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12

Hiking in the Iceland highlands/roads when there's snow on the ground is certainly allowed, although you'd find travel much easier on skis. Be aware in the winter/spring the roads and marker / sign posts are totally buried in snow. The mountain rescue service in Iceland will be happy to rescue you should you get into trouble - register with ICESAR in ...


10

about excess rope, rope length and how to split rope please see: https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7025/2653 As you see on the picture, the two ends of the rope is devided evenly between the first and the last rope team member. If you don't know this, I guess you don't know how to rescue someone in case of crevasse fall. You should really learn it by ...


9

Looks like a bit of Googling found the answer I was after... I'm not 100% sure this is definative, but it does suggest that search and rescue is free. http://www.vagabondjourney.com/travelogue/iceland-search-and-rescue/ Can anyone else confirm this?


8

I Googled and found there is a least one store (top return) that is open daily from 9AM to 5PM. It also offers 24/7 pickup and drop off of rental supplies. So yes you can get gas cartridges on a Sunday in Reykjavik. Their address is as follows: Barónsstígur 5 101 Reykjavik - Iceland Tel. +354 647 0569


8

As already stated several times: If you know what you need to do on a glacier, you know what material to take. The other way round does not work: Just having the necessary gear will not insure proper crevasse rescue. So your first step is to take a course or find someone experienced to show you. This is the only recommended way to do it, but that is of ...


8

Iceland has some of the remotest landscapes in Europe and its not difficult to find solitude and choose a hiking route where there are neither vehicles nor people if you so wish. With a population of only 300'000 in a country the same size as Ireland, it is 80% uninhabited and very easy to enter a completely remote and untouched hiking destination. As an ...


8

From The U.S. National Weather Service, Turn Around Don't Drown® Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other thunderstorm related hazard. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that over half of all flood-related drownings occur when a vehicle is driven into hazardous flood water. The next highest ...


8

If you wanted to avoid the 4WD areas* my suggestion would be to make your start point for a multi-day hike at one of the furthest reaches of a 4WD trail. And if that trail is one of the lesser used ones, you should be well away from petrol-based signs of civilisation rapidly. That said, with the ongoing popularity of volcano watching in Iceland, you'll ...


7

Since Iceland has the "right to roam" similar to other Nordic countries, you're virtually allowed to go wherever you want. You probably won't even be able to see the road due to the snowcover, so it would be weird if you could go everywhere except there :) so I wouldn't worry. Even when there's no snow, there's very little traffic. The busiest highland ...


7

Skirt. If you care a lot about wind and sand, then you should look for a tent with a skirt - many moutaneering-specific tents do have one. But skirt does increase the weight, so there's no right decision. I'd suppose a tent, that has a very small gap between a... uh, upper part, and a ground. Then you can just put some snow or sand there, to close the gap ...


6

The presence of a ford in a river is a local condition: it's a point in the flow where the river has leveled out, producing a wide, slow, shallow flow. In addition, a ford generally has a hard bottom, either naturally or through "improvement" with imported gravel. The presence of a ford at one point says absolutely nothing about the fordability of that ...


6

As it happens, the easiest way to cross from the north is on the ice of the Þjórsarjökull glacier. The glacier in this area is almost completely flat. There are very few crevasses or other features, and those that do exist are shallow and easily visible. Þjórsárjökull is the lowest part of Hofsjökull, at the eastern end, getting nearly down to 600 metre. ...


5

Most (main) roads are marked with yellow poles. Other roads might be marked by stacks of rocks or the simple fact that there's a winding patch of less rough terrain forming an obvious trail. If you're unsure of road markings use a proper gps unit with trail maps to verify your location. The following points are mentioned on this website: Check out ...


5

This is from the well known trekker Andrew Skurka, who did an East/West traverse that would cross similar terrain to your proposed route. Question: I have asked around and everywhere I hear that water is sufficiently available in all areas, but I keep wondering about this ‘desert’ area that you also talk about. The area around Askja seems so dry and ...


5

I think your best bet would be to look at their other National Parks, Vatnajökull is the biggest (It covers 13% of Iceland), but apparently Snæfellsjökull National Park is Iceland's main attraction: Like Rory said in his answer, you're likely going to have to 4x4 to the end of the road to find a good vehicle-free area to hike in. That's what Bear Grylls did ...


5

Personally, I think that most decent backpacking tents will be fine for Iceland. The temperature is not extremely cold and you should be fine as long as you have a semi-decent sleeping bag. One thing I would recommend is getting a tent that can be self supporting (i.e. doesn't need pegging out to stand up) this can be very useful if you have to camp on ...


4

According to the article by Iceland Review (mentioned in a comment to Simon Hodgson by Paul Lydon), presently (summer 2015) there is no regular charge for search and rescue in Iceland. In exceptional cases, where people have to be rescued from closed roades or were not in real danger, they are charged. Due to a huge increase of S&R calls the teams ...


3

In March Iceland would still be covered in snow and ice with daily highs of 3*c on the south coast and an average temperature of around 0*c. Most days it snows. Daily High and Low Temperature in March for Reykjavík, Iceland You might be able to ski tour if you have the skills to survive in arctic weather, but I highly doubt you'd be able to hike, even on ...


3

I would say from late August to mid-September. However, the exact timing, the color intensity and duration varies greatly from year to year and is impossible to predict. If you want to maximize your possibilities of seeing autumn colors, I'd say take a 2-week trip on the first half of September while keeping in mind that hot and dry summer, if one should ...


2

You need to know whether the magnetic declination you have was measured from Grid North or from True North. If you have a Grid declination, then you align the north arrow of the compass with Grid North (the frame of the map) before adjusting for declination. If you have a True declination, then you align the north arrow of the compass with True North (the ...


2

On my last trip to Iceland I got the tip to look around at the air port for gas cartridges. Often people who are leaving drop their stuff there. Also hostels might be a good place to search for. The biggest selection I probably saw, was at the campsite in Reykjavik.


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