Hot answers tagged

17

For wounds with heavy bleeding or that are deep, the standard practice is to: Apply direct pressure to the wound. Elevate the injury to decrease blood flow. In short, if the flow of blood is high enough that it won't clot then you want to impede the bleeding by whatever means possible. As mentioned elsewhere, tourniquets are a last resort, where the loss ...


15

Self-assessment is difficult because your level of consciousness (LOC) may be impaired. Unfortunately, one's own state of mind is also very difficult to self-assess. I'll list here a brief overview of some of the "self-checks" you can do, but (as I'm sure you're already aware), getting a second person to check you out as soon as possible will help ensure you ...


14

In addition to the suggestions above, regular use of walking or trekking poles are a great help in alleviating knee and hip problems.


14

Rather than try to answer the personal part of your question, which as Liam said needs a doctor's attention to answer properly, I shall reply to the more general title: Can a Finger Pulley injury be predicted / anticipated? In an absolute sense I do not believe it can be. In a relative sense it is caused high stress on these "pulleys" so avoiding hard use ...


11

To quote from the Wilderness First Responder manual, Large objects found impaled in a wound should be left in place if you can get to a medical facility with relative ease. Yanking on an object can stimulate serious bleeding and damage underlying structures, especially if the object is impaled in a body cavity, such as the chest, abdomen or head ... ...


8

Obviously, this is a scenario that could be avoided with proper planning and better practices. The best solutions would have been preemptive. Regardless, this scenario is where my question is to be asked from. (...) Assuming a normal load out (normal clothing, some water, a knife, etc.), what do you do to survive and make it back to a safe place? I'd ...


8

"tight bandage/band" = Tourniquet. An emergency tourniquet is generally used as a last resort, especially in civilian applications, for all blood flow below the application of an emergency tourniquet is stopped, and can subsequently kill the tissue, leading to eventual loss of the limb below application. Never attempt to apply a tourniquet unless you are ...


7

You are experiencing a strain of the LCL, the Lateral Collateral Ligament that connects your femur to your fibula with IT Band syndrome. The mechanics of going downhill when hiking are significantly different than up. When taking a step down from a height of more than 6 inches, the femur tends to stay perpendicular to the ground, under the hip joint while ...


7

Having suffered similar on a marathon I had to run in freezing rain once (ending up with not just large areas with the skin chafed off entirely, but also deep cuts into my thigh muscles from the stitching!) I can heartily recommend combining very supportive underwear with non-slip, stretch leggings. This way the only rubbing will be between the underwear ...


7

If I had a 22lr and if it was legal, I would consider putting it out of its misery with that, otherwise you did the correct thing. When there is no practical way to save it, and you only risk injury to yourself then the correct thing is to keep yourself safe and stay beyond where it could hurt you and potentially give you rabies (even non-rabid dogs can ...


6

Orient yourself to the situation. Admit that you're injured and lost, but stay calm. Don't fool yourself into feeling invincible, but recognize that you are in fact strong enough to survive. If your current location and situation is a source of danger, immediately move to a safe location. It's better to be alive and lost than dead and not lost. Stabilize ...


6

Water tight is subject to lots of variable. As you mention just staying out of the water is the least risk. There are Waterproof Transparent Dressings, a good example is Nexcare™ Tegaderm™ Waterproof Transparent Dressing It lists among its attributes "Seals out water, dirt and germs to help prevent infection" I have seen this stuff in use, it can stay in ...


6

Small addendum to the excellent answers already present: Never release a tourniquet unless you have received expert instruction on doing so. If the patient who received a tourniquet does not receive medical attention within a few hours, it is likely that the patient will loose the affected limb. Therefore, before applying a tourniquet, make sure that a ...


6

Been there done that, I would just wrap a smaller width piece of climber's tape around the finger and then take extra care to smooth the end down as usually, that's where it starts to come unraveled. I would make sure to try and get most of the tape around the middle piece of your finger in between the joints as otherwise when you bend your finger it will ...


