Hot answers tagged

8

Blisters are more a function of improperly fitting/not broken in footwear than the specific type, although some kinds can be worse than others. Heavier and stiffer boots take longer to break in than light running shoes for example. I would get the type of footwear that works best for the terrain and size and break them in properly before going on your hikes....


7

I also have feet which are blister sensitive, but I'm not overweight. In principle, everything that 'dampens' your steps, avoids blisters, but cost energy. So it's a tradeoff. This includes for example thick/extra socks, soles. My experiences with hiking and walking events: About shoes: Not too long, this causes your feet to move inside your shoes back ...


5

I'm likely out of the norm, but I believe properly fitting (and thickness) socks may be even more important than the shoes with regard to blisters. I personally use Darn Tough because they are knit so that there aren't any seams per se that could cause any issues. I size them so they are somewhat snug so there can be no bunching. I prefer them lighter weight ...


5

There are a lot of factors that determine when you will get blisters that it is hard to say if one is better than the other. For example, brand new hiking boots vs. brand new trail runners is a totally different question than 1 year old worn in boots vs. runners. You also need to consider (not exhaustive): Shoe fit Socks worn (socks compatible with hiking ...


5

I'll go for a frame challenge in my answer: If you don't have any condition (that's being treated by a professional) that requires you to wear any kind of knee protection, the best protection for your knees is using no knee-protectors. If your knee hurts during/after hiking, this a pointer that you either use some kind of bad technique or simply over-...


4

The most common cause for a blister to appear on your foot is due to the friction of your foot moving and rubbing inside of your shoe. The best way to avoid this happening is to ensure that you thoroughly take your time getting the right size of shoe. Whether you go with a hiking boot or trail runner is personal preference.


3

As someone who thru-hiked the AT, and has had many a blister, I can safely say that you really need do nothing for them other than to remove the dead skin once the blister pops, off load any pressure being placed upon them if possible and keep it as clean and dry as possible. Unless you are diabetic, immunocompromised or a heavy smoker, they will heal in ...


3

Actually, I would use knee protectors only when needed. It could be used to prevent it, but mainly if you suspect you might get an injury. Instead I would focus on preventing by using a better technique for going up or down a slope, like: Making small steps Not going straight up and down, but zig-zag, so the angle of your feet is low. Of course the ...


3

Summary: Average monthly on-trail cost: $1,000 Up-front gear costs: A complete PCT setup can be purchased for anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars, depending on quality level, pre-owned vs new, durability, and weight. Long form answer: The "average" figure usually provided by experienced thruhikers as a guideline for on-trail PCT expenses ...


2

In the past when my knees seemed more susceptible to irritation of the cartilage, I carried two elastic sleeves for them (cheap drug store items). Mostly they just were loose around my socks. On downhill sections I would slide them up over my knees. Now, I did not count on these to of themselves protect my knees. Instead, I used them to remind me not to ...


2

Don't overthink this problem! I have decades of experience being in calorie debt every year, for two or so weeks at a time, at least twice a year, on backpacking trips (when younger), and I advise recovering from calorie debt by eating whatever you want, plus, at dinner, a glass or two of wine. But, even if you are ravenous when you get out, don't stuff ...


2

It actually depends where you hike, the type and size of your backpack, the type of sleeping pad and how much you carry in your pack. I use a Mountain Smith Mayhem 45lt which is a top loading and also can be accessed from the back. It has an internal frame. Putting the sleeping pad inside lined around the pack will not enable me to access quickly to the ...


1

Prevention is important: Wear the shoes with trip socks for a few weeks before the trip. The shorter distances involved in day to day living will get your feet accustomed to your shoes. There are compounds sold that will toughen skin. Rubbing alcohol is one. Salt water is one. I find that if my feet have been wet enough of the day to get prunefoot, that ...


1

The easiest is to just tie a knot in it and use it as is but treading it in the shoe so the knot is not going to interfere with the job. The easiest knot to use is an overhand knot, (also known by many other names and I have never met anybody who was not able to tie it.) Tie it in both ends at the same time, having the broken ends sticking out together and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible