees, and in autumn they get wedged under the long branches so they don't break. The modern apple plantations for ...


12

That looks like the spine and pelvis of a raccoon: . Although the raccoon is not native to Germany, they were introduced there in the 1930s and can be found in the wild. The map below shows raccoons killed or found dead 2001-2003. So while it's highly unlikely that you stumbled across the remains of a raccoon, it is possible. See wikipedia for more ...


12

Using some numbers from Cornell's Extension program: 10 gallons of sap per tap in a season is reasonable. The length of a season varies- Let's say it's 90 days. The sugar concentration, which influences how much syrup you get from a given volume of sap, varies. Let's assume 2%, which means you need 43 gallons of sap to get 1 gallon of syrup. So three taps ...


10

For any reasonable depth (ie. something you'd be willing to dig without specialized machinery), a deeper hole makes for a more stable temperature. The extra mass of soil surrounding your cellar acts to average out temperature changes: shallow burial averages out day-night shifts, while deeper averages out seasonal changes as well. The end result is that a ...


10

For the purpose of my answer I'm going to assume there aren't any special considerations like a tall tree on a small lot. In general I think this is the best procedure: Cut down one tree. Trim off all the branches. Build a big pile of small branches that aren't useful for firewood. a. Load this stuff into a trailer and dispose of it as appropriate when ...


10

I live an area where a lot of the woods was farms a hundred years ago. 50 years ago it was bushy fields, now it's heavily wooded with increasingly narrow cart paths running through it. A lot of the stuff I run into was probably dumped by someone creating a dump site a few decades ago, when you could drive to it with no problem, but if you see it today, it's ...


9

I think the most likely is actually hypothermia. All it takes is being a little unprepared and getting caught in wet and windy conditions a little above freezing. If you don't deal with that right away, things just deteriorate and then dealing with it properly gets less and less likely until you're unable to deal with anything at all. I'd say number 2 is ...


9

In the woods, there are many small items that can fall from above that are more or less awkward to have on your head. This goes from leaves and needles on the "not very harmful" side over water droplets (during or after the rain) to ugly things like bird poop. One characteristic that makes a hat as depicted in your question preferable over other headdresses ...


9

While that construction has no shelter currently, Scouts and other outdoors groups will often make a frame like you describe, and then cover those branches with leaves, moss or even a tarp in order to provide a shelter. Using the tree trunk gives a solid support for this sort of thing, and often the tree itself provides some shelter from its own branches.


9

Sugar Maple trees are by far the most popular trees that people tap for sap. So I will use this as my example of how to tap a tree. The following is taken from: Common Sense Homesteading. Identify Maple Trees and Wait for the Right Temperature Range. There are many species of maple trees. The sap gathered from all of them can be boiled down into ...


9

Protected species in sweden are listed in English here: Protected Species in Sweden. Since information is subject to change I will not copy the information into this answer. Apart from that, hunting and fishing is regulated. Naturally, anything grown commercially is off limits too, since that is the property of the land owner. Note that National Parks/...


8

Hats are great for many reasons. They keep sun off your head, they retain heat when it's cold. They help keep small stuff from hitting your head and sometimes your face. A branch may knock your hat askance rather than scratch your face up or even poke you in the eye. It can keep that same branch from getting tangled in your hair. A hat is just another layer ...


8

That is cause by clearcut timber harvesting. Timber harvesters will remove branches from trees that they fell and leave them on site. They will also sometimes leave specimen trees to help repopulate the area - or leave undesirable individual trees or species. The standing trees might also be the result of a weak implementation of a clearcut with reserve.


8

There are a few ways to tap a tree, before you tap you need to know when the sap is rising from the roots to the branches. I have read about use a knife to make a shallow cut under the bark, then using a twig to guide the flow into a positioned bottled using a drill bit to achieve the same effect The blade/drill should only penetrate to the layer where ...


8

A few suggestions for reducing the likelihood of an incident: Sleep in clearings. Avoid the forest during heavy winds. Avoid sleeping under large branches: even when the tree looks healthy. I have witnessed the aftermath of century old drought-stressed but otherwise healthy California live oaks losing giant branches. A heavy snow load increases the ...


8

Fastening the lamp further down (eg, chest, waist) generally provides better perception of trail features and makes it easier to wear a headnet. If the light source is above your eyes, you won't be able to see the shadows cast by trail obstructions as well to judge their height/distance. If the light is below your eyes, roots and rocks would cast a shadow ...


8

You're building up a huge fire hazard. Normally fires would've cleaned that out, but fire suppression for 40 years has left you with a lot of fuel. Which may make for a really bad fire. Destroying forest, as well as structures. Removing that dead wood will be taking out nutrients from the ecosystem (as well as costly in labor and time). Reducing Fire ...


8

Herbivore faeces doesn't smell as much as human faeces (or dog/cat/other carnivore). The vast majority of mammals, by number or mass, are herbivores. Population densities of large herbivores (overall - we often go to see them where they gather in large numbers, but they don't spend long in one place then, or they'll run out of food) are much lower in the ...


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