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33

Water. The American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid courses in 2021 recommend irrigating wounds with at least a liter of potable water, using an irrigation syringe. If you don't have enough potable water, washing with non-potable water is acceptable and you should finish off with potable water. The stronger antiseptic chemicals are indeed antiseptic, but ...


20

The best thing you can do to both ward off illness, and catch any illness so it can be treated early, is to schedule an appointment with your doctor, soon. When you request the appointment, make sure you mention drinking untreated creek water as the reason for the appointment. That will give your doctor time to look up references to the appropriate ...


16

When someone is so badly injured that they need immediate professional medical treatment, and you are able to get them that treatment within a day, then wound disinfection isn't a priority. Infections take days to set in, and modern antibiotics administered at the hospital can prevent that from happening. According to several first aid courses I did, trying ...


14

As skin cancer is such a major issue in Australia, there is a huge range of products that shield the nose. From the Australian Cancer Council, see this one which clips onto your sunglasses as an example.


13

Zinc Oxide Paste Surfers use zinc oxide for the most burnable areas of the face, and it might work for you too. It's an opaque white paste that totally blocks harmful UV. It's not greasy like sunscreen, and it won't run when you sweat. A little dab on your exposed areas should keep them safe.


9

Ski goggles. They're made for just that - blocking UV - and allow you to wear prescription glasses underneath. Did just this on several summer cycling and kayak trips. All day in full sun ones, including pulling into Forks, WA at 95F on the city thermometer after an 80k ride. With glasses. Whatever unpleasantness was going on, the goggles weren't a big ...


7

Having perused my well read copy of NOLS Wilderness Medicine (available e.g. through NOLS), there is no mention of hydrogen peroxide use at all. The only two things mentioned for wound cleaning are (1) water, and (2) water with povidone-iodine. Use of a syringe to irrigate the wound is strongly suggested. If you have limited clean water, rinse with untreated ...


7

Some face shields also include nose protection, e.g. (mirror): Another option is using a UV face shield visor, e.g. (mirror): Good feedback on it in the comment section: That fancy visor doesn't seem to be practical in a mild windy outdoor environment. – Pere 2 hours ago Ben Crowell claims most of us don't want to look that silly with a nose guard but I ...


6

Thinking practically, how about just putting a bandaid on there? Or buying surfer’s sunblock that really sticks for a long time.


5

The body type of proficient rock climbers does not often match what society wants you to perceive as "strong". But, rest assured, good rock climbers have tremendously strong muscles (bilaterally) as well as incredible flexibility. Physical height can represent an advantage as it makes it easier to reach certain holds, especially on certain routes. ...


3

At the time, yes. Don't eat anything when you drink the water. This will reduce the likelihood and severity of food poisoning. The ingested water will have its pH rapidly reduced which will kill some pathogens. if you have food in the stomach as well this will happen more slowly. Also, a bolus of food is more likely to protect and transport pathogens. ...


3

For what it's worth, I had a previously scheduled appointment with my primary-care physician a few days after the incident. One of his interests/specialties is remote and wilderness medicine. His advice was that in the absence of symptoms there is nothing to do but wait. There is no way to preempt symptomatic infection after exposure, but if symptoms develop ...


1

Both will partially neutralize hydrochloric acid in the stomach but I am not sure I would call that "help". A stomach is supposed to be very acidic. The burning sensation is acid leaking past the spincter muscle into the esophagus, not the stomach. I have used a little calcium bicarbonate in water to rinse acid out of the esophagus with success.


1

I would just use a small Band-Aid. Easily removed when no longer needed.


1

Many years ago, I was in a similar situation. When I returned to civilization I went to see a medical doctor. If I recall correctly, the doctor ordered one or two tests in which I was required to collect a small amount of my stool and place it in a cup for analysis. My memory of the experience has faded, but I think the cup was filled with some sort of ...


1

I am a retired university professor in Public Health, especially in simple remedies. My Korean wife and I have traveled into 30 countries giving seminars. The one friend of travelers is charcoal, either powder or tablets. It is one of the best stomach remedies to protect from water or food in foreign situations. A couple of cards of Activated Charcoal ...


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