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27

It is apparently not safe, among the poor today who have to use it as they have no alternatives, it leads to all sorts of health problems. It is also a worse polutant than burning wood. On the reverse side of the environmental equation, raw biomass is known to emit a number of particulates as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Burning solid ...


25

I'd try and be more specific towards the kind of the fuel we are talking about: White Gas / Naphtha Burns clean without any smell and/or effect on food taste. Accidental Spilling of the fuel is not much to be worried about. Evaporates very quickly, without leaving an odor. That said, make a note that the spilled fuel is very flammable White gas is safer to ...


21

This is rare. I have a BS in chemical engineering, worked in natural gas transportation, and went to fire school at Texas A&M. Natural gas is mainly methane. It is odorless and colorless. It is lighter than air and disperses fairly rapidly. Mercaptan (odor) is only added when the natural gas goes into retail distribution. Propane is also odorless ...


14

Below a list of common camping fuels and their translated names. Please do leave a comment and/or edit this answer if you think there are errors or if you can fill the gaps or provide more information. Note that some of the listed substances are not frequently used as fuel, but I think listing them can be useful to avoid misunderstandings. White Gas (US ...


12

When I cook home-dehydrated food, I often rehydrate for a day - but not on the stove. In the morning, I boil water for coffee, pour some over dehydrated meat in a Nalgene, leave the lid on loosely until the water is only warm, then tighten the lid firmly. It spends the day in the pack and by dinner time the meat is rehydrated. For some vegetables, such as ...


12

While writing the question, I've figured out an answer. I just burn the fuel in the stove. Maybe this little knowledge would be helpful.


12

There are a couple of reasons why you can't use alcohol or acetone: A petrol/gasoline/kerosene/diesel etc. stove needs the fuel to be vapourised, under pressure and mixed with air for it to burn (cleanly/efficiently). Alcohol doesn't. You can burn it cleanly in an open cup, though designs with a ring of jets work well; these are different to the jet plus ...


10

I was recently in Mexico and bought some unleaded gas at a gas station as stove fuel. I gave the unused fuel away to a taxi driver to put in his car. I suspect the same thing would work fine with the fuels sold as "white gas" or "camp fuel." I've heard conflicting information about exactly how this stuff is formulated, and for all I know it depends on the ...


9

There are four common types of stove alcohol: methanol, ethanol, denatured alcohol, and isopropanol. You can usually find them in hardware stores and (but not always) in camping stores. You can also get it as gas line antifreeze in automotive stores but be careful to read the label because antifreeze also comes in several other forms. Methanol Methanol is ...


8

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


7

Here are a few methods If you have a lawnmower or weed eater you can dilute your gas by about 5% to 10% with it and burn it off that way, even if the fuel is 'bad'. Additionally, many fire departments will accept all manner of fuel, good or bad, and use it for backburning areas preparing for the summer fire season. Some auto parts stores will accept fuel ...


7

A third option to Russell Steen's excellent two is: To Refill: There are adapters (from G-Works and Alva, amongst others) that will let you refill them using either other butane canisters, larger 16oz propane canisters, as well as the small aerosol-cans of butane that you can get at Asian markets. Adventures in Stoving has a nice article of refilling ...


6

Most things I can think of would stop it working even when full. My one suggestion is, is the pump below the fuel line when on its side? The fuel line is the white tube in the picture. If it is in the middle of the bottle and the fuel is low it might not be submerged when the bottle is horizontal. Have you tried putting the bottle vertically or rotating it?...


5

In general 'lighter' fuels with less additives will mean that the stove needs less cleaning. Most of the reason I've needed to clean a stove is from additives which don't burn properly (particularly when igniting the stove) can can block the nozzle and things. For this reason compressed gas (not gasoline) is probably best, followed by Coleman fuel (white ...


5

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


5

No alcohol - because these use a vapour phase to burn, this is best achieved by evaporation from the surface of the fuel under the heat generated by burning. Pressurizing alcohol based fuels results in a flame-thrower is my understanding. It depends on the jet you have - larger jets for fuels with low vapour pressure generally. Kerosene is heavy-chain ...


4

Your bottle will just contain LPG. The problem you may have is the connector for filling up. This is non standard across countries and so you may require an adapter. adapters: https://www.alibaba.com/showroom/gas-cylinder-adapter.html stations in romania: https://www.mylpg.eu/stations/romania/ how to refill: https://youtu.be/eyRwM2WJm6I more info: https:...


4

Martin's answer is good. Adding a few tidbits: Most alcohol stoves will burn other alcohols. Denatured alcohol usually refers to ethanol with an agent added that makes it undrinkable. The 3 carbon alcohols (propanols) also burn well. Iso-propanol is often marketed as rubbing alcohol. Read the label: Often comes as 70%, 90% and 99% alcohol. Higher ...


4

There are several methods, one is adding water. The thinking is this: the alcohol should be at about 75% alcohol, and denatured alcohol sold in the US already has some water in it, or other compounds depending on its intended use (or of the means by which it is denatured). So, if you're not good at math, add H₂O and experiment. Otherwise, use the actual ...


4

This (Jetboil Crunchit Recycling Tool) was found by googling "crush isobutane fuel can" and reading this second result (right below the outoors.SE question) for the link.


4

I would under no circumstances store your white gas stove that way. White gas is pretty volatile stuff and the increased chance of a leak is just not worth it. In addition, why? I am not sure what benefit this would provide. Yes, it is safe to store partially filled white gas canisters. I would not leave them in direct sunlight with hot temperatures ...


4

If you are not specifically looking for a liquid fuel thing: I always fantasized about making one such thing. But I have never tried. Get a tin Make something that looks like below. Advantages: Tins are easy to find and so are those solid fuel tablets If you break it, worst case you will be at loss of money worth a burger and time worth an afternoon nap.


4

In the UK many petrol stations (which, BTW have some of the longest opening hours of any retailers, especially on Sundays) say minimum 2 litres, some minimum 5. There are rules about the type of container you can fill; the one your bottle might not meet is simply labeling. Years ago it wasn't unknown to fill a 1 litre bottle and pay for 2 litres, but on ...


3

My personal preference is for gasoline (yes, even ethanol added). I've never had to clean any of my stoves since I started using it. Given that the quality is pretty closely monitored and regulated in the US this is an extremely consistent, clean burning, and cheap option. It's also extremely easy to find... It should be noted that the "white gas" available ...


3

Cheaper and easier solution. Attach your stove thingy (In my case, a pocket rocket). Open all the way and invert the can (away from flame sources obviously). Use a cheap and old fashioned church key to puncture the side. Total cost, approx. $0.50.


3

Chemically, they're very different, having to do with carbon chain lengths, the discussion about which will not help you decide. @WedaPashi gave an awesome answer, so, I'll add to it by saying this: First, you must know your stove; I assume you're asking about backpacking stoves who use jets, not generators. If so, the denser fuels (us-kero/uk-paraffin, ...


3

My experience with compact stoves for butane/propane mixture: Amazingly efficient when it is warm outside. Super for camping in the summer and early autumn. But in the late autumn, when the temperature starts to creep below 5 deg C: Not so efficient anymore. Alcohol stoves have fallen out of favour in Norway.


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