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23

Talked to my doc today during a visit for something else. It's Iliotibial Band Syndrome. The band of connective tissue that runs along the outside of the knee becomes irritated and inflamed. It's often caused by over-pronation and poor gait which is exacerbated on the weight bearing leg (not the landing leg) when going downhill. Once injured, the only ...


21

This might sound a bit daft - but you could be holding on to the rock too tightly. Your other questions indicate you might be pretty new to climbing, and it is common for beginners to make this mistake. Primarily, you should be climbing with your legs - pushing your weight up. Legs are used to your weight - arms, and fingertips, are not. If you are steady ...


20

Oh friend, I have been down this miserable road just like you. I'll tell you what's at the end of it: swelling of the synovial fluid in the finger joints (which if not reduced leads to arthritis), bone spurs in the knuckles, and a year off the rock. Here's the good news, though: I'm happily climbing again and my fingers don't hurt! The finger joint pain ...


17

For wounds with heavy bleeding or that are deep, the standard practice is to: Apply direct pressure to the wound. Elevate the injury to decrease blood flow. In short, if the flow of blood is high enough that it won't clot then you want to impede the bleeding by whatever means possible. As mentioned elsewhere, tourniquets are a last resort, where the loss ...


16

The National Necrotizing Fasciitis Foundation says: Preventive Measures First, let it be said that there is no sure prevention. Necrotizing fasciitis has been known to be spontaneous. A bruise or abrasion are all the "opening" in the skin necessary for bacteria to enter. However, there are some things you can do decrease risk. The single ...


15

Self-assessment is difficult because your level of consciousness (LOC) may be impaired. Unfortunately, one's own state of mind is also very difficult to self-assess. I'll list here a brief overview of some of the "self-checks" you can do, but (as I'm sure you're already aware), getting a second person to check you out as soon as possible will help ensure you ...


14

Rather than try to answer the personal part of your question, which as Liam said needs a doctor's attention to answer properly, I shall reply to the more general title: Can a Finger Pulley injury be predicted / anticipated? In an absolute sense I do not believe it can be. In a relative sense it is caused high stress on these "pulleys" so avoiding hard use ...


12

Factors you can't easily control Some factors that you can't easily control play a clear role. These include genetics, being overweight,[Theisen] or having a previous injury. For example, people who want to lose weight may run in order to burn calories; they can't necessarily lose the weight before they start running so as to reduce their chance of getting ...


12

In addition to the suggestions above, regular use of walking or trekking poles are a great help in alleviating knee and hip problems.


11

I have suffered pretty badly from these on a couple long hikes. Here's my best suggestions from my experience: If at all possible stop hiking for a week (I know the scenario you set up precludes this ). Assuming for the rest of these you have to keep going: Whenever you stop, lie down with your feet up. If a cold stream is nearby, sticking your legs in ...


11

To quote from the Wilderness First Responder manual, Large objects found impaled in a wound should be left in place if you can get to a medical facility with relative ease. Yanking on an object can stimulate serious bleeding and damage underlying structures, especially if the object is impaled in a body cavity, such as the chest, abdomen or head ... ...


9

I have experienced the same when trail running. I can pretty consistently reproduce the symptoms on downhill stretches when running distances that are much longer than my regular runs, when starting to hit the trails again after not running for a while, and when running downhill at a faster pace than I would run uphill. The following is my hypothesis, ...


8

Not really. Not the answer you want, but your body is telling you something, you need to listen to it. It's a lot of fun, but you need to take it slow to ease your body into it. Otherwise the fun is going to come to an end. I've heard a lot of stories from people that buy things like these: http://shop.nicros.com/index.php/warrior-boardtm.html then go ...


8

"tight bandage/band" = Tourniquet. An emergency tourniquet is generally used as a last resort, especially in civilian applications, for all blood flow below the application of an emergency tourniquet is stopped, and can subsequently kill the tissue, leading to eventual loss of the limb below application. Never attempt to apply a tourniquet unless you are ...


8

Obviously, this is a scenario that could be avoided with proper planning and better practices. The best solutions would have been preemptive. Regardless, this scenario is where my question is to be asked from. (...) Assuming a normal load out (normal clothing, some water, a knife, etc.), what do you do to survive and make it back to a safe place? I'd ...


