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11

I used to work at Eastern Mountain Sports (a New-England, USA, based chain of outdoor goods). Granted, I haven't worked there in over 15 years, but I know what you are talking about. It was very popular early 2000's up to about 2010. Whether due to fashion or pricing (like Gabriel C. has suggested), I also don't see too many combo jackets any more. I'm ...


9

I'd like to challenge a premise of your question: I noticed that snow jackets tend to be cheaper than soft shell jackets and that they are waterproof and wind resistant, so I was wondering what issues I would face if I use a snow jacket? You are putting too much emphasis on labels: "Snow jacket" is an arbitrary label that a company (seller or producer) ...


8

It would probably work and some of it will just depend on your preferences. Possible issues may include, Too much insulation causing you to overheat and sweat and become uncomfortable, doubly so if the jacket is not breathable. Bulkier and heavier than it needs to be. Several layers instead of one large jacket works better for variable temps. Like I said a ...


8

I recently read an German article about merino wool which is well worth reading. I am just posting it here because I know you are German too @Paul. What you can expect by merino wool (and I think likewise in other kinds of wool) compared to the usual Softshells/Fleece made from synthetic fiber is: Durability: okay Breathability: very good (better) Water ...


8

While reading the answers to this question I had to disagree at some points. For example referring to @DavidR I don't think that Softshells are generally less windproof than Hardshells. Over the last years it seems that the manufacturers are mainly producing Softshell with Gore-Tex Windstopper membrane. I wouldn't say that those jackets are really that good, ...


8

A schoeller softshell would be best for breathability and wicking moisture. It doesn't seem to matter how much I sweat in my schoeller gear, it drys incredibly fast, but what you gain in breathability you often loose in weather protection. You may be interested in knowing that they do make backpacks that provide better ventilation for your back: Ventilated ...


7

There are jackets out there similar to what you're asking for---you do need to poke around for them a bit. Most jackets made for hiking and climbing tend to be cut from one material in order to have a more versatile piece. For a very use specific jacket, such pieces can be awesome though! Keywords that you'll want to look for are "body mapping" or "...


6

Snow jackets come in a lot of different variations. Insulation - from shell to full down insulation Water Resistance - From light to full Breath-ability - From light to full Note that waterproofness is not guaranteed in a snow jacket. They are predominantly designed to be worn in snow not rain and despite the fact they are both water, snow penetrates a ...


6

As for most outdoor activities, you can certainly get by with non-specialized clothing for skiing and snowboarding. As @imsodin points out in the comments, a ski resort is (compared to a lot of outdoor settings) a pretty safe place to make a mistake about clothing: if you find yourself too cold or wet, you can get indoors quickly; if you stay on-piste, your ...


6

Yes there is. First, without going into specific products I can say that I've ditched the idea of shell jackets. And by shell-jackets I'm talking about jackets made out of materials like Gore-Tex. No matter what the marketing department says, such a shell jacket will only get you wet from inside. Especially in rain when the material stops breathing ...


6

Given the description of the problem, it seems you have to replace the zip entirely. You can bring it to a tailor, they should be able to do most of it. They may not have the waterproof zipper, though, but you can find it online. Measure it first. It is probably a #5 size, though you don't have to use the exact same model. Or you can do it yourself if you ...


6

When wind is guaranteed but rain is unlikely you might decide the extra weight is worth it. But good layering with a hard shell that is breathable and has underarm zips can be quite comfortable while saving you the weight of the soft shell. This is my preferred option as the times I get too hot are generally when it's raining. Wind blocking fleece is an ...


6

When you think of the amount of wool we normally wear and use - and how it behaves - the only reason a wool garment would stink is that the wool hasn't been properly processed. This document is bit of an eye-opener. https://oecotextiles.wordpress.com/2009/08/11/what-does-organic-wool-mean/ On average, each ton of greasy wool contains: 150 KG ...


