Hot answers tagged

57

It can be used for sure, but there are better options. A knife would require you to be very close to the dog, whilst a stick or pepper spray would provide much greater distance between you and the threat. Pepper spray is used by the US Postal Service, and they have lots of experience with dog bites. Of course, if you can avoid aggressive dogs in the first ...


49

Your primary objective when defending yourself against stray dogs is not to kill the dog, but to avoid getting bitten make the dog leave you alone If you fight a dog with a knife, even if you manage to kill it or make it run away, you will likely get a few bites and scratches. Having a stick or pepper spray is a much better option, as it gives you a range ...


42

It is a "reamer with sewing eye", according to Victorinox (PDF). It is used for punching holes in leather or canvas and can also used to get a thread through the hole, according to SAKWiki


41

Try to slice a piece of paper. A good sharp knife makes a clean cut. A dull knife makes either a ragged cut, or worse, just pushes the paper to the side. I like this article: https://www.fieldandstream.com/articles/hunting/2014/08/paper-cut-testing-blade-sharpness#page-4 and YouTube is full of videos of people showing off their knives via this test.


37

The tool has two purposes. As a punch, it acts as a large needle. You can use it to sew leather or canvas, as mentioned in the other answers. Punch the tool through your fabric, put thread through the hole, retract the tool, repeat. As a reamer, the non-uniform blade shape allows you to make quite good circular holes in plastic or wood. Punch the tool ...


36

The back of a fingernail can be a good rough indicator while you're sharpening - see if it "catches" when you apply very gentle pressure at ~45 degree angle. This can also be a good way to check if the edge still has any dull spots.


30

Knife is not a good idea. It does not give an understandable warning to an animal. When it comes to a warning, they more likely understand a stick-shaped thing. So for carrying, light telescopic baton is more suitable (or any other stick you can comfortably carry around). Remember, at the first place, you want to repel oncoming animal, not to harm it. Also, ...


27

A lot of factors go into choosing a backpacking knife, but I will break it down into four categories: weight cost survival utility your surroundings Weight There are a lot of high-quality knives out there in the 1-3 ounce range. The most experienced “ultra-lightweight backpacker” I know recommends the Spyderco Dragonfly ($50). With only a 2-inch blade ...


25

When mine gets too bad I use WD40 to free it up, then clean with soapy water and a brush. Mine also goes through the dishwasher sometimes, with the blades partially open. If it gets gummed up with sugary stuff (your candy, or cutting up fruit) a good soak in hot water will free up the blades. After cleaning it is a good time to sharpen it. If the hinges ...


24

Upsides It "looks cool" (to some) Cordage (but arguably useless as you have noted) Downsides Poor grip (compared to leather and manufactured alternatives) More likely to cause blisters Less durable, requires more maintenance PITA to clean if it gets messy/dirty/sweaty Once you unwrap the cord to use it, your knife has even worse grip. IMO - It's a ...


21

It's a line cutter, the idea is that you use it to cut lines, string etc. The reason that it's curved is to keep the line from slipping off the blade, using the rest of the blade would be quite difficult to do. See here for more examples. You wouldn't want to use it for skinning.


20

The best method in my opinion is one that must be learned, and involves moving your thumb across the blade, perpendicular to the blade not down it! It's very difficult to describe the feeling but if you do it on enough dull blades and sharp blades you will begin to be able to tell the difference. One other thing I will do if im sharpening a knife for a ...


18

You really want a saw or camp axe for this purpose, but if using a knife you want one without serrations. Serrations are not a replacement for a saw. A saw cuts a kerf wider than the blade itself so it (with skill) doesn't jam. Serrations are usually placed near the handle which is exactly where you don't want them because this is where you have the most ...


17

There's no simple answer to this question - everybody has their own preferences. (That being said, I'm a big fan of my straight edge SOG SEAL Pup Elite and would highly recommend it). There are a few simple guidelines, though. I'd suggest something with a (1) thick full-tang blade, so you could chop down some small trees if needed. But (2) not too big, so ...


