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How to touch up scratches on a black anodized aluminum flashlight? Try using black nail polish on your flashlight 🔦. But make sure it is a good quality nail polish and not something from the Dollar Store. People have used nail polish to remove scratches on cars for many years now. Some people may only know nail polish as something women put on their ...


6

The solution on my backpack/bike helmet is a rubber band/hair tie like cord around the straps just below the buckle. In order to readjust the buckle you have to loosen the elastic cord around the straps and pull it away from the buckle. Not sure exactly why this works, but I haven't had any problems with my helmet coming loose or backpack straps loosening ...


6

"How can I [make] it completely black?" Cover it with something black. Drawing on it with a black marker will work, but that might rub off after serious use. You could use black spray paint, but that requires etching into the rest of the anodized part. Black electrical tape would be great, and makes it a little more grippy when wet, but gets gross after a ...


5

If you've got the strap to the perfect length and want to maintain that length, you can sew a small fold in the strap, similar to what's used at the end to stop the whole strap running through. Slitting the stitches means you can change your mind later. Realistically this won't help for a waist belt that needs to adjust to different clothing, except as a ...


5

One possibility: Check out the home improvement store. Check the tool section. You can get all sorts of attachments for tool belts, including ones to carry things like a cell phone. They aren't rigid. If rock climbing I'd use this and something like an Otter Case to protect the phone itself. They don't have a ring for a 'biner, but they do have a loop ...


4

You may want to wash them because they stink too much for where you need to keep them. If it's just about mud, just brush them. Mine tend to get smellier if I've run through puddles or heavy rain, and then they're already wet so a wash is no problem. With mine, or my bike shoes, I take the laces out and remove the footbeds, and first rinse/brush off the ...


4

I have a small can of Bar-B-Q-Black, a Rustoleum product that we have used on scratches or dings on black metal objects, such as a wood-burning stove or a iron garden bench. This particular can says it resists heat up to 1,000 degrees F, which performance limit you are unlikely to need. If you Google Bar-B-Q-Black, Rustoleum you will find an array of ...


4

Seasoning is done for two reasons, To prevent rust/corrosion. To prevent sticking. While titanium can rust, in the process it creates a layer of titanium oxide which creates a protective layer that protects the inside from further corrosion and the non-sticking versions have a coating but are not seasonsed. Given that it doesn't need to be seasoned there ...


3

Outcome: In the end I followed the instructions and simply tapped the new pole tip on with a sharp strike of the pole onto hard flagstone pavement. With hindsight, I wonder if it would have been best to do this immediately after the old tip was removed and while any glue reside was still in its warm and sticky state. However despite doing it later the new ...


3

I find that simply tying a half knot below the buckle keeps it from slipping:


2

Pelican makes small cases for electronics. There is likely something of a size to do what you want.


2

I hose mine or throw them in the washer (front load). Remove inserts first. I don't see why they would take a couple days to dry. They should have a good bit of mesh and dry pretty quick. Even if they are damp they will dry fast once you put them on. I sometimes set mine outside in the sun or flip them upside down on a register. It sounds like you don't have ...


1

These are trail running shoes, not dress shoes that you will wear to the opera or to a job interview with a stuffy firm. They will get dirty on the next run, or the run after that, so there is little need to get them pristine after every run. Therefore, I suggest waiting until the mud has dried, and then brushing the dried mud off. For seams, and the ...


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