8

Rest? Sometimes this kind of pain can be a sign of overtraining. In the question, the poster doesn't say how frequently he climbs, or how long he's been climbing, so its hard to formulate an exact recommendation. If you're just feeling a tremendous amount of lower-grade soreness, try reducing the numbers of days a week you climb. I have friends that ...


8

If I had a 22lr and if it was legal, I would consider putting it out of its misery with that, otherwise you did the correct thing. When there is no practical way to save it, and you only risk injury to yourself then the correct thing is to keep yourself safe and stay beyond where it could hurt you and potentially give you rabies (even non-rabid dogs can ...


7

Holding on to crimpers is what causes pain in my finger-joints. This is from the Metolius website where they give instructions for hang-board training: "Avoid using crimp or cling grips. A very important aspect concerning any hold is how you hold on to it. It is extremely important that you do not use any kind of cling technique regularly." I have often ...


6

I've had this, too. You're just stressing different ligaments than when traveling uphill. I think it's a matter of getting the right exercise, which is to say, do the same thing on training hikes. I've also experienced pain in that area after crossing an ice-cold creek, then hiking after. Alleve is my drug of choice since I can take it at the beginning of ...


6

Orient yourself to the situation. Admit that you're injured and lost, but stay calm. Don't fool yourself into feeling invincible, but recognize that you are in fact strong enough to survive. If your current location and situation is a source of danger, immediately move to a safe location. It's better to be alive and lost than dead and not lost. Stabilize ...


6

Small addendum to the excellent answers already present: Never release a tourniquet unless you have received expert instruction on doing so. If the patient who received a tourniquet does not receive medical attention within a few hours, it is likely that the patient will loose the affected limb. Therefore, before applying a tourniquet, make sure that a ...


6

You are experiencing a strain of the LCL, the Lateral Collateral Ligament that connects your femur to your fibula with IT Band syndrome. The mechanics of going downhill when hiking are significantly different than up. When taking a step down from a height of more than 6 inches, the femur tends to stay perpendicular to the ground, under the hip joint while ...


6

Having suffered similar on a marathon I had to run in freezing rain once (ending up with not just large areas with the skin chafed off entirely, but also deep cuts into my thigh muscles from the stitching!) I can heartily recommend combining very supportive underwear with non-slip, stretch leggings. This way the only rubbing will be between the underwear ...


6

Water tight is subject to lots of variable. As you mention just staying out of the water is the least risk. There are Waterproof Transparent Dressings, a good example is Nexcare™ Tegaderm™ Waterproof Transparent Dressing It lists among its attributes "Seals out water, dirt and germs to help prevent infection" I have seen this stuff in use, it can stay in ...


6

Been there done that, I would just wrap a smaller width piece of climber's tape around the finger and then take extra care to smooth the end down as usually, that's where it starts to come unraveled. I would make sure to try and get most of the tape around the middle piece of your finger in between the joints as otherwise when you bend your finger it will ...


5

To the direct question, as indicated in other answers, tourniquets are placed towards the torso from the site of injury. There's been a major initiative in the US known as "Stop the Bleed." You'll find a significant number of authoritative trainings and recommendations, including the use of tourniquets. https://www.dhs.gov/stopthebleed. Other answers ...


5

I just got back from hiking Inyo county Bishop Ca. area call Sage flat and when coming down my outside knees began to hurt and by the time we got down it was hard to take steps. I hoped over night it would feel better so i could hike the next day, It did and we decided to take the lower trail which is flatter but again coming back i started to feel my knee ...


5

It's next to impossible to answer your question in a classic "if this/then this" kind of format. There are so many variables and factors that would contribute to choosing what a priority is in any situation like this one. Many will try to "armchair" a situation like this, but really, it's better to have a "toolbox" full of useful skills and techniques that ...


5

I think there have to be two parts to the answer: If you are in an immediately life-threatening situation where you have to act in order to survive, then the only thing that can save you when you are mentally shaken is training and routine. You can train dangerous situations in a safe environment so that when they occur for real, you know what you have to ...


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