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36

It depends and is hard to generalize about. If river volume is seasonal (think late summer in temperate countries, especially with snow-capped mountains or places with a specific rainy season), you could hike on exposed riverbank during periods of low flow. This is the sweet spot and if it works well, it's really beneficial (see fgysin reinstate Monica 's ...


35

Depending on how much other stuff you will be carrying, a whole trumpet and case may be too heavy and/or bulky. Just take your mouthpiece and blow through it when you feel like it, on an easy part of the trail. Maybe not your prime mouthpiece - a spare one that would be less-upsetting to loose or damage. A brass mouthpiece weighs around 75 grams (2 2/3 ...


29

There are a couple of concerns to worry about, though neither is quite what your friends are saying: First is electrolytes - depending on how much/what you eat you might end up short. Electrolyte tablets to add to some of your water might be a good idea. I'm the opposite to you and don't like to be too hot, but I use them in the summer; I've been known to ...


27

For one, thank you for asking and planning to be considerate. I wouldn’t wholly throw away the idea of practicing while on a backpacking trip, particularly if you’re a professional, but there are definitely ways to be considerate. I generally don’t think that people would appreciate long periods of listening to someone practicing, regardless of skill level. ...


23

From my perspective, it depends on where you are backbacking/camping. And it's not other humans I would be concerned about primarily. If you are in a very remote setting where there are only very few or no other humans, then I would recommend to be careful with the noise that you make. This does not only apply to trumpeting. The wildlife in that remote area ...


23

Copper is about the same density as stainless. It is relatively toxic so is always coated for cooking. Copper and copper compounds are used for sea water boat hulls because it kills or repels barnacles, etc. The traditional pewter/tin coating on copper cookware can fairly easily be melted on an open fire leaving some bare copper. Stainless clad copper is ...


22

In the question, you have stated several false and-or dubious claims: Copper is lightweight Copper is more dense ("heavier") than all of the three listed alternatives; it has density of 8.9 g/cm3, which is higher than aluminum (2.7 g/cm3), steel (7.7 to 8.1 g/cm3) and titanium (4.5 g/cm3). Copper is the best heat conducter [sic] you can get ...


19

Serious heat related illness in wilderness medicine is broken up into two categories, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. This blog post from NOLS has a pretty good overview of the two (including signs & symptoms [S/Sx], and treatment). The information is similar to what would be covered in a WFA/WFR course regarding heat illness. That being said, I would ...


18

On rare occasions it can be easiest to walk in the river. I had this happen to me on a trek in the Rocky Mountains up near Banff / Lake Louise. The valley next to the river was old-growth forest mixed with flooding debris and borderline impassable. After hardly making headway during one morning, and calculating the time it would take us to walk the needed ...


18

You are correct that it is called scree. Depending on the incline and rock makeup it can be either relatively easy or almost impassable to cross. If you are traversing you want to pick a straight line across or with a slight "incline" since you inevitably will slide down a bit as you make your way across. I like to have a trekking pole on my ...


16

Copper cookware IS used for cooking (at least, in the mediterranean culture I am native to). For people familiar with this, it is considered obvious that: It is not lightweight at any rate. The copper is both denser than the steel and less rigid, so the same container must be made from thicker metal sheet. It HAS to be tin-coated. Tin coating is not very ...


12

Okay, I've made enough suggestions in the comments I figured I'd better summarize them in an "answer." It's not fully what you asked for; this is more of a summary of all the "almost what you want" options I and others have come up with. Maybe one of these suggestions will give you a new idea that you can improve on, of maybe one will ...


12

EDITED TO ADD: Please also read the other answer by cbeleites unhappy with SX about the risk of heavy metal contamination. The information in my original answer (below) is still accurate regarding microbes, but you also need to worry about heavy metals, and a water filter will not remove those. Apparently the low pH of bog water makes the risk much higher ...


