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10

The solvay biwak is solely an emergency shelter. There is an emergency radio available. So if you sleep there without declaring an emergency (even if just to inform the authorities) you have to expect to be fined (the locals are very strict and fines not negligible). In August you cannot expect snow around the hut (though you might get lucky and it can snow ...


8

You may also want to consider the Slovak side of the Tatra Mountains. Liptovský Mikuláš is a good base to do hiking in all three parts of the resort (Western, High, and Low Tatras), which can be combined with swimming in the termal waters (Bešeňová, Tatralandia). Several smaller peaks with excellent views are located around (Poludnica, 1548; Siná, 1560; ...


7

I went to this area about 6 years ago. We started in Zakopane and did a couple of loops staying at the mountain huts. While its probably possible to stay in Zakopane I think it would restrict you a lot in what you can do. For example Rysy itself is about 20km from Zakopane would be a big round trip in a day. There are some buses which I seem to remember ...


6

Yes, absolutely, that's how the majority of the tourists do it. The huts wouldn't have had enough space to accommodate even a fraction of the hikers if all of them wanted to sleep there. Personally, I live in Cracow (2 hours drive from Zakopane) and I have no problems with going for one-day hiking trips in Tatras with riding from Cracow in the morning and ...


5

You have actually quoted the right answer already. I missed it the first time I read your post. same­[-]byns gemensamma kassa This means collective funds of the Sami village (My translation, check google for a laugh).


5

I would check with Svenska Turistföreningen (STF). Their contact details are bottom left on the linked page. They have answered in English when I tried and have details about when bridges marked on maps are taken down for the winter and laid out again for the Summer season in the Kebnekaise area, for example. I would then also ask at the local tourist/fell ...


4

Fjellstyrene.no might lead you to the right fjellstyre and their website with more information about huts here is also a good start for finding open huts.. https://utelivet.wordpress.com/bubasen/ [Edit] Still not being a full overview, there is another site from Statskog, the state owned land and forest enterprise, that has published a PDF OVERVIEW with ...


4

I think a better translation would make the meaning obvious. "Kassa" here means "fund". ie a "kassakåta" is a hut funded by the village, not by an individual or a family.


4

Why not try the Wilder Kaiser, it's not in Innsbruck, only some 55mins drive, but it's pretty dame awesome and very kid friendly! More than 400km of walking paths make the Wilder Kaiser mountains an absolute gem for hiking holidays. Trails include accurate directions and approximate walk times. Hiking from hut to hut There is a remarkably diverse paradise ...


3

The "Tour de Mont Blanc" is a famous trek around the whole Mont Blanc massive. My wife and me walked it some years ago, accommodation was partly in huts, partly in some "Gîtes d'étape" or cheap hostels. I am sure you can just pick a 3 days section out of the tour which has the difficulty you prefer. You can find comprehensive information about the tours and ...


2

In the region managed by CAI Vigezzo, there are actually many bivaccos (unstaffed shelters) that are open year round. As most of those were not on either the Swiss topographic map, or Openstreetmap, or online sources I consulted prior to departure, I will list them here. During my hike 2019-10-25/28, I passed by: Alpe Croso Fuori, OPEN, basic Basic ...


2

I seem to remember being told that Italian huts will have an emergency shelter room as well. In any case, this emergency shelter may not be meant for people who stay there over night during a planned trip: it is meant for proper emergencies. I've seen signs saying "to stay while not staffed, please contact (phone number of someone from the local CAI ...


1

All over the Alps the huts and bivouacs can be divided into: available to anyone when unstaffed (some require key and registration, some not) available only in emergency when unstaffed open all year round You have to check each one individually. For huts on the Swiss side, Swiss Alpine Club website provides all the information: https://www.sac-cas.ch/en/...


1

I forgot to post what we ended up doing here, so I'll do that now (better late than never) Basically, we slept two nights in Hottinger Alm, which is really close to Innsbruck. We took the "Nordkette” to Hungersberg, and from there we walked to Umbruggler Alm, had lunch, and continued on to Hottinger Alm. It's uphill, but the stop along the way made it ...


1

Always get the most recently printed maps before you head up. Hopefully it's updated with the latest information. Obviously if a hut has burned down a week ago it'll still be on the map. But a year later it should definitely be updated.


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