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16

Before marking any trails, please speak to the forest service or whatever local authority is in charge of the land. They likely have established methods for trail marking that should be followed, and using other means may even counteract their conservation efforts. In many areas, marking trails is illegal. See this article for an example. Marking a trail ...


12

If you want the quickest way to mark a trail, you could go for forestry marking paint. Some brands will advertize around 5 years of permanence. It requires careful placement of your marks so they are visible along the trail but this is true for any type of marker anyway. The advantages are: No need to carry physical marks No need to carry ancillaries like ...


10

Source: Wikimedia Commons Probably the easiest and most durable version is the use of cairns. Provided there is enough rocks around, they are easy to build, unaffected by bleaching of the sun and weather. If they are built big enough, they can even be seen at a certain level of snow.


8

Update: I have found some photos of sheep tracks which clearly show that they do not travel directly up a hill. The first first one of switchbacks comes from this website by Chris Collison, where it is claimed the sheep eroded the path over many generations, in other words, it is not man-made. The second shows that they prefer to follow a contour. Here is a ...


7

Permanent trails in NZ were marked with cut up bits of Venetian blinds - the aluminium ones and preferably white, nailed to trees with stainless steel (IIRC) nails. You can (could) often get these free from people renovating their homes. Now people seem to use triangular orange trail markers, as a more modern system - they go for about NZ$ 0.45 per marker ...


3

Do animal trails use switchbacks? = No How do you prove a negative? You can't, but consider the alternate question; "Why would an animal trail use a switch back?" Goat climbing cliffs maybe, but that is not so much of a trail as a search for good ledges All other trails are made by herbivores traveling between locations. These trails change with ...


1

Trees can be remarkably resilient. As explained by Davey, a tree care company: Healthy trees are tough, and when they’re drilled with a nail or screw, they’ll start a process called compartmentalization, which means they naturally heal the area around the wound and protect the rest of the tree from potential infection. So, for the best stability, choose a ...


1

It can hurt the tree, and allow disease to enter through the hole. The other reason not to use nails in trees is for humans, cutting into a nail with a chainsaw can be dangerous. It probably won't kill the tree right away, there are living trees in Yosemite that were marked with large blazes by the Calvary in the early part of the 1900s and that didn't kill ...


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