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12

I have used both Grigri devices (the older one much more often than the new one), but I own neither. So I can answer at least most of your questions: have you used this device? I have used it a few times ;-) Does it wear the rope less than its predecessor? I don't know, I didn't use it more than a few times, and my ropes get used with all kinds of belay ...


10

This is a known problem for the GriGri, especially the newer version GriGri2. The GriGri2 is compatible with rope diameters of 8.9-11mm. The old one officially supports 10-11mm diameter, however is often used with thinner ropes as well (at your own risk). So the tendency for the rope to get stuck while feeding it out is certainly bigger with the new GriGri. ...


7

In general: No. While some devices use mechanisms that can be different from the Grigri (in some cases radically different, such as the Wild Country Revo), all current sports climbing devices require the user to keep a hand on the braking strand of the rope. Some provide more room for user error than others, but the basic principle stays the same. ...


7

We used GriGri extensively at my local wall for groups, route setting and emergency rescue in the wall. The key issue is that like a car seat belt a GriGri needs inertia to fire it - a sudden jerk. If you weight it slowly it can slip and not lock. I experienced it while route setting and had it not been for the Petzl Shunt positioned above my ...


6

There are several scenarios but they all boil down to not using the brake hand but instead hoping the device will catch or improperly sized ropes. 1) with super-skinny ropes; 2) an extremely light climber; 3) routes with bulges or significant rope drag that reduce the forces of a fall; and 4) hanging on the rope (versus falling) mid-...


6

I own a Grigri1 and a Grigri+, and I'm used to the Grigri2 too. To me Grigri+ is better. Positives: new materials, improved casing, no sharp edges, anti-panic handle, greater range of ropes can be well controlled by belayers and, last, the new system about belaying top-rope (though useless to me). Negative: the more you go further 9,4 mm the more you ...


5

I have done this before, and it not all that different from jugging up a rope. What you will want to do it to attach the knots (typically a figure eight on a bight) to your belay loop with a locking carbiner. That way, if the gri gri was to fail, you would only fall until you the rope went tight. Tying the knots more often will limit the potential drop. If ...


4

Most harnesses allow you to either tie into your belay loop or through the two loops the belay loop goes through. This does not really matter. The belay loop is tested with 15kN in the norm: (Source: UIAA) A load of 15kN is by far exceeding any load that could ever be applied. While the norm specifies a maximum of impact force of 12kN for single ropes, ...


3

To add to Charlie's answer, a big mistake would be to hold it improperly. Specifically, if you hold the bottom of the Gri Gri you can actually prevent the auto-braking to engage. And especially when a climber falls and the belayer panics!


3

It does depend on the type of harness. Some don’t have separate tie-in points, particularly entry level harnesses used by indoor walls. Harnesses are built to be bomb-proof where it matters and a well looked after harness with no signs of damage or wear will never, ever, break at the belay loop or tie-in points. The main points of the two tie-in points ...


2

It is a question of design, rather than safety: You could make a safe harness with some other combination of loops for tying in and belaying, but the current combination is familiar and has some benefits over e.g. harnesses without a dedicated belay loop. Tie-in points in modern harnesses are reinforced against abrasion. Some harnesses use brightly colored ...


1

Other answers are good and one thing I would like to mention is ergonomics. Thing about which way the grigri would face if was also clipped into the tie-in-points. The grigri would be sideways (that is to saw the rope would feed out horizontally). This yields different body mechanics. Back in the day when we would hip belay that motion made sense since ...


1

Just to go into the most commonly used device for this, Rock Exotica silent partner- the rope is secured to the ground (and the top), and clove hitched to a spinning drum on the device. The drum allows the rope to pass through the device as the climber ascends, but under rapid speeds, the drum will lock and the clove hitch will tighten and stop the climber.


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