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26

Gloves or Mittens? All things being equal (fabrics, thickness, and insulation), mittens are warmer than gloves. Mitts trap body heat by keeping your fingers together and reducing evaporative heat loss. In frigid temperatures, a layered mitt system is the best choice for warmth. Layers dry faster than one heavily insulated piece, and let you swap out wet ...


20

This is simply a question of the increased surface area of gloves which will therefore increase temperature (heat flux) exchange. Same reason why foxes have smaller ears as further away they are located from the equator. This reduces the heat flux of polar foxes and in this case keeps the body temperature higher. Compared to gloves mittens are therefore ...


16

As other people have mentioned mittens are warmer in almost all circumstances, a large part of this is that your entire hand is keeping the inside warm rather than each finger trying to warm itself individually. Where they fall down is when you need to take your hand out of the mitts, everything from taking photos to having something to eat becomes a chore ...


16

The best answer I’ve come up with so far is to combine neoprene paddling gloves such as those sold by NRS with an additional pair of waterproof or semi-waterproof mitten shells designed to be worn over gloves / mittens. This has kept my fingers completely comfortable in air temperatures well below freezing while paddling through rivers or bays where ice is ...


14

I haven't been paddling much for several years, but I used to go all winter with simple fleece gloves inside waterproof dishwashing rubber gloves. I tried a half dozen other alternatives, including wetsuit gloves, other waterproof gloves, pogies, etc. Fleece insulation and waterproof outside worked best, and was also very inexpensive.


10

The variety used by pipe fitters working the oil fields in the Great White North: You sound like you're working on the oil rigs, which explains why the pointer finger on your gloves keeps blowing out. Ski gloves and climbing gloves aren't going to take the abuse of turning pipe all day, what you need is a sturdy pair of leather gloves with a reinforced ...


9

1.) I would be hesitant to advise you to put them in the dryer. I've never tried or experienced it myself, and my evidence is completely anecdotal, but I've heard that the neoprene has the potential to turn brittle if exposed to forced heating. 2.) The two main things to consider when drying out gloves like this (as well as other things like boots, socks, ...


9

The physicists answer: there could be such a measure (it exists for example for the insulation of buildings), but it would in the case of clothing depend on so many factors that it would be close to useless. Factors that have an influence here are things like physical activity, wind, humidity or personal disposition. To begin with the last one: There are ...


8

Sometimes known as paddle mitts, pogies are your friends here, you can choose to wear gloves in them as well or not, depending on how cold it's got, but most importantly they allow you full contact with the paddle and hence you don't get the extra fatigue caused by a reduced level of paddle control. Pogies range from a simple nylon shell that keeps the wind ...


8

Mittens are normally warmer than gloves. On most expeditions (high mountains or very cold temperatures) most people wear thick down/synthetic mittens, because they're warmer than gloves. The blood flow in one finger is not that much and so it helps if all the fingers are in one big mitten. It's also not possible and practical in use to produce very thick ...


4

From looking at the pictures I would say that for the "default" conditions at summer glacier/alpine tours they should be perfectly fine. In dry but slightly coldish conditions they will give you good grip and rope handling, as long as you don't have to dig through snow with them. The reason why you have got cold fingers while cycling might be on the one ...


4

Gloves have separate fingers; they are less warm but allow you to use your hands better. Mittens have only a separate thumb; they are warmer but restrict the hands. Both types come in all sorts of materials, and there are even combinations, e.g. gloves with detachable 'mitten-like' finger boxes. See also this question.


4

If leather gloves are doing the job, why change? There are a lot of variables, but it really comes down to exposure. For the most part gloves only protect your hands. When working in and around a large fire, you also need to consider exposure to the rest of your body as well. Increasing the fire rating of you gloves, only adds value if you also ...


3

As @Paul Lydon said, it is subjective because some people feel the cold more than others. Plus some people who are otherwise relatively unaffected by cold may, because of circulation problems, feel the cold in their hands more than others. The answer to the OP's question also depends on the length of time he will be outside, and the wind, and whether his ...


2

Are mittens warmer than gloves? Let's answer this question. To start off, we need to think about heat. Mittens have all your fingers but your thumb pretty much touching. All of these fingers produce their own body heat, and having all the fingers together, that heat can be shared amongst all the fingers, and some heat gets to your thumb as well which is ...


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