5

To the direct question, as indicated in other answers, tourniquets are placed towards the torso from the site of injury. There's been a major initiative in the US known as "Stop the Bleed." You'll find a significant number of authoritative trainings and recommendations, including the use of tourniquets. https://www.dhs.gov/stopthebleed. Other answers ...


5

I just got back from hiking Inyo county Bishop Ca. area call Sage flat and when coming down my outside knees began to hurt and by the time we got down it was hard to take steps. I hoped over night it would feel better so i could hike the next day, It did and we decided to take the lower trail which is flatter but again coming back i started to feel my knee ...


5

I think there have to be two parts to the answer: If you are in an immediately life-threatening situation where you have to act in order to survive, then the only thing that can save you when you are mentally shaken is training and routine. You can train dangerous situations in a safe environment so that when they occur for real, you know what you have to ...


5

It's next to impossible to answer your question in a classic "if this/then this" kind of format. There are so many variables and factors that would contribute to choosing what a priority is in any situation like this one. Many will try to "armchair" a situation like this, but really, it's better to have a "toolbox" full of useful skills and techniques that ...


5

A mostly non-medical answer. If you live in the United States (US) and you have health insurance. You can be relatively sure that the medical and legal communities both agree there there is very little risk of significant medical issues requiring more testing, then you are recieving. Google 'medical testing based on malpractice concerns' and you will ...


5

Doctors are not omniscient. They miss things. Some are sedentary, and they don't understand how important a full recovery is to an athletic person. Everyone, when going to a doc, needs to think through what to ask his doc, and know how to ask -- or insist -- effectively. We are not giving the OP medical advice here; we are suggesting how to manage his ...


4

Important disclaimer: I am not a medical doctor, all of the following is based on knowledge acquired from climbing courses and experience. Therefore I will keep it general, but take anything with a grain of salt (as you should with anything considering your health from unknown sources). Hangboarding and campusing are extremely dangerous to your fingers. As ...


4

Due to the nature of many injuries your awareness and ability to treat yourself may be impaired. Therefore, extra care should be taken. Don't do anything rash or hastily as that will probably just make things worse. Take a few moments to collect yourself and get an initial impression of how you feel. Your first concern is to prevent further injury and get ...


4

I suffered from chaffing for years and tried a whole range of options. What I found that worked best is the Under Armour Original Boxer Jocks, the 9" version. They cover most of the thigh and holds well enough to keep everything separated to avoid the chaffing. I get them from USA when they go on sale, but Wiggle, SportShoes and others stock them. If a ...


4

Yes, stop climbing. Your connective tissues are not ready for it. Active rest (easy climbing/easy training) and rehab/prehab for your fingers, wrists, forearms, and upper body in general will help. Look at it this way, however long you have had the injury/been feeling pain, you will need to rest and rehab your joints/connective tissue for the same amount of ...


4

Find yourself a good deep tissue massage therapist who specializes in things like carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, and thoracic outlet syndrome; someone who knows the muscles well enough to address these concerns will know the muscles well enough to massage the muscles of a climber. Just be prepared for to hurt a bit; just like every other muscle, the tiny ...


4

I have found that the best way to handle calluses ripping off is prevention. Once one rips off, it is often painful to climb on even if you tape it properly. If you do need to tape, wrap tightly with a narrow piece of tape around the finger and make sure the loose ends are on the back of your finger. For prevention, before climbing, check the skin on your ...


3

When walking uphill, your hips, knee and ankle flex, which reduces the effective stiffness of the articulated leg (i.e increases the 'springiness' of the gait). When going downhill, we tend to use both a more straight-legged gait with a more pronounced heelstrike, which increases the stiffness of the articulated leg (i.e reduces the 'springiness' of the ...


3

Change shoes. Visit a physiotherapist, and take your current shoes -- both the ones you use on trips, and the ones you wear every day. A good physio can learn a lot from reading the wear patterns on your shoes. If you go to a doc, go to a sports doc. Call the coach at your local high school or college and ask who's good. Part of the problem is sudden ...


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