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36

TLDR: Foxes do not attack humans. So you can go there day and night. To me this sounds more like a spooking story than reality. Foxes hunt very small animals, humans are way too big for them. Anyway, in their natural habitat they are extremely shy and will run away from you most likely before you are even aware of its presence. Foxes with rabies can lose ...


14

Urban red foxes have been known to be a tad vicious or territorial and attack people... but it is not a common occurrence by any means, usually it's due to the fox having gotten itself into a cornered situation, they then act as any wild animal will and potentially strike. There is always the odd news story of a fox getting into a house, and attacking people....


11

It sounds like they were telling tales, possibly for your own good. Exploring by night can be extremely dangerous, for reasons that have nothing to do with foxes. Tripping, falling, or just plain walking into a tree are very real dangers. Foxes, however, are not[1]. They do hunt in small family groups (a skulk, not a pack), but target prey like mice. ...


8

Question: Are we even perhaps able to help it (even if it means "kill it")? The only way to help a rabid fox, or any rabid animal, is to kill it. If you have a gun -- and know how to use it -- kill the rabid fox. It is the humane thing to do for the fox, and protects other people whom the fox might harm if you just got yourself away or drove it away. But ...


8

Because of the extremely high "Fear Factor" this subject engenders, I want to carefully examine the threat of contracting rabies from a different but still extremely vital angle: The engendered rabies threat from a fox bite is admittedly over-rated; as it now stands, it can be construed to be more of a "psychological," rather than "physical," danger. I am ...


7

This site says that it has to do with food. Foxes are drawn into houses by the availability of food. They will take advantage of open windows, doors, and pet flaps to come inside and wreak havoc. The pests makes messes of kitchens as they forage for fish, meats, fruits, vegetables, and even garbage. Source This fox in London was apparently a gamer, A ...


4

Once rabies symptoms appear it is generally considered beyond the window for treatment, at least in humans (see: http://www.cdc.gov/rabies/symptoms/index.html). As ab2 said in their answer, if you have a gun and know how to use it you could kill the animal, putting it out of its misery. For humans who are 'past the point of no return' the treatment is more ...


3

I am not a Rabies expert - but I have very slightly more 1st hand experience than most people. Some years ago I was bitten by a guard dog in China (we were playing). My hosts were aghast, for reasons that made no sense to me. They took me to hospital. It was only when I saw the Rabies medication that I understood. The dog was never likely to have Rabies (...


2

Stop removing the poop. If you are tired of removing it think how the fox feels about having to replace it! The fox is marking their territory and you keep removing the marks. Per your updated answer you are fine with sharing the patio with the fox. Let the fox know it as well, leave the poop. In scent marking, the fox patrols the boundary areas of its ...


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