40

Yes, you absolutely should rescue the climber when the situation allows. The reason that matters most is suspension trauma: Prolonged motionless hanging in a harness can lead to loss of consciousness and eventually even death. Of course you say the victim is conscious, so he might be able to move or even install a foot-loop to transition weight to his legs. ...


23

First of all: Walking a glacier contains some serious risks and roping up is not enough to cover that risks, but also knowledge of crevasse rescue is needed. Therefore I strongly recommend a glacier course where all those things are taught. Now for some basic things to consider when walking a glacier as a roped party: When walking a glacier, one normally ...


21

Additionally to @imsodins brilliant answer, I'd say the same applies to almost any mountain rescue situation: if you are able to contribute to the situation while maintaining your own safety, do it (and if you're not able, stay out of the way of the rescue team) securing your position takes precedence over the next steps (you don't want to be the next task ...


19

This is a very complicated topic, and you can take an entire course where you learn and practice the techniques. Reading an answer on SE is not going to be enough. You need to practice. The following is just an outline. There is an entire chapter in Freedom of the Hills on glacier travel and crevasse rescue. The first step is always going to be to construct ...


19

If you have some credible people saying not to be roped up, I'd love to see it, because that sounds completely insane to me. Here's why: If you are traveling on a glacier without being roped up, there is a very, very, very good chance that you will die if you fall in a crevasse. This isn't because you vanish into nowhere, but because you will get what we ...


19

In a 3:1 (Z-pulley) haul, the victim's rope is used for hauling directly. As you point out correctly, a surface rescue is impossible if you have knots in the rope, since the rope is under tension and you cannot untie the knots. However, you can also drop a different strand of rope down to the victim and haul them out with that (it's then called a rescue ...


18

If the glacier isn't snowless (aper) you can probe for spaces under the surface which should be noticed by less resistance in the snow/Firn. Still it is preferable to avoid going in regions where one would expect crevasses. This isn't easy like it is tough to know how the weather is going to evolve in the mountains. But still we could try to use some theory ...


15

I would use a dyneema rope as a lightweight hauling rope, rap line, or rescue rope, but I would never use any kind of static rope to catch a fall, this would include a fall into a crevasse, or a slip on a slope. With static ropes there is nearly zero energy absorption, I imagine this is even more true with dyneema. In the event of a fall during glacier ...


14

Beal Ropes has a guide that covers this. Read the page but here are two images for quick reference: A robust half rope such as the Mammut Genesis is probably a very good choice; such a rope is much lighter than a 10mm Single but still has a thick sheath. See also: A Comparison of Stretch and Forces Between Low and High-Stretch Ropes During Simulated ...


14

First, see my comment above. Get some professional instruction. Seriously. To answer your points directly: Build a snow anchor, then transfer the load to your anchor. Holding your partner's weight for the entire duration of a self rescue would be a bad idea. Building an anchor is independent of what your partner is doing. Always build an anchor. On ...


14

Sometimes shadows or shapes in the snow give away the location of covered crevasses. Sometimes you can detect a crevasse with a shallow covering of snow by poking with an ice axe or a probe of some sort. The only sure way to detect if there is a crevasse is when you can see it, or when you fall into it when you cannot see it.


14

While children can be proficient mountaineers and well trained, there are things they likely cannot do and some additional risks they face. For example, children are more susceptible to hypothermia. Most children are not capable of performing first aid and lack the physical strength to dig out someone trapped in an avalanche. If a single adult is climbing ...


13

The answer of @BenediktBauer covers pretty much everything you have to know as a beginner on glaciers. What you also have to know is the proper knot (and that was the second part of your question). You can use the figure eight, like is recommended in sport climbing too (so most people will already know this knot). You of course have to watch out, because of ...


11

There is a clear answer here: just don't do it! Glacier rescue is challenging - you need to know the techniques and practice them seriously. And I can tell you from experience that a glacier rescue is scary, stressful and exhausting, and that was with a party of 4 fit and experienced adults. If you have to ask the question, you simply don't have the skills ...


