Hot answers tagged

33

I use a truckers hitch it is easy to make and create and pull tight. It is not difficult to untie but does stay in place well. It is a great knot when you need to cinch something down. Image source https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:TruckersHitchUsingAlpineButterfly2.jpg


25

The bowline knot is very safe if loaded correctly. This is the usual, safe way to load it: The chair foot is the body (sorry for not offering naked models), the part of the rope leading away from the picture will take the load. In this use case the knot should hold perfectly. On the other hand, you might get the idea to use the bowline knot to create a ...


23

The absolute strongest? That would be an eye splice. It's the most effective and strongest form of making an eye in a rope and it's what the thimbles are designed to work with. It's nigh on permanent, but that's the trade for strength. All mere knots are a trade off between strength and "untieability", if you're never intending to untie the knot you never ...


21

I agree that the trucker's hitch will certainly do the job. That said, if your special situation requires retightening if things start to sag, you might consider the tautline hitch. It's a great knot for situations where you might need to take up slack due to stuff like rope stretch in the dark and rain (like, say, if you're using your line to make an A-...


19

In a 3:1 (Z-pulley) haul, the victim's rope is used for hauling directly. As you point out correctly, a surface rescue is impossible if you have knots in the rope, since the rope is under tension and you cannot untie the knots. However, you can also drop a different strand of rope down to the victim and haul them out with that (it's then called a rescue ...


18

The easiest way is to tie a fixed loop in the middle of the rope (figure 8, alpine butterfly, bowline on a bight, etc) and then clip the climber in to that loop using two locking carabiners. Two carabiners are used here in order to avoid the scenario of a single carabiner rotating into a cross-loaded orientation during a fall and failing as a result. ...


15

A Sheet Bend is designed for joining two lines of different size. If you need additional security use the Double Sheet Bend http://www.animatedknots.com/sheetbend/


15

Figure eight-knots are not directional. Once the knot is properly tied and dressed, it doesn't matter if you passed the rope through from the top or the bottom, it is purely a matter of preference. Things to watch out for when tying your figure-eight: Does the rope go through both tie-in points, and not through the belay loop? (like you mentioned in your ...


15

In the context of rock climbing, compared to a figure-8 knot, bowlines are: About as strong under ideal circumstances BUT: Can come untied on their own when unloaded Are more difficult to visually inspect (important, because climbers frequently rely on partners to check their knots, and may be tying and untying knots when they're tired and / or distracted)...


15

A knot that's simple and easy to use, explicitly for the purpose of tying in to the middle of the rope, would be the Alpine Butterfly. Tie it, then put it to your belay loop with one or two locking carabiners.


14

I believe the conventional way is to use a double (triple) fisherman's bend. This has the advantage of being and relatively compact. The main disadvantage is that it can be hard to undo if you need to. Other options include the figure of 8 bend which is bulkier than the fisherman's but easier to untie. You could also use a (double) sheet bend or even a ...


14

Yes, regardless of how as you dress it, that is still a figure 8 knot. It's not going to matter either, because once the knot is weighted, it will be pulled into the same configuration regardless of the angle the loop is dressed to. In other words, the top picture will look like the bottom once force is applied.


13

As Freedom of the Hills also states: "Mechanical ascenders are stronger, safer, faster, and less tiring." – Freedom of the Hills The key advantage in there being, "less tiring", yes you could save a couple hundred grams by not carrying ascenders and instead using some prusiks, but how much do those weight savings benefit you after you've ascended a ...


13

As others have commented, Trucker's Hitch (with an Alpine butterfly) would be the best. Note that it would be enough to do it on one side only; I usually tie an Anchor Hitch at the other side. Another option, when you won't be loading the rope too much, would be to use an Adjustable Midshipman's Hitch. As a bonus, you could easily re-tighten the rope by ...


13

At one end, I tie the rope any old how. It can be loose even. Then I go to the other tree and pull as hard as I can on the rope until it's really tight. Then, holding tight, I walk around the tree several times until the turns of the rope round the trunk are doing most of the work of holding it tight. Then I can tie it off. If things slipped a little while I ...


12

In addition to zoul's excellent answer, the Bowline has another drawback in that it can come loose (or even undone) after repeated load/unload cycles (i.e. weighing and unweighing the rope). This means that the bowline is not as good as the figure-8 to use to tie-in a climber, especially for multi-pitch climbing, gym climbing, etc... (That said, many good ...


12

The three knots you listed are all quite suitable for tying in to a sit harness for rock climbing. The figure eight is the most widely used and most readily and easily inspected, and is not a bad choice for tying in: ...When tying into the rope there’s a reason the figure eight knot has been the knot of choice for years. Strong, simple, easy to untie and ...


12

As already stated, these are very similar knots regarding their use. So there is not much that differentiates them from each other, or to other friction hitches. The advantage of the prusik is the "clean" design: All strands are neatly position parallel to themselves, so it is easily inspected for correctness. For the Klemheist this is not the main criterion;...


12

The main reasons is simplicity and habituation: A prusik made from a loop is easily taught and controlled. This is a point that many experienced climber forget about often: When people start they may struggle on the basic knots. So for the first thing to learn a simplicity is more important than functionality. And the prusik is a long established and ...


12

To answer your question as to the ideal break position when using the munter: It depends. It depends on your comfort and experience with the knot, its application and the situation. I have rappeled and belayed with munter-hitches on numeral occasions. A double stranded munter-hitch rappel provides a significant amount of friction and unless you want to ...


12

3 to 7mm utility cord. It is designed to be tied. If you go to a climbing retailer you can typically buy by the foot.


12

A double fishermans can be adjusted for length by pulling on each knot and sliding them along the strand. You can also adjust the tail lengths and increase the number of turns to improve the appearance and use up extra slack.


12

Although you asked an outdoors question, I'm going to give you a physics answer that might shed some light (with an outdoors note at the end.) When you string an ideal rope (with zero stretch) horizontally between two ideal vertical trees (with zero give), and then hang an object from the center, the horizontal force pulling on the two trees is... infinitely ...


12

P.S.: I just noticed the question explicitly said indoors! My answer ended up being considerably more general than required... But well, the logic is the same as in case (a): Indoors the bolts are really close, so you should climb (or downclimb) to the nearest one and attach yourself to the fixed quickdraw using the harness belay loop. Both options you ...


11

The Ashley Book of Knots (published 1944) references the outside bowline as "inferior" but just says weakness nothing specific. In America the "outside" bowline is often called the "Dutch" bowline or Cowboy Bowline. So since, you ask, why is the bowline on Outdoor Stack Exchange tied with the end on the inside? because that is the classic bowline. End on the ...


11

It's what @imsodin said. Bloqueur is the french term for "blocker" in English. So when I talk about a bloqueur, I'm talking about blocking devices. The two that I use for ascending a rope are the Petzl basic and Petzl croll. The use of French terms is a habit that I picked up from canyoning, which is by origin a French sport, so most of the terms used there ...


11

This is a great, and well thought out question! I'll try best as I can to answer as somebody that both climbs, guides, and teaches, but I worry that a correct answer doesn't exist, and at best it'll be an informed answer based on what we currently know. I'll elaborate below.. Question: If the rope or accessory cord that you are using will hold a single ...


11

The most common use of a bowline on the bight in climbing these days is to make a loop in the middle of the rope in a party of 3 or 4, as one of the comments above mentioned. In this case there's no inside or outside, and the knot is symmetrical with respect to the two ends. As a tie-in knot, while I can see the difference between an inside and outside ...


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