New answers tagged

13

Serious heat related illness in wilderness medicine is broken up into two categories, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. This blog post from NOLS has a pretty good overview of the two (including signs & symptoms [S/Sx], and treatment). The information is similar to what would be covered in a WFA/WFR course regarding heat illness. That being said, I would ...


4

First off, congrats on the "alpine route"! I think you'll find after doing more of these that the slope pictured will feel a lot more comfortable for you. Ice axes are not just for ice! You say Since it is rock I'm not sure how useful it would be to have a pickaxe ready to arrest one's fall. Actually, it could be quite useful, especially because ...


16

You are correct that it is called scree. Depending on the incline and rock makeup it can be either relatively easy or almost impassable to cross. If you are traversing you want to pick a straight line across or with a slight "incline" since you inevitably will slide down a bit as you make your way across. I like to have a trekking pole on my ...


2

Before drinking from a stream, check your map to see where that stream comes from. Does it flow through a settlement or even worse past something industrial? Does it come from a lake? Could be polluted with anything, including things you might not be able to get rid of by filtering or cooking. If you have a choice, avoid! (if this is a survival situation: ...


1

The problem is not just whether the trail is maintained or not. Usually people walking press a little bit the ground and over time a hard layer is formed on the surface, bicycles often have the opposite effect. It depends on the type of soil, on the humidity on the amount of stones and so on, many variable influence how easily it is compacted and how easily ...


5

I believe this answer might open up a broader perspective. I am from India where there aren't many (any, if at all) biking trails as such. However, there are plenty of hiking trails. I have been trekking for about 15 years now so I think I might add to the opinion of the hiker you received. I have done little bit of mountain-cycling as well. I come from the ...


5

As a hiker, rather than mountain biker, I'd be careful about taking hikers' words for it. In Vancouver's North Shore mountains there are tons of mixed-use trails, many initially put in place by mountain bikers. Doesn't stop hikers from repeat whining in local media. Me? I occasionally run/walk these trails, so happy someone put them down and I find looking ...


3

I came in here as a musician from this question on music, so I leave the hiking relative aspect to others. As for the need to keep the chops in shape, you could just bring your mouth piece. This does not produce that much sound as with the instrument. My brother has a plastic mouth piece lying the car, and he sometimes blows it while driving... An even ...


5

There are definitely new trails being cut in your area. In general, you should check the Washington Trails Association website to find this kind of information: https://www.wta.org/ You can see some of the projects underway, and even get involved, by visiting the Find a Work Party page. A few of the new trails listed there include Mount Spokane - Trail 183 ...


2

Trumpeting while backpacking? Do not see a problem with it, but please remain considerate of others. Hunting horns have been in use for centuries and are still in use in certain countries. It is a tradition. Nevertheless, one should be respectful of trumpeting in and around campsite, where others may get annoyed easily. Many hikers and campers appreciate the ...


11

The Leave-no-trace tag in the question implies that you are familiar with the concept. Have you actually read the Leave No Trace principles? I'll quote from Leave No Trace Canada's 7th principle page: Be Considerate of Others One of the most important components of outdoor ethics is to maintain courtesy toward other visitors. It helps everyone enjoy their ...


-1

In Bear Country it is encouraged to make noise while hiking, so it would be OK there. It might be a bit hazardous to play while walking on rough trails. A friend played trumpet in a marching band, but the only hazards were in parades where they were behind the horses.


5

If you haven’t done much hiking before: Don’t underestimate how exhausting it can be. Depending on the hike and level of fitness there is a very real chance you’ll be too exhausted to do any serious, beneficial practice. I agree with the other answers that playing the trumpet could seriously annoy other people. However, it very much depends on time and ...


23

From my perspective, it depends on where you are backbacking/camping. And it's not other humans I would be concerned about primarily. If you are in a very remote setting where there are only very few or no other humans, then I would recommend to be careful with the noise that you make. This does not only apply to trumpeting. The wildlife in that remote area ...


35

Depending on how much other stuff you will be carrying, a whole trumpet and case may be too heavy and/or bulky. Just take your mouthpiece and blow through it when you feel like it, on an easy part of the trail. Maybe not your prime mouthpiece - a spare one that would be less-upsetting to loose or damage. A brass mouthpiece weighs around 75 grams (2 2/3 ...


4

A campground in the evening has aspects of a confined space; once can of course suddenly go flashlight-hiking or drive away1 but if you've started a fire or settled in for the night, one can feel constrained to remain. Another person then injecting the last possibly imaginable sound into this situation may charm some folks and bother others. But please ...


94

This is just a bad idea. We don't go backpacking in order to hear other people's music. We do it in order to make contact with nature and experience a serene, quiet environment. The idea of practicing your trumpet is objectionable for the same reason that it would be objectionable for someone to bring a music player and play recorded pop music. I really don'...


27

For one, thank you for asking and planning to be considerate. I wouldn’t wholly throw away the idea of practicing while on a backpacking trip, particularly if you’re a professional, but there are definitely ways to be considerate. I generally don’t think that people would appreciate long periods of listening to someone practicing, regardless of skill level. ...


1

How can I make our hiking trip fun and more enjoyable for them? I've been doing hiking for years and love it, but also learned that not all hiking trips are equally fun. In order to improve the experience you want to: Don't hike in rainy weather. Even a few raindrops can sour the groups mood, especially if they don't have good equipment. Rain hiking is for ...


3

I have not been to Sarek, but in lieu of answers from people with that experience I can offer a few suggestions from following retired tracks or going off-track/out of season in the Kebnekaise area and some satellite images to compare with. I expect you have a reasonable level of experience - it sounds like you are aware of your own abilities/limitations. ...


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