9

I checked the Ashley Book of Knots, and as #1044 I find your knot. A very compact loop tied with a bight, for use in the end only. It does not have a name in that book but may have been named by someone since the book was finished in 1939, or published in 1944. Or even before, as even as careful as Clifford W. Ashley was, he did miss some names. (As I ...


9

They are examples of a round turn and two half hitches. Sometimes known as an anchor hitch or a fisherman's hitch. http://www.animatedknots.com/roundturn/index.php?Categ=boating A Useful Boating Knot: A Round Turn and Two (or more) Half Hitches (ABOK # 1720, p 296) is useful for attaching a mooring line to a dock post or ring although probably less ...


6

I think you invented a new knot, or at least one that is decently documented (my non-trivial search came up empty). Regardless, the bigger question (as others pointed out in the comments) is how it handles in various tests, and whether it fares better, worse, or on par with the flat overhand bend. Even if it was previously named, it may not have been tested ...


6

Slip knot It's undoubtably a slip knot that's been tied off with a half hitch. some of the knots look different because some are tied off right-handed while others are left-handed. Compare the image below to the second image in the question: I think I even know why that knot was used in that display case too. Whoever made that display and tied the knot is ...


6

The knot in the photo you posted is a double overhand knot. It's often used as half of a double fisherman's bend, and that's essentially how it's being used in the web page. (It will become a double fisherman's bend once the loop of cord is weighted and the two knots collide.) The web page advocates using this as a harness to tie in someone who doesn't have ...


5

A hitch knot. A hitch is a type of knot used for binding rope to an object. You may be thinking of a clove hitch.


5

I would call it a basic munter hitch. Take the eye in the end of the cord (through which you are pushing the bight in the first image) and imagine it to be a carabiner. This should make the structure more obvious. A difference between this and a Purcell Prusik is that the prusik can slip when catching a fall, absorbing some energy that would otherwise be ...


4

This knot is what I'd call a stopper knot. You twist turn the end of the rope two times around itself, as shown, then thread the end through the now-created loops. It is used in rock climbing: If you attach the rope to your climbing harness with a re-threaded figure-of-eight knot, then with the short loose end you tie this knot around the long end. This ...


3

My brother happened to be over tonight using my climbing wall, he does rescue work, and he says they use this knot to tie leg loops for rescue harnesses. First of all, the knot in your picture isn't properly dressed, the loop pulls through the knot and ends up looking like this: It's a variation of a bowline on a bight. My brother's going to check his ...


3

I've shared this knot with a few members of the Alpine Climbing Club of Canada. The national representative for my section liked it a lot. I told him I was planning on naming it the 'abseil bend', and he disagreed. He's decided that it should be called the 'Shem-lock'. I was reluctant to accept that name, but he insisted. So... it's officially called the ...


2

Looking at the link provided by ShemSeger, I disagree that the knot in picture is actually the ABoK #1044. I am not particularly knot-savvy, but basically, following the one in picture here, it starts (say from the left), makes the small loop on the right, builds the larger loop in the middle and then turns around the standing end on the left before ...


2

Yep, when weighted the rope pulls through and reveals a false pair of loops. Definitely not a knot/loop that should be used!


2

I am fairly sure I have seen this documented by Mark Grommers of PACI. On this page http://www.paci.com.au/knots.php you can download the document 01_knots.pdf (password is given on the webpage). In v5.3b (16th Oct 2017), on page 37 and 38 there are two variations of the offset overhand bend for joining two rappelling ropes. The first takes one working ...


2

You may be referring to a bunny ears figure eight - it's an versatile knot used to construct rock climbing anchors. http://www.backcountry.com/explore/bunny-ears-the-best-multi-pitch-climbing-knot-youve-never-heard-of It has the benefit of having redundancy in the main loop (two loops in bunny ears compared to one in a typical figure eight). It's also ...


2

This knot appears to be one referred to as the tarbuck knot, named for its inventor, see for example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarbuck_knot or http://www.craigmarine.info/accessories/fishing_equipment/Tarbuck-climberKnot.htm It is intended to be able to absorb sudden loads, which is useful for climbing, especially in stranded, synthetic type ropes. (...


1

Since asking the question, I've done some experimentation and discovered a potentially serious problem with this knot. When it is tied from cord, the size of the loop around which the munter is tied (thanks to @requiem for pointing out that it is a munter) is critical. If the loop is too large, it can twist into a configuration where the rope can simply ...


1

It's the same shape as Ashley's "Knotted Strap Hitch", #1696 page 294. That hitch is intended to be tied with both loops around the hitched object and with both ends loaded, not as a two-loop loop knot with a running end and a standing end. As a loop knot, it wouldn't be named a "hitch" even if it were of any use in any real-world application, but, this is ...


1

This knot is actually what our trip guides use to set up our high ropes course, each loop goes to a carabiner on their full body harness (which is a great way for both loops to be equalized) and they climb up the course with this knot. I'm not sure why you're saying it's not to be used, but our research and years of using this knot have been conducive to a ...


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