17

That's essentially how 4 season tents work, the tent is full nylon (no mesh) and the fly is full and basically acts as a second tent, creating that air gap. some 4 season tents even have little foamies on them that help keep the gap, preventing snow from squishing the fly against the tent and eliminating that insulating volume: Putting a tent inside another ...


11

I used to work at Eastern Mountain Sports (a New-England, USA, based chain of outdoor goods). Granted, I haven't worked there in over 15 years, but I know what you are talking about. It was very popular early 2000's up to about 2010. Whether due to fashion or pricing (like Gabriel C. has suggested), I also don't see too many combo jackets any more. I'm ...


11

I don't know what your situation is exactly, but my advice would be to instead invest in a good down sleeping-bag. Or bring someone to cuddle with. A good sleeping bag will provide that pocket of still air you are looking for and is going to be much more compact and lightweight. For about a year and a half while at college I lived in a three-season two-...


8

Down is actually a pretty durable insulation, and if it is properly cared for will last much longer than any synthetic insulation. Some people use the same down sleeping bag for decades, but there are a lot of variables at play, and maintaining a down sleeping bag is a bit of an art form. When you buy a used down sleeping bag you will want to know: How was ...


7

Fill power doesn't measure crush resistance. It measures the inverse of density, in units of cubic centimeters per gram or cubic inches per ounce. Insulation doesn't depend on fill power. Insulation simply depends on thickness. However, a higher fill power allows you to achieve a greater thickness while carrying a given weight on your back. Fill power is ...


7

Tent in a tent will not really work. Firstly the chance of getting two tents that are designed to work this way is essentially nil. You will end up having to find two tents that are compatible - one larger than the other. The smaller tent must still be usable, and the larger one so large that it will not touch the smaller one anywhere. Secondly you'...


6

There's not a simple answer to the question of where your body loses heat, because the body is a sophisticated thermoregulator, and the amount of heat your body loses, and where it loses heat, varies depending on how warm or cold it "thinks" it is. The primary means of thermoregulation are by controlling blood flow near the surface of the skin, and by ...


5

Leaves under your tent will offer almost no value as you will crush them when you lay in your tent. The primary benefit from leaves comes from dead air space. However they will provide a more smooth and soft sleeping surface. Leaves piled around your tent will provide good insulation as long as they do not get wet. I could not find an R value, but I did ...


4

In my opinion two layers with say 60g/m² and 100g/m² are better than one with 160g/m². The different distribution of isolation is a point but I don't think this is relevant. You can get jackets with all kinds of stuffed torsos/arms/backs/arm-pits in lots thicknesses. The big advantage of the layering besides the versatility is the caught air between the ...


4

Yes, you can always add layers to stay warmer. Exactly how much warmer isn't really possible to figure out, as different jackets put their insulation in different places (e.g., more in the torso/arms/hood). Using multiple layers has the benefit that you can take off only some of your insulation if you are getting too warm (for example, if you start hiking ...


4

The primary advantage of higher fill power down is that it is warmer per ounce (or gram) than down of a lower fill power. If you had two nearly identical sleeping bags: same shell material, same weight of down, but one had 850 fill power down and the other had 700, the 850 fill power would be about 3˚F warmer. More insight into this and backing for my ...


4

When we get cold vasoconstriction occurs. This prevents the blood at the extremities being subject to heat conduction away from the body. This is not an adaption, this is a reaction. The body emits heat all the time because the body working and but wants to remain at constant temperature. If the ambient temperature is such that we can lose this heat, we ...


4

Among the problems with this idea is that pole ends from the inner tent can damage the floor of the outer tent. If you need to be warmer, augment your sleeping gear with an inexpensive blanket or two. Check around at used clothing stores or buy new.


3

200 liters of air weighs about 240 grams and heats up about as fast as 240 grams of sleeping bag, or 240 grams of yoga mat, I mean in a short time. It was reported that the air never heated up much though. Well that was because the air was moving around and dumping heat into the ground, as still air is one of the best insulators. If a bony person lays ...