11

Absolutely yes. I don't leave my home without them (well, another model than the one you linked) if there is any chance of hitting snow/ice during a hike. For such hikes, they always, at any time of the year, sit at the bottom of my pack, right next to the survival sheet. I've had at least two occasions where they transformed a stupendously dangerous ...


10

about excess rope, rope length and how to split rope please see: https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7025/2653 As you see on the picture, the two ends of the rope is devided evenly between the first and the last rope team member. If you don't know this, I guess you don't know how to rescue someone in case of crevasse fall. You should really learn it by ...


9

The most important point in any emergency is to avoid making the situation worse. The situation you describe is dynamic and may have several outcomes. Its not really possible to make a decision without seeing the details of the situation. If you attempt to help and mess up there may be more casualties to rescue and the injuries may be worse. Alternatively ...


8

As already stated several times: If you know what you need to do on a glacier, you know what material to take. The other way round does not work: Just having the necessary gear will not insure proper crevasse rescue. So your first step is to take a course or find someone experienced to show you. This is the only recommended way to do it, but that is of ...


8

Another answer talks about hardness. There is some relevance to that, but more importantly, ice is brittle, regardless of how hard it is. You don't need much of a tool to scrape or crack chunks from a large piece of ice like a glacier. Also, any large piece of ice has to have edges someplace. It's easier to split off pot-sized chunks from edges than ...


8

You don't use ordinary tent pegs, you use something a lot more substantial. For example, pictured below are two ice screws (cheap ones I found a picture of on Ali Express), which would work if the ice is hard enough. These screw into the ice and the threads hold them in place. If you use these, and you leave your tent behind during the day, make sure you ...


7

Its more important to know where to expect them. Under tension, Ice is brittle, and strong and in compression. Can we relate the tension and compression under the circumstances like gradient and slope? At least I don't have a strong geology, so there no exact bullet-proof way of detecting a crevasse (unless you don't have a GPR with you :D). You can ...


7

Depends on how steep your ice patch is. Crampons are really good when you have steep slopes and you need to do some real front pointing. Crampons are good for mixed climbing as well. They are also heavier than microspikes. Microspikes make a good choice when the slopes are less steep. And when your needs for grip are not that severe. From my experience, ...


6

The first thing you need to find out is how heavily crevassed the glacier is, and whether any crevasses are likely to be big enough to fall into. Crevasses can be hidden by snow, so people can fall into them unexpectedly. If you have reliable information that there are no crevasses big enough to fall into, then the use of ice axes and crampons is decided by ...


6

The Mohs hardness scale is a common scale used to describe the hardness (resistance to scratching) of different materials. The hardness of ice is between 1.5 and 6 Mohs. The hardness of granite is 7 Mohs so you should be able to scratch ice with rocks you find. I cannot find a definitive answer on the hardness of wood, but it seems like wood would not ...


6

It depends, if the snow is pretty level and you don't need the front points on the crampons to get up things, then yes microspikes can be a good substitute as they are certainly lighter and don't require specialized boots. They will never be a full substitute for crampons, but they should fit your purposes better than crampons would. For bigger glaciers I ...


5

In addition to Felix's excellent answer of what should be done it practice, it is well worth knowing how to pass a knot in the rope (whether while rappelling or hauling). This will generally be more time consuming than just having an extra length of rope for which to affect the rescue and it should be noted that the knots that were tied to add friction on ...


4

One of the most important thing in ski mountaineering is weight of equipment. So you should take only what you really need. That will allow you quickly move and enjoy a trip. Regarding what to take (Piolet(s), Whippets, ice tools): ice tools used only for ice climbing and technical routes. Usage is very limited. Also ice tools can't be used for self ...


4

Personally I would go with poles and one ice-axe as long as possible. As soon as there are have prolonged steep slopes (defined by having to ascend with front points of crampons) I would take two axes. I originally wrote the paragraph below assuming it was mountaineering (in May - silly me). It is still relevant and applicable, but it assumes that a pole is ...


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