15

Augmented Reality... ... is what you are looking for. I basically agree with Olin Lathrop's answer: You don't, or at least shouldn't. As you say, it's public property, not yours. What you are asking is no different from how to leave garbage around your campsite so that casual observers won't see it. It's just plain irresponsible, and probably ...


12

There are a few, many of which are in common with simply hiking at night, but some are specific to geocaching. Firstly, the old scouts saying of be prepared! Make sure your torches, whether hand held or head, are properly charged (or you have spare batteries for them) as you don't want to get caught out in the dark without a light source. This also goes for ...


10

Interesting question! Here is an article describing the techniques used by arborists. The article describes a number of different techniques and different pieces of gear. I'll describe one specific method, using cheap gear, that is based on techniques that I've used in rock climbing. Buy: a short length (maybe 20 m) of 9-10 mm static climbing rope a small ...


9

I don't want, however, to inform anyone around about that cache - I want to keep it secret only for 'chosen'. Although you don't want to, I'd strongly suggest rethinking this - does it really matter if a few neighbours know, and it stops an embarrassing incident or two when the police are called out? When I placed a cache in a (public) residential area ...


9

The relevant law is the Gesetz zur Erhaltung des Waldes und zur Förderung der Forstwirtschaft. In § 14 Betreten des Waldes (entering the forest) it says (bolded by me): (1) Das Betreten des Waldes zum Zwecke der Erholung ist gestattet. Das Radfahren, das Fahren mit Krankenfahrstühlen und das Reiten im Walde ist nur auf Straßen und Wegen gestattet. Die ...


9

I've been geocaching for 12 or 13 years. I'm no power cacher, but I do have a few hundred finds. But you know what? I also have a couple hundred no finds. Some may have been missing at the time, while others were found the very next day by someone else. A few I managed after a subsequent visit, but there are a small number that elude me to this day. ...


9

In addition to the good advice Tullochgorum gave, I have been Geocaching for a couple years, i did it for about a year with just my phone, later i bought a dedicated GPS device, used it for awhile and then went back to my phone. With the correct app a phone is just fine. I find mine to be accurate to about 10 feet, with the given hints and whatnot in the ...


8

GeoKret is an open alternative to commercial TravelBugs. It is an independent solution, having own site: geokrety.org, where you can log it. It is integrated with OpenCaching portal, but Groundspeak is not willing to integrate them with their site. You can use Chrome plugin called GeoKrety Toolbox. Registering new GeoKret costs you nothing, but you need ...


8

I don't think estimating is the correct approach to climbing trees. See, from mechanics, the tree branch is a cantilever beam. So comparing branches could be done if stepping only at the base of it, only with one foot. Then there is the variable is the branch live or dried out. Lastly, calculating the strength of a branch would include not only ...


8

I'm lucky to come from the UK where this isn't really an issue (though we still have adders, so sometimes I'm a bit wary.) Having said that, I'll generally still take the following precautions to avoid being bitten, even if it's not life threatening (red ant bytes can still be bloody annoying for instance, and there's lots of those!) Use a torch. I always ...


8

button compass pencil sharpener magnifying glass (updates when I think of some more)


8

Use something that is already there. I competed on a similar event recently - a set of clues were given out that each led to a location, and at each location the clue gave a number (for example, "how many bolts on the gate", or "What's the third digit of the sign-makers phone number") - these numbers together gave a map reference to the next control ...


7

The easiest option is to use this website: Garmin.Openstreetmap.nl It has an option to select just the map tiles you want, so you can get a map for a fairly small area if you want. To do this, choose the option for "Enable manual tile selection", then click on the tiles to select them. Then enter your email address, and click the button for "Build my map". ...


7

I'd say the following are important things to have: Good signal strength is a must - Geocaching will often take you into built up areas or wooded areas, and it's incredibly frustrating going round in circles with an inaccurate GPS when one with a better signal strength could home in on it with no problem at all. Good battery life, preferably with standard ...