16

My advice is to always use the entire length of the the stone, to make sure wearing is even, and it's easier to be slow and steady. Also, some good information on cooking.SE. How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a ...


16

A multi-tool or a knife? A multi-tool can be a very appropriate tool for backpacking. It combines the function of many of the tools you mentioned. You may carry the tools you mention above, though. (Note: I've NEVER needed a bottle opener...) If you mean a knife, read on... I do a lot of backpacking in the Eastern US, so I am going to assume that this ...


16

Slice a tomato with very little pressure. This is almost always when I notice a knife needs sharpening, and the difference is profound. Edit: I should have added ripe tomato; a sharp knife will slice it, whereas a dull one will smash it or rumple and tear its skin.


16

Generally I categorize sharpness into 3 levels: The tomato test - being able to slice through a tomato skin. Not use the pointy end to break the skin and then slice but directly slice the skin all the way through. This is sharp enough for cooking. The paper test - being able to slice thin phonebook paper or magazine paper or newsprint. For general carving ...


15

The type of oil surely matters. Within petroleum products, thick, waxy Cosmoline has proven to be effective, but it's not nice to remove. (I've never personally used it for this reason.) I have recently learned of and started using Fluid Film. It has an unusual (to me) wool-lanolin base. I have limited experience with it and I have not yet conducted my ...


15

Laws vary greatly by region, and are subject to being changed at any time. That being said, there are a few sites I used when looking up the knife laws in California. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knife_legislation Provides a good overview of knife laws, but did not provide the specifics I need. It's worth browsing the sources that they reference however. ...


15

The producer offers a page of care instructions on their website (here) (PDF). The gist is: don't use a dishwasher, that might be too aggressive open and close the blade multiple times in warm water dry thoroughly put some oil on the friction points (where the blades rotate), open and close multiple times @chris-h's answer is also spot on. I, too, use a ...


14

This is sort of an obvious answer, but if you're worried about a knife slipping out of (or cutting through) a cheap sheath, then get a knife with a better sheath. The traditional outdoors knife here in Finland is the puukko, usually worn in a leather sheath that grips the handle by friction, with an internal wooden last that protects the leather from ...


14

From personal experience with packs of stray dogs, especially coyotes, and also having some strange experience, carry a walking cane or staff (if you can). Dogs, while attacking as a pack, or thinking about attacking, try to do three things: Find easy prey Limit prey mobility Attack prey blind spots Keeping this is mind, stay moving to wherever it is you’...


13

While it can be useful if you are really out in the wilds, say in the Amazon jungle, and using a machete to clear every step, I wouldn't expect to carry a knife sharpener for a trip under a week. For short, non-jungle expeditions, A swiss army knife with a couple of blades is often enough for most people. To summarise - it can be necessary for longer ...


13

Ordinary vegetable oils of the type used for cooking will work but are not ideal. Over time they will gradually oxidise and may be colonised by bacteria, both of which can cause them to become acidic which can itself cause corrosion of the metal. Also vegetable oils can become gummy and sticky in quite a short period of time. Oils help to prevent ...


13

Canada does not really have any hard and fast rules, with regard to knives. Specifically, except for lists of a few specifically banned styles they do not even mention them. And something that must be kept at the top of your mind at all times is that a knife is not necessarily a weapon. There are specific lists and descriptions, but suffice it to say you ...


12

Serrations are formed on one side due to the method of manufacture (a formed grinding wheel). I suppose it would be possible to grind serrations from both sides with very careful alignment but I cannot recall seeing this on any production knives. Single-side or "chisel grind" blades are not restricted to serrated knives. Nearly all traditional Japanese ...


12

It can, yes - by keeping water and oxygen away it can greatly slow or prevent the oxidisation process from occurring. However, I wouldn't necessarily advise it as the best approach. Instead I'd advise making sure tools are clean and thoroughly dry, then storing them in a cool dry place (unless the manufacturer recommends otherwise of course.) There's two ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible