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11

Building an igloo requires: the right snow training to know what the right snow is a snow knife some practice building the walls so that they taper in yet are supported as you go In the absence of training and practice, which I would posit is very rare, go with a quinzy instead. You dig snow and throw it into a big pile. You let that sit for a bit to ...


8

Not as real as the danger of death by exposure and hypothermia while outside the igloo. Your risk of asphyxiation in a snow shelter depends largely on its size, and the number of people inside it. People have been living in igloos for hundreds if not thousands of years, and not just for one night or two at a time, but as permanent dwellings also. Igloos ...


7

The danger is not only suffocation due to lack of oxygen, but also poisoning due to too much carbon dioxide in the air. Normal air has 21% oxygen; humans will safely survive down to ~15%. Maybe 10% oxygen is barely survivable for a few hours. Mountaineers might have an advantage here, they regularly survive Everest, which has ⅓ of the oxygen at sea level ...


1

It's a real danger, especially as the night goes on. Snow has plenty of air in it, and is somewhat breathable, but the moisture from your breath and the heat you generate is going to starting melting the snow and then freezing, so that there is an ice shell on the walls and ceiling. This is especially a problem in snow caves. However, so long as you have an ...


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