11

The Leave-no-trace tag in the question implies that you are familiar with the concept. Have you actually read the Leave No Trace principles? I'll quote from Leave No Trace Canada's 7th principle page: Be Considerate of Others One of the most important components of outdoor ethics is to maintain courtesy toward other visitors. It helps everyone enjoy their ...


10

The limit isn't temperature, it's heat index. Since your body cools itself by sweating, you need to take the humidity into account when figuring out if you're going to overheat. As an example, 10% humidity and 41°C (what you might find at Arches National Park) will heat you about the same as 100% humidity and 28°C (which you might find in the Everglades), ...


9

If you genuinely have no one who you can use as an SAR contact you could purchase a either a GPS SPOT device or a PLB which can be used to emit an SOS signal that will be detected in an emergency even outside cellphone coverage areas. Remember your SAR contact doesn’t need to be a friend. They can be a work colleague or a neighbour. You don’t even need to ...


7

This is highly dependent on a few different factors. Where you are hiking How you behave while you are hiking When you are hiking I've done some hiking in the Eastern and Western US, and while I can't recall seeing a bear on the East Coast (although there's the general rule to hang bear bags with smellable items), I've got some anecdotes from a 2 week trip ...


7

You don't need to orient the map at all, this can all be worked out irrespective of where actual North is. You would generally only need to use this method if planning a route or for triangulation to determine your location. It is handy to orient the map to North for navigation and if you want to determine which peaks you are looking at, but it isn't ...


6

Aconcagua, which apparently is non-technical if ascended from the Northern route and does not require axes or ropes. Aconcagua is 6,961 m high. The hike in starts from a village (Puente del Inca) at 2740 m, making the climb 4,221 m in altitude. It seems that it normally takes between 12 and 20 days to climb, mostly because of the need to acclimatize to the ...


5

I live on an inholding in the Santa Fe National Forest, eight miles by road to the boundary (and nearest neighbor), 4-5 miles as the crow flies to the closest boundary point. Most of the area is above 7000' elevation and is steeply sloped ponderosa forest. In 15 years we have never seen a mountain lion. We've seen some tracks in the snow, but never the cat ...


5

In more than forty years of hiking several times a year in the Sierra in Yosemite and in the vicinity of Yosemite, we have encountered black bears ten or fifteen times. None of them displayed agressive behavior, even the two times when we encountered a mother with cubs although both those times she unmistakeably warned us. We froze and the bear and cubs ...


5

I must agree with Ben Crowell--I am not aware of anything of the sort in the US. The closest I can think of is the Wonderland trail--it circles a mountain, there are designated places to spend the night but it's backcountry camping, you're packing in and out everything. There four points on the trail you can cache supplies (but you can only use three as ...


5

Peatland/bog water has lots of humic acids. They lower pH (see also @SherwoodBotsford's answer), and they are chelating agents. Both low pH and chelating mean that they tend to mobilize heavy metal ions, As-species behave in a very complex manner (see e.g https://www.publish.csiro.au/EN/EN05025 for a start). I'd therefore avoid drinking bog/peat water in ...


5

If you haven’t done much hiking before: Don’t underestimate how exhausting it can be. Depending on the hike and level of fitness there is a very real chance you’ll be too exhausted to do any serious, beneficial practice. I agree with the other answers that playing the trumpet could seriously annoy other people. However, it very much depends on time and ...


5

There are definitely new trails being cut in your area. In general, you should check the Washington Trails Association website to find this kind of information: https://www.wta.org/ You can see some of the projects underway, and even get involved, by visiting the Find a Work Party page. A few of the new trails listed there include Mount Spokane - Trail 183 ...


5

As a hiker, rather than mountain biker, I'd be careful about taking hikers' words for it. In Vancouver's North Shore mountains there are tons of mixed-use trails, many initially put in place by mountain bikers. Doesn't stop hikers from repeat whining in local media. Me? I occasionally run/walk these trails, so happy someone put them down and I find looking ...


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