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7

Acclimatization is like training a muscle. You create a stimulus and recover. If you stay at a high altitude, your recovery will be limited and acclimatization will be slow. Note that while this is the main reason, there is a whole array of practical points as well: Advancing from camp to camp (without descending) will severely limit the altitude difference ...


11

Basically what happens is that the body needs some time to start producing more red blood cells. If you stay at the higher level your body can't cope with the acute lack of oxygen and as a result you run the risk of altitude sickness, pulmonary edema, cerebral edema and death*. Altitude sickness can occur at heights above about 2500 m, so you don't even need ...


1

An easy way to tell is simply that your elevation was not high enough to cause even mild altitude sickness. The cabin of a passenger jet has an air pressure equivalent to about 8000 ft of altitude, so there's no way that 7000 ft will cause any kind of altitude sickness. Elevations more like 11,000-13,000 ft are required to produce any significant problems ...


5

The single most obvious indicator is going to be looking at your SpO2 level. If you oxygen saturation is low it is a good indication you are experiencing altitude sickness. The easiest way is with a pulse oximeter. They cost <$20 on Amazon and are both small and light. If you are going to be doing something outdoors where altitude is a concern then just ...


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