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1

I'm going to go out on a limb and give a sort of non-TGO answer because it seems like you already know the answer and this is more psychological. So, my attempt is humor. If we look at the data (unfortunately death statistics in the US is now considered private, so I'm using pretty old data, which can be found here. https://www.wemjournal.org/article/...


1

If you're already hiking, I am not sure you'd gain by losing a certain degree of caution. I am not super comfortable hiking by myself around twilight in BC, due to cougars. I do it, if I have to, but am a bit anxious while doing it. People who have lived here all their life here worry, even though actual deaths or even attacks (we get 1-2 a year) with 4M ...


2

A lot of it is just by doing it. Both species are quite low density, and the number of wild animal deaths/injuries are very small. Regions that are dangerous for bears are those where they are very familiar with human presence and associate it with snacks, and very remote areas where they haven't seen humans at all, and have no fear of them. Wolves are ...


2

When it comes to flat tarp shape, there is no right or wrong answer. Both shapes can be used to make simple roof, lean-to-type or a fully enclosed tent-like structures. There is a ton of information about different pitches at: http://equipped.com/tarp-shelters.htm There is also this question about tarps and wind: What is a good tarp setup for very high ...


4

I have tarped for most of my outdoor experience. One year on a bet (be careful what you say at the pub...) I spend a full year under a tarp in the bush near my home. Right now I have a silicone coated 9x12 ripstop nylon tarp. Marketed as 'aquatarp' on Amazon. But for a small weight penalty, the coated woven poly tarps you can get at Big Box Stores work. ...


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