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27

Been there, done that, it's far more worrisome when you have to show them how to put the harness on and then have them test that it's tight enough. And like you said, you really don't want to touch them. The simple solutions is to show them how you take your harness off, and have them mirror your actions and go through the steps slowly. I will point to what ...


25

Most climbing harnesses support the majority of your weight, if freely suspended, around the tops of the thighs. While the waist belt may be designed to take the brunt of loads in a fall once you are suspended the weight will tend to settle onto the leg loops, depending of course on the position that you end up in. But either way the harness will end up ...


16

I don't have anything to add for the specific requirement of removing ones harness, the live-demonstration/mirroring recommendations in other answers should do just fine. I want to address a slightly more general point: [...] without touching them It should become blatantly clear from what follows (and shouldn't be a debatable point anyway), but to be ...


14

It is not really about instructing people how to take the harness off, but rather about respecting the personal space of clients. I suggest having an instructor demonstrate the steps to take off the harness when the harness is put on and again when the client is about to remove the harness. This requires having a spare harness, but just like on the airplane, ...


9

Yes, men and womens climbing harnesses are different. A number of styles are specifically designed for a women’s physique, with unique fit and comfort characteristics built in. Be aware that a men’s version of a harness will not fit the same as a women’s version. Women–specific aspects include: Shaped waistbelt. Increased rise. Reduction in ...


9

Lots of people will double up twist-lock carabiners for various reasons, and it is considered an acceptable method of protection by many, although in my opinion it is very unnecessary (related: Is it ever necessary to double up locking carabiners?). They do not however bypass the belay loop as you are describing by clipping a biner into both the seat and ...


9

No you cannot - as long as you fit it correctly. One test you have to do when adjusting the width of the hip strap, is to pull down on the harness to make sure it is impossible to pull it over your hip. So no matter in what weird position you fall, the harness can neither move up (leg loops) nor down (width of hip loop as explained) significantly. ...


9

Others might be able to give a more authoritative answer to this, or relate personal experiences where too much distance was a problem. However, I think there would be a clear problem if you were trying to lead climb with the figure-eight knot tied too far from your body. Imagine the situation where you're positioned with your hips directly in front of a ...


8

The main problem is the disruption of the normal blood circulation. The blood pressure generated by the heart alone is not able to persistently pump back the blood from the feet, it needs the venes and the "muscle pump" generated by movement of the legs, especially of the feet against the ground. The loss of consciousness is a symptom, but after a person ...


7

It would take more time but when they are dry at the top have them remove the harness on their own for practice. Tell them when they get to the bottom they should remove the harness when given the signal to do so. If they need help an instructor is also at the bottom.


7

I don't think it is great practice, but lots of people top rope off of a single biner attached to the belay loop. The belay loop is plenty strong for this purpose, but the carabiner adds an additional single point of failure into the system. Two locking carabiners that are opposite and opposed would provide redundancy in the case of failure. Using the belay ...


7

Based on your edit that adds additional context your plan seems reasonable. In addition to the carabiners ShemSeger recommends you might consider a captive eye carabiner (any rated biner is fine. I'm just using these DMM biners as an example). These are often used in more industrial settings so they're often found in steel. Alternatively you can get a DMM ...


7

You certainly can, if the waist belt isn't high enough and tight enough. A few years ago I briefly worked at a small rock wall where among other duties I belayed and showed people how to put on a harness. In my experience most newcomers don't (want to) fit the waist belt properly, and a significant fraction of regular climbers fail here too. The waist ...


6

The wikipedia page you quote should be right, of course this may vary by situation and person. So The asnwer to "how fast" is "about 20 minutes". This is indeed not a whole lot of time. When it is clear that within the next few minutes the person can not be lowered to the ground by normal means, rescue should start immediately. If the person is conscious, ...


5

From a male friend I heard that a wrongly designed or wrongly adjusted harness did hurt his private parts when it came under stress the first time. In this case not permanent because he was wise enough to test the harness while still on the ground, but as he is likely to abseil it could have happened when he was committed on the way down. He also told us ...


5

Consider this Black Diamond Harness, Image Source as you will notice, there is no belay loop at all. This is how the directions show one belaying with it. However, this type of harness is designed to be used this way, most other harnesses are not. For data on how hard it would be to break a tri-axial loaded crabiner consider that Black Diamond was able ...


4

From a technical standpoint, it depends. For example, for the Petzl Falcon line of rescue harness, only the Mountain is rated fo operations involving technical climbing. The Ascent is not suitable for progression using rock climbing techniques. You will need to carefully read the instructions for your rescue harness to determine its suitability for rock ...


3

Another benefit of a close knot is less rope movement at the tie in. This is the rare case of nylon-to-nylon contact in the safety chain, abrasion will happen with heavy use. Also, +1 for getting hit with the back up knot.


3

One other issue with having a high knot is what happens when you fall. I once tied a figure-eight close to my harness (no issue there), but then followed it up with a strangle knot that was quite high (maybe a foot above the figure-eight). When I fell, I was sure someone had punched me in the face. In reality the rope had snapped tight and the strangle knot ...


2

When you see them struggling ask for permission to help before touching. While helping try and maintain a professional distance away. There is a big difference between getting up close and personal to fiddle with the buckles and doing it at 3/4 armlengths away. When handling the buckles around the waist and legs you can squat down which is less invading ...


2

I can only agree with the previous answers that clipping into the tie in points just increases the risk of the carabiner not being loaded as designed. And there have been accidents of carabiners not being loaded as designed and I found a source that mentions such a failure that involved cliping into two tie in points. In the following source two cases ...


2

All harness manufacturers instruct users to put carabiners through the belay loop and not the tie-in points. Petzl has it in their manual: Black Diamond's Director of Global Quality Kolin Powick (who does much of their gear testing) has this to say: “You should only ever have a carabiner through your belay loop,” he says. Belay loops keep everything ...


1

Yes... You can easily do this experiment yourself. Attach a carabiner to both leg and waist loops. Tie the biner to a rope or use a sling and hang from a branch or anchor. Observe how the biner is loaded. Depending on your individual harness, body and carabiner, there will be some degree of triaxial load ie the alignment of forces on the biner will not be ...


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