38

All of the resources that I can find say that it should be done with the screw tip pointing up and the hanger below with up to a twenty-degree angle from horizontal. Contrary to what you might think, the best angle for the screws is slightly upward, meaning the hanger is slightly lower than the teeth in the ice. This counterintuitive method is ...


15

Ice screws have a tendency for pressure melting if constantly loaded over some time. Therefore if you build your fixed point belay system and and keep it under more or less constant load while belaying your partner, the screw might start to migrate as the ice below it melts slowly and refreezes above the screw. By this, a screw that was close to bomb-proof ...


10

The answer is in this video: https://youtu.be/seCiupa4I6U?t=1m2s I'm not sure if it's the same traverse as the OP posted, but I'd bet on it. The thing that looks like a biner between the columns is indeed a biner, probably from an ice/snow anchor. The holes (especially the large one) are due to this biner. What happens is that when the leader requires slack ...


10

I will only focus on signs to assess the quality of a placed ice screw. There are many factors that influence the outcome like the location, temperature, ... but they deserve an answer of their own. The most important thing is, that the screw is placed all the way in solid ice. On the surface you can judge this easily. The deeper parts are assessed by what ...


9

I think that rope management at your harness (in both rock and ice climbing) is an extension of managing your rope while you're clipping into your pro. You carry different lengths of draws and slings so you can keep your rope as straight as possible to reduce drag and avoid popping out all your pro when you weight the rope. If you're climbing left of your ...


8

TL;DR Vertical oriented V-threads (A-threads) are significantly stronger than horizontally aligned V-threads. The following numbers should not be taken at face value: Different test configurations were performed, but it is not clearly stated which are used to come up with these numbers. Tests by Beverly and Attaway showed an increase in mean failure load of ...


7

Will Gadd's book Ice & Mixed Climbing states that if you mess up the first attempt at a V-thread, start over in clean ice. This includes if your screw holes intersect only partway down the hole, the two holes didn't intersect, or the distance between the holes isn't large enough. Practicing making V-threads on the ground is much better than trying to ...


7

It depends. Mix climbing on granite in Norway with Ice climbing occasionally. That means you have mostly rock while on the mixed climb? If this is the case I would advise to get a mixed blade. What are drawbacks of using Ice blade instead of Mix blade? Ice blades are very thin and have a conical shape. Even when they are brand-new you should most ...


6

Ice blades are designed for penetration, mixed blades are modified to help you also get a good bite on rock without doing to much damage to your tips. Will Gadd–who is considered to be the best ice and mixed climber in the world (watch him climb the hardest mixed climb ever here)–has this to say in his book: For mixed climbing I generally keep my pick ...


6

Addition to ShemSeger's answer, from way back in my mind: A concave spot in the ice is stronger than a convex spot, given equal ice quality. The ice should be deeper than the screw is long, so the screw doesn't push the ice away from the rock.


5

The Basics Tying in, ropework, belaying, commands and common sense transfer quite well from rock climbing. At least from trad. Someone with rock climbing experience could certainly top rope on ice or follow an experienced leader with only some brief instructions. The climbing Ice climbing technique is quite different from (most) rock climbing. A rock ...


5

There are some helpful basics like tieing into a rope and belaying that directly transfer from rock to ice climbing as they are the same regardless of the conditions. Further transferable skills mainly depend on what kind of rock climbing you do. Sports climbing is a lot less helpful than trad climbing. Trusting your own protection is an essential skill in ...


5

Good Ice Sounds obvious, but that's the answer, you need to learn how to identify good solid ice for all your screw placements. The best ice is the thickest ice you can find, so you can place your longest screws; clear and blue will be the most solid, while the worst ice is cloudy or brown, full of bubbles (aerated) and 'crunches' when you poke it, or has ...


4

The single point setup was developed to aid in very high technical levels of mixed climbing. Dual points can make it hard to keep the crampon on small rock holds. Also in certain kinds of ice, the monopoint can get a better grip. The various other setups are attempts to make a compromise between getting full grip in the ice and staying stable on rock. My ...


3

Finite Element Analysis Ice Screw Analysis by John Gregel shows computer models of the stresses applied to an idelaized screw in differing strength ice blocks at three angles: +15° hanger higher than tip / ‘downwards’ in Charlie Brumbaugh’s answer 0° horizontal -15° hanger lower than tip / ‘upwards’ in Charlie’s answer It shows the most obvious difference ...


3

Look for a pack where the ice axe is on the side of the back. Strapping snowshoes to the back of a pack is fairly trivial: usually I rig a loop at the bottom of the pack about 4" in diameter. Run the tails of the shoes through the loop, and a bungie cord areound the body of the pack hooking into the toes. (I'm using Ojibway style wood and babiche ...


3

I believe you should search for backpacks that are specifically marketed for snow-shoeing/ backcountry skiing and check if they allow carrying ice tools as well. I haven't tested it myself, but it looks like Osprey Kode 30 could be a good fit for you. Well, at least if you don't require a bigger bag. Also, the post seems a bit old, not sure if they still ...


2

The UK company Rab have a reputation for selling jackets and tops with longish sleeves. I'm 6'3" (I don't know about 'wingspan') and find quite a lot of their jackets/tops have sleeves more than long enough for me, perhaps a bit too long in some cases! Also, here is a link to Rab's sizing guide, which also gives sleeve lengths: sizing guide


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