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10

I have used both Grigri devices (the older one much more often than the new one), but I own neither. So I can answer at least most of your questions: have you used this device? I have used it a few times ;-) Does it wear the rope less than its predecessor? I don't know, I didn't use it more than a few times, and my ropes get used with all kinds of belay ...


8

This is a know problem for the GriGri, especially the newer version GriGri2. The GriGri2 is compatible with rope diameters of 8.9-11mm. The old one officially supports 10-11mm diameter, however is often used with thinner ropes as well (on your own risk). So the tendency for the rope to get stuck while feeding it out is certainly bigger with the new GriGri. ...


7

We used GriGri extensively at my local wall for groups, route setting and emergency rescue in the wall. The key issue is that like a car seat belt a GriGri needs inertia to fire it - a sudden jerk. If you weight it slowly it can slip and not lock. I experienced it while route setting and had it not been for the Petzl Shunt positioned above my ...


5

I own a Grigri1 and a Grigri+, and I'm used to the Grigri2 too. To me Grigri+ is better. Positives: new materials, improved casing, no sharp edges, anti-panic handle, greater range of ropes can be well controlled by belayers and, last, the new system about belaying top-rope (though useless to me). Negative: the more you go further 9,4 mm the more you ...


5

I have done this before, and it not all that different from jugging up a rope. What you will want to do it to attach the knots (typically a figure eight on a bight) to your belay loop with a locking carbiner. That way, if the gri gri was to fail, you would only fall until you the rope went tight. Tying the knots more often will limit the potential drop. If ...


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