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13

After spending quite some time researching what you can do to avoid tiger encounters, the best advise I can give you is–don't put yourself in a position where you might encounter a tiger. Tigers are man-eaters, estimates put fatalities due to tiger attacks at about 373,000 since 1800. The only truly effective safety measure is a big gun. Measures to ...


11

The part of the answer may sound very specific to India, and at some part indeed I would try and be more generic. (Specific to India) When you say feline, and specifically in India, you are more likely to encounter a Leopard than a Tiger, even if its a Tiger reserve. If I can relate some data and my experiences about trekking in Tiger Reserves (Rather, to ...


10

Disclaimer: I am no expert in this field, and I must admit that I had to go through various documents (PDFs) that I had archived over a period of time, but was too lazy to understand them fully. I usually refer to sections that I want to know about. And I have never memorised this information. First thing, it's never too clear for any veteran trekker in ...


9

Yes, the bite of a common krait (Bungarus caeruleus) can be painless. It is a venomous snake found on the subcontinent of India and is also known as the Indian krait. Kraits are nocturnal, therefore instances with humans most often occur at night and therefore the snake may also not be seen. Source: Common krait (Wikipedia)


9

Common Sparrows, which are the State Bird of Delhi, and also of Bihar, have indeed been on a massive decline in India in recent years. What you're seeing is not a fluke. It's happening in many urban areas in India, and is a serious problem. Although many studies have been done over the years, the largest group in your area which is currently involved in ...


9

The quick answer to a question of credible sources for solo trekking trails is, "NO", there are no sources which can be completely relied on for this kind of information (at least for the western ghats part). The following set of attributes might help you in deciding upon heading out solo in the western ghats: Safety: The western ghats are safe for ...


8

Yes, for Har-ki-doon trek you need a local forest permit. Hiring a guide is not a mandatory thing, but recommended. The guide will take care of campsites and arranging food at a fair bargain. First things first. You can book a cab from Dehradun to Sankri villege. On the way you would pass through a place called Naitwar (Tagged Netwar on google maps). The ...


8

When I've had to clean spray paint from remote destinations, we've used chemical paint removers in spray bottles and scrub brushes. Do not do this on a historic site without permission from whoever manages it. There is a very good chance you will cause at least slight damage while removing the spray paint, and if you are careless, you can make the ...


6

I love this question and thus I've researched a little bit. Just as you've wished I don't talk about the encounter with a monkey or something. I just show off the different races and their ability to adapt to humans in their territory. What I wanted to make clear: I absolutely assume that the reader doesn't provoke the animals in any way! Introduction ...


6

I've hiked the Ghats in Maharashtra, Tamilnadu and Kerala without issues, but did take sensible precautions. The most dangerous animals are gaur (wild relatives of cattle), boar, snakes, and elephants. Each requires its own precautions, but most will happily get out of your way if they know that you are coming. In areas with known Gaur populations, use ...


5

I highly recommend the Pocket Naturalist Guides from Waterford Press. I have no affiliation with the company, and I don't purchase directly from their website. I'm recommending them because we use them for birding and learning about nature both in the backyard, and in our travels. I think they easily meet your criteria. They're folded to give you a good ...


4

At a guess? A change in architecture. Pigeons favor cliff ledges as nesting sites; they'll happily build nests on window ledges as a substitute for natural cliffs. Sparrows favor cavities: tree hollows, the eaves of roofs, and other somewhat-enclosed areas. If there's been a trend of replacing traditional houses with high-rise apartments, I'd expect a ...


4

Milam glacier falls under the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve limits. In case you want to enter a national park limits, you will need a permit from the forest department. Additionally, since parts of NDBR fall under the protected areas act, you'll need a protected areas permit to enter the Milam glacier section. The PAP can be obtained from the MHA, Dehradun. ...


4

There several apps for phones that would help a person, eBird by Cornell Lab (This one is supposed to be worldwide) Birds of India Specifically for birds in India The Audubon Bird Guide App (Limited to North America) Merlin Bird ID App (North America and Europe, will also help identify the bird from a picture) Websites, Bird Identification Guide (India) ...


3

According to the Himalayan Journal, it was July 14th, 1985. Rimo III (7233 m -23,730 ft) Wilkinson and Fotheringham 14 July NE ridge From east via South Rimo glacier. EXPLORING 'THAT VALLEY'-TERONG by HARISH KAPADIA


3

I did this trek in 2012 on a guided tour organized by IndiaHikes. There was a large flood in 2013 in Uttarakhand which, from what I've heard, affected the trek significantly and made it harder. As to your question, a few pointers: The trek itself was relatively easy back in 2012. If I was more familiar with trekking in India, I might have done it without ...


1

It is very hard to tell from the poor photo, but I suspect that it is a member of the Tunicates, a class of marine animals that includes things like sea-squirts. More specifically I would guess that it is a member of the Pyrosomes, which are more commonly found in warm waters, such as are found off Goa. Pyrosomes are actually colonial organisms composed of ...


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