23

I'm going with "it's too dangerous, so don't do it". I have two manufactured alcohol stoves, and both contain warnings against refill while hot. That being said, my answer is "You don't". Pictured (I can't see the video) suggests a squeeze bottle with a plastic tube running into a reservoir where the alcohol is supposed to be while flames are clearly ...


17

You don't, adding liquid fuel to stove with a live flame is never recommended. Related meta post Do we want a post notice for questions where people are using equipment in ways that are clearly incorrect or dangerous? Believing the stove to be out of fuel, she tried to pour more denatured alcohol into it from a large container that exploded, shooting ...


14

Below a list of common camping fuels and their translated names. Please do leave a comment and/or edit this answer if you think there are errors or if you can fill the gaps or provide more information. Note that some of the listed substances are not frequently used as fuel, but I think listing them can be useful to avoid misunderstandings. White Gas (US ...


12

While writing the question, I've figured out an answer. I just burn the fuel in the stove. Maybe this little knowledge would be helpful.


12

There are a couple of reasons why you can't use alcohol or acetone: A petrol/gasoline/kerosene/diesel etc. stove needs the fuel to be vapourised, under pressure and mixed with air for it to burn (cleanly/efficiently). Alcohol doesn't. You can burn it cleanly in an open cup, though designs with a ring of jets work well; these are different to the jet plus ...


10

I was recently in Mexico and bought some unleaded gas at a gas station as stove fuel. I gave the unused fuel away to a taxi driver to put in his car. I suspect the same thing would work fine with the fuels sold as "white gas" or "camp fuel." I've heard conflicting information about exactly how this stuff is formulated, and for all I know it depends on the ...


9

There are four common types of stove alcohol: methanol, ethanol, denatured alcohol, and isopropanol. You can usually find them in hardware stores and (but not always) in camping stores. You can also get it as gas line antifreeze in automotive stores but be careful to read the label because antifreeze also comes in several other forms. Methanol Methanol is ...


8

In my experience, the biggest culprits for leaking fuel are bad o-rings, but replacement o-rings of the wrong size and loose caps have also played a part. Over-tightened caps can also be a problem especially if the o-rings are a bit off size. Another consideration is the amount of fuel spilled on the stove or canister during fueling and use. Especially if ...


8

Not all fuels mix well. However, in the case of white gas and unleaded gasoline, one is basically a (much) cleaner version of the other, so you're not mixing so much as diluting the white gas with its inferior (for cooking) sibling. Still, you would get better performance out of the remaining white gas if you don't mix it with the unleaded. There's really ...


8

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


8

Alcohol can (and does) eat certain types of seals. Do not use alcohol to clean the stove unless you are certain it is safe for alcohol fuel. Similarly, carb cleaner is extremely corrosive and will eat many different types of seals/gaskets. First thing to try is to disassemble and scrub with baking soda, dish soap, and a toothbrush. If that does not ...


8

Here are a few methods If you have a lawnmower or weed eater you can dilute your gas by about 5% to 10% with it and burn it off that way, even if the fuel is 'bad'. Additionally, many fire departments will accept all manner of fuel, good or bad, and use it for backburning areas preparing for the summer fire season. Some auto parts stores will accept fuel ...


7

This question honestly could be too localized on these specific products. However, considering the ubiquity of these stoves I find it is probably quite useful information to know if they could have interchangeable parts. MSR's Whisperlite International & Universal stoves are very similar products, but they have some fairly notable differences. Let's call ...


7

I believe the threads are generally compatible, BUT that's not the issue. Trangia bottles are not metal (they're a plastic like material, perhaps floridated HDPE). Trangia bottles are NOT built to handle pressure and could be very dangerous if used with a pressurized white gas stove (such as a Whisperlite, Nova, Omnifuel, Dragonfly, etc). On the other hand ...


7

This is dangerous And the most dangerous thing about it - is that it gives the appearance of not being dangerous. Don't refill a lit alcohol stove without being aware that it could become a fireball that will consume your facial hair, your tent, your skin, your travel mates and/or your/their visual acuity for perhaps life. Sure. It might work once. Or ...


6

When packing/carrying the stove there are two main aims: to not break it and not get the rest of your kit covered in fuel. There are some tips for achieving this: pack the stove somewhere secure where it won't get too knocked about/crushed/bent. Most stoves will pack inside a pot/pan which is my preferred way of doing this. Similarly for the fuel bottle ...


6

Most things I can think of would stop it working even when full. My one suggestion is, is the pump below the fuel line when on its side? The fuel line is the white tube in the picture. If it is in the middle of the bottle and the fuel is low it might not be submerged when the bottle is horizontal. Have you tried putting the bottle vertically or rotating it?...


5

I have successfully used mixtures of gasoline, diesel and kerosine in various portions and had no problems that couldn't be solved by swapping to the other jet. Use the suck it and see approach works fine without getting technical. If availability is an issue and it comes to hot dinner or raw dinner are you really going to be that picky which fuel you use, ...


5

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


5

In general 'lighter' fuels with