7

I bought a 1 lb bag of random foreign coins on eBay for $5. A cheap, neat little thing to find in a cache.


7

You don't, or at least shouldn't. As you say, it's public property, not yours. What you are asking is no different from how to leave garbage around your campsite so that casual observers won't see it. It's just plain irresponsible, and probably illegal. A good test is what would happen if lots of people did the same thing you are considering. Picking ...


6

This depends on what sort of cache it is, and how big it is. I presume it is some sort of 'micro' or 'nano' cache. One popular type for these is a screwtop magnetic container, eg Nano Cache Container. These are only about 1cm diameter and height, and often silver or black. So if stuck onto something metal, it can be hardly noticeable. It might just look ...


6

It is/was a popular pastime for environmentalists to chain themselves to the rails, and worse, to throw hooks onto the catenary. Trains catch these hooks and rip the catenary down. For this reason, the Train Police (Bahnpolizei) is sometimes on the lookout, and if they can't find real terrorists, harass normal people. I'd avoid railway lines when atomic ...


6

If you want to drop some really useful outdoor items, consider that all plastic straps, strap side release latches and strap adjusters, as well as safety-pins, needles and threads, and other repair items. Some caches may bless you for it if his/hers rucksack is damaged while hiking, and they have not repair kit. Such things are cheap to buy in bulk, but ...


6

Books Check charity shops, you can often get books for £1, or sometimes 4 for £1. Or any books you have read, and don't want to keep. You can pick relevant books, ie anything about the outdoors, or children's books for a family friendly cache, or something specific to the local area or theme of the cache. You do have to be selective as to what books will ...


6

According to the Treasure Hunt wiki page, Letterboxing is considered a form of treasure hunting. Clues are distributed by various manners, including orally, and lead to a specific destination. A difference that stands out to me is that Letterboxing, specifically, tends to include stamps that a player can stamp their own personal log book with to keep track ...


6

The biggest difference between letterboxing (at least on Dartmoor, its original home) are: letterboxes are usually intended to be left out indefinitely. they're put out for anyone to find. It's quite common when looking for a specific box with a precise clue (or even GPS) to find another box. If part of a series this may tell you how to get the clues for ...


5

On mobile devices, the Gaia GPS app allows creating a waypoint using whichever format is currently selected (which includes UTM). From your computer, you can enter UTM coordinates into CalTopo; this is convenient if you are printing out paper maps. (It also has some ability to annotate maps and save them to KMZ/KML files for use with Google Earth or your ...


5

There are many devices that will let you enter in UTM and LatLong coordinates interchangeably. be sure to bring a waterproof map with you too though. http://www.rei.com/product/869473/garmin-gpsmap-64-gps http://www.magellangps.com/Store/eXploristSeries/eXplorist-510


5

If the police catches you walking on the rail, the fine will be small. But there are some other risks: A high voltage power line above you. Walking on a rail is a popular method for suicide. If someone sees you they may call an ambulance, the police and stop all trains on that track. If the railway company has to compensate hundreds of passengers for being ...


5

There have been discussions that because of night geocaching activities the forest laws in some Länder (I know it from Hessen) should get night restrictions. There is a general right to walk in the forest, also outside trails and including privately owned forest. This can be restricted for certain reasons (e.g. young forest areas, areas with ongoing ...


5

Several people have already mentioned getting special gloves that have "flippable" finger tips, but no one has specifically mentioned sensory gloves which can be a little bit different than gloves that just flip their tips. In addition to flip-tips they also have a little hole that you can touch through, so you don't actually have to take your finger tip all ...


5

What's the width of the hole? I'm thinking of a mounting system like a wall socket. Spread it aginst the inner surface. Then tie the cach on it. Or the very low cost variant: Just use a piece of wire and bend it accordingly


5

A hook/eyelet toggle bolt could work, depending on the weight of the cache: If you unscrew the toggles and reverse them, the hook would be on the inside holding the string, and you would reach in with two fingers and squeeze the toggles to extract the cache. Much cheaper than a climbing cam, but the same idea!


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