4

If you have a local outdoor shop, take it in to see what they recommend. If it needs repairing, they might be able to do it if they are licensed by TNF, or they might be able to send it in on your behalf. And don't assume it isn't under warranty. This could be a known problem, and TNF is, like most outdoor gear companies, good about standing behind its ...


4

Before getting into the main body of my answer, it should be noted that according to the company's guidelines a water-repellent product (DWR) should be reapplied "about every 5th washing cycle." Refreshing the Durable Water Repellency (DWR) The DWR of water-repellent products can be re-energized after washing by giving them a heat treatment. To ...


4

What you certainly need: Water proof - well that's a must as your top outer layer. Make sure to not simply get something water resistant (like some soft shells), but pick a jacket that offers some proper protection against rain. Breathable - for hikes or even only when walking/biking your your home town breathability is key. Otherwise you'll simply get wet ...


3

It looks like the answer is no, The biggest problem you face in dyeing a coat is that it probably has a DWR (Durable Water Repellent) finish. This is a coating that is applied to the outside of the fabric to resist water. It's very important to have a DWR finish on a down coat, because down loses all insulative ability once it gets wet. ... If ...


3

Down will inevitably pierce through thin fabrics (an thicker ones too, just less frequently). It's in the nature of quills to do so and even if very fine, there are quills nonetheless. The lighter the denier of the fabric or the looser it's woven, the easier the down will get through. Short of having a garment that is lined with something that slows this ...


2

I believe that I would try one or two inconspicuous spots where it appears to be wetting the exterior. Those spots may be resistant to your treatment for some reason. Try a spray waterproofing locally on those. The different formulation may penetrate better. If it doesn't work, you haven't ruined the jacket. You can always use the spray on boots or something....


2

Sew it back on and tape the seam. Stitching GoreTEX is the same as stitching any other material, the difference is you want to use Tenara thread, and you waterproof the seams on the inside of the garment after by ironing on GoreTEX seam tape. You can get any seamstress to repair your zipper, they'll probably tape your seam for you as well. If you want to ...


2

I have found that many drycleaning/laundry agencies (where you drop off your clothes and pick them up later, not laundromats) will do small repairs/alterations.


2

Well, both are synthetic fibre fill. They are likely to be very similar, but there isn't a lot of technical info on composition and performances for those materials. Even on the manufacturer's website, you can't find spec sheets for Primaloft. At Salomon, this is the most detailed info I could find, which says close to nothing. Outside from doing the ...


2

I recommend you try Gear Aid MiraZyme. It is formulated specifically to remove odors and it is safe for your waterproofing. It does not require you to wash your garmet harshly; instead you dip your garment in a dilute solution and leave it to air dry.


2

Sew a crotch strap: one end on the back, one on the front with quick release fittings, and length adjustable allowance.


2

Definitely make certain it’s lightweight and waterproof. Protecting your down jacket from wet weather is essential. Wet down will not keep you warm. Armpit vents make it breathable and are helpful keeping you cool when active. This is the Northface rain jacket I’ve had for 12 years. They still make it and it’s still available. This jacket is still in great ...


2

Question was edited to add the criteria of maximum 2 layers of something light. This invalidates the initial answers, but I am leaving this because I still think it is the proper solution to outdoor warmth. The real trick to staying warm is dressing in layers. If you put on enough layers, then you don't even need a jacket. The weather in my area is ...


2

Wind blocking is important in cold weather. A very small breeze on skin whisks away your warm air. On the flip side, keeping a thin layer of air stationary next to you works very well. I have an old sierra designs 3 layer gore-tex wind parka that over the years has lost its water repellancy. I still use it in winter, over a long sleeve polypro top. Your ...


1

In winter I will often wear a Paramo waterproof jacket (I live in the UK). If it is near to freezing or colder, then I also wear a light fleece top or jacket underneath. When stopped for any reason, I put on a Paramo Torres jacket over the top of the waterproof jacket. The Torres is a warm jacket marketed by Paramo just for this purpose (i.e. putting on ...


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