Hot answers tagged

60

Your planned hike sounds like it's within your physical capabilities. It will really come down to mental, rather than physical constraints. Do you enjoy challenging yourself, pushing through an unpleasant physical experience for the triumph of coming out the other side victorious? Or do you prefer taking a leisurely pace so you can enjoy the countryside, to &...


43

As a CDT through hiker, off-trail ultramarathon runner, and general fan of cross-country travel, I feel somewhat qualified to speak to this question. Moving off trail tends to be slower than moving on trail. Exactly how much slower depends on many factors. I generally walk 3 mph (~5 km/h) on a well maintained trail with reasonable (less than 1000 ft/mile ...


29

There are a couple of concerns to worry about, though neither is quite what your friends are saying: First is electrolytes - depending on how much/what you eat you might end up short. Electrolyte tablets to add to some of your water might be a good idea. I'm the opposite to you and don't like to be too hot, but I use them in the summer; I've been known to ...


18

To add to @csk's answer. It looks from the elevation profile that the Cleveland Way trail is fairly flat at one end. If possible I would aim to do the flatter end as the longer walking days rather than doing this over the hilly end, especially if you are not certain of your ability to walk such distances. From the linked page it looks like the hilly end is ...


15

The answers you seek are not easily quantifiable - for instance, a very fit experienced hiker might walk 50+ km a day on flat, open (i.e. not brush covered) terrain, but might only do 5-10 (or less) on steep, thickly forested hills. Some people can walk more than 100 km in a day - on urban streets/race tracks, but would be unlikely to sustain this day-after-...


11

On short (5-6 day) walks I can do about 26 miles a day as an average. For longer walks (months) I divide this by two, as a shorter daily distance is easier to sustain over a long period, mentally and physically. You need to find out your personal statistics for this. 40k in a day is certainly doable, but few walkers could do that day-on-day for a long ...


9

similar to the Highlands in Scotland or Scandinavian fjell Not in Germany. Although they share some similarities at a first glance, Scotland and Scandinavia have become two quite different landscapes due to a different history of human impact. In Scotland (and other hilly areas in the British-Irish isles), well over 99% of the original forest was removed ...


9

Carry your water in wide-mouth bottles rather than using a camelbak. Pack the bottles close to your body, so that your body heat will help to keep them from freezing.


8

We already have two good answers pointing out that you should start small. However, I would like to add another point--you also need to do shakedown hikes with the gear you actually will be carrying--including the max weight of consumables you will need. I get the impression you have it much easier in the consumable department than we (I'm in the United ...


8

Pretty much as per @Bob1. I would not start out on this GR without having experience (and good equipment) of camping 2-3 nights in a row minimum, several times. You should also be able to do a 15-20km walk with about a 25-30kg backpack and after having slowly built up the equipment. You don't need to be a super-hiker starting out, but you do have to ...


8

You may be overthinking this. You are not going to carry much luggage (I suppose). You are hiking in England, so the next village is not going to be far away. You will have cell phone coverage along the way. You will probably always have the option of just taking a taxi if you do not feel like hiking one morning. You are a normal and healthy person and you ...


7

This just doesn't look like it can be done safely. It looks like it's about 15 meters tall (diagonally), and the brush is thick enough to prevent you from just staying low down near the water. A fall from this height could easily result in serious injury or death. Soccer cleats or trekking poles will not help here. They will be no more stable than the ...


6

The structures you are seeing are not structures at all - they are the result of either deadfall (see last definition) or blow-down/windthrow, where trees (or large branches) that have died have then fallen over, either due to wind events or snow fall. These trees topple onto other trees, stripping them of bark and pushing them down and out of the canopy so ...


6

A lot of people tackle long distance walks like this in segments, at least until they're used to multi-day hiking. The opposite is through-hiking, but not many people can take several months off work. The GR5 looks doable in segments ranging from a long weekend to a couple of weeks. Thus after a couple of local trips to test your gear and yourself, you can ...


6

This is highly dependent on a few different factors. Where you are hiking How you behave while you are hiking When you are hiking I've done some hiking in the Eastern and Western US, and while I can't recall seeing a bear on the East Coast (although there's the general rule to hang bear bags with smellable items), I've got some anecdotes from a 2 week trip ...