3

As @Paul Lydon said, it is subjective because some people feel the cold more than others. Plus some people who are otherwise relatively unaffected by cold may, because of circulation problems, feel the cold in their hands more than others. The answer to the OP's question also depends on the length of time he will be outside, and the wind, and whether his ...


3

When I have to sleep in moist cold air I always put some newspapers under my matras. It absorbs the water thus keeping me much better dry and warm. If those leaves are dry when find them you can also put them under your matras with the same effect. I think it will work even better than putting them under the tent.


3

This is almost certainly close to the R-value for a "dead air" space the same thickness as the leaf layer and the less compressed the leaves are the higher the R-value. Setting up a test for this using a heat source and one or more thermometers shouldn't be too difficult.


3

The main problem with any ratings is that the insulation degrades pretty quickly, at least the synthetic one. Down holds its insulation properties longer, but it’s not perfect either. So the only reliable way to find out the quality of an older bag is spending a night in it.


2

The primary rating that should be on the bag is the pounds of insulation. It is a somewhat imperfect measure, but a summer bag might well be 2 or 2.5 pounds. A three-season might be 4, but that would not likely be enough for actual outdoor winter camping - but OK for a semi-heated cabin space. An older full-winter bag might be six pounds or more, with ...


2

Over most of your body your system can restrict blood flow to the skin, cooling the skin (and making you feel cold) Locations where bloodvessels run close to skin big sources of heat loss. Parts of your body that have sub-cutaneous fat lose heat more slowly. Wehre there is little fat (sides of the chest, under the arms) heat loss is more rapid. The ...


2

Lots of ways to reduce heat loss: Wear a hat scarf and gloves as these keep the most important parts of your body warm. Wear warm knickers (even if you're a guy). You can get fleecy knickers but not fleecy pants. Also, you can huddle, like penguins as it reduces your surface area and conserves bodyheat.


2

You would normally dress for the activity you're about to preform, and then add a watertight layer on top of your other layers. You also have to be certain that while the wet can't get to you from the outside, your poncho won't protect you against your on perspiration. As to address your direct question, you should insulate your head to protect against the ...


2

Well, both are synthetic fibre fill. They are likely to be very similar, but there isn't a lot of technical info on composition and performances for those materials. Even on the manufacturer's website, you can't find spec sheets for Primaloft. At Salomon, this is the most detailed info I could find, which says close to nothing. Outside from doing the ...


2

Makes a huge difference. I did it this weekend. The inner tent was very comfortable wearing long underwear, even outside the sleeping bag. The outer tent was cold and drafty. Outside was 30 degrees.


1

I had never heard of "cattail Down" but after a quick google, it sound like it is significantly heaver than duck or goose down. The R-value dose not measure a substances insulation value, rather the finished product [Ie. pink fiberglass insulation may be R12/R20 or R40 depending on the thickness and how it is manufactured]. Vary generally, you can think of ...


1

They are a hassle to use. On every trip I've been on, I've adjusted layers a dozen times a day. The last thing I want to do is to take apart my liner from my shell. It's much better to have separate layers. This also allows you to mix and match more, and when one wears out, it can easily be replaced. Example: I have a MEC expedition wind parka, and ...


1

Everybody feels the cold differently, but I swear by "buffs", which is easy to adjust into either a headband for keeping ears warm, a thin beanie to give a bit of head insulation, or even a makeshift balaclava. They are so light you won't even notice you are carrying it.


1

Down is fairly easy to measure in terms of loft when you lay out the old bags. Basically, if the feathers are so crushed that after a proper wash and fluff you don't have a bag that holds up the fabric a couple of inches above the floor - you'll know to try sleeping in it with a backup blanket or plan to test how warm it now sleeps. Presumably, you won't ...


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