6

Aconcagua, which apparently is non-technical if ascended from the Northern route and does not require axes or ropes. Aconcagua is 6,961 m high. The hike in starts from a village (Puente del Inca) at 2740 m, making the climb 4,221 m in altitude. It seems that it normally takes between 12 and 20 days to climb, mostly because of the need to acclimatize to the ...


5

In addition to @gerrit's answer: If you can dispense with elevation (and in consequence also with valleys) but look for open landscapes, there are some moors, e.g. the Hohe Venn at the Belgian border or also heaths, e.g. Lüneburger Heide or Colbitzer Heide. Disclaimer: I don't know them since I'm more a hills and forest person. Up in the Mittelgebirge are a ...


5

The effect of temperature on exercise performance has been studied in some detail. This paper nicely reviews a range of hypotheses as well as including experimental data. They seem to conclude that metabolic effects dominate, with the availability of glycogen being a key factor. Effectively your body is less efficient running hotter (and the internal ...


5

You have a couple of options: Buy a satellite internet terminal (Inmarsat's BGAN system is probably the market leader but there are alternatives e.g. ThurayaIP). These tend to be expensive (e.g. $1500 plus $150/month for 50MB data) and heavy (around 1kg though more expensive models are somewhat lighter). However they will work anywhere with a view of the ...


5

In more than forty years of hiking several times a year in the Sierra in Yosemite and in the vicinity of Yosemite, we have encountered black bears ten or fifteen times. None of them displayed agressive behavior, even the two times when we encountered a mother with cubs although both those times she unmistakeably warned us. We froze and the bear and cubs ...


5

I live on an inholding in the Santa Fe National Forest, eight miles by road to the boundary (and nearest neighbor), 4-5 miles as the crow flies to the closest boundary point. Most of the area is above 7000' elevation and is steeply sloped ponderosa forest. In 15 years we have never seen a mountain lion. We've seen some tracks in the snow, but never the cat ...


4

I had good success with self-made hiking food based on couscous and soy "ground beef" - this type of thing (no recommendation for this particular brand, just an example). Each meal gets packaged into two separate vacuum bags: one for the soy (and dried mushrooms, if part of the meal) and one for the couscous and other stuff. Prepare by putting the ...


4

If you can read French the "topoguide" from the FFR (fédération française de randonnée, French trekking association) is a good option both for planning and during walk (I don't think they cover the part of the GR5 outside of France and you need several to cover all the itinerary). They have information on accommodation, food supply and transport ...


4

While I love @Lucas Wojciechowski's answer, I'd also like to answer this from a different direction, as OP is asking about the distance covered in a single day. I think here the estimate of roughly 20-30 km per day (13-20 miles) is a reasonable base-line assumption given: you know you'll be on decent trails without excessive elevation you won't waste time ...


4

For the few day-hikes I did at around the freezing point of water, I still used a Camelbak-like thing (actually from Deuter). There was never a danger of freezing inside my backpack, but I kept it close to my back and more or less tightly wrapped in other gear. But most importantly, after the first hike where I experienced the tube freezing, I made sure to ...


4

A very useful (and not expensive) way to adjust a sleeping bag's insulation is a liner. This also reduces the need to wash the sleeping bag, prolonging its life. With access to even a basic sewing machine, liners are easy enough to make, if it's easier to get the fabric than a ready-made liner. There are several types: The cheapest liners are thin ...


4

I have a greater swiss mountain dog. I started by getting him used to camping with tarp in the backyard and sleeping in the van, we've also been doing a bit of winter camping in a friend's garden. He doesn't like sleeping away from home, but then he also doesn't likes being away from me. He anyways spends his nights outdoors, so temperature/fur is no problem....


3

Walked and floated miles on the San Gabriel, several times ; never seen a cotton mouth there. Two grandsons were with me who would have likely flushed them out. I have seen them in E TX a few times , they have not been aggressive as their reputation claims. More like copperheads which are common here ; That is , confident because they are not afraid of ...


3

I will give here some general guidelines for hiking: The best training for hiking is... hiking. But for a very long hike, training is somewhat secondary as you'll gain fitness on trail. If training is not mandatory, I think experience almost is: you should definitely go sleep in the wilds prior to your departure. You have to know your needs and start ...


3

When I go hiking, I keep a mug of evidence, as there are 2 reasons for this: Easy to get a mug The mug is always there, regardless of the situation, rest or walking. Therefore, I always use it. Many of my friends put the mug in the same side or top pocket. But this is everyone’s business. I used this mug TOAKS Titanium 450ml Double Wall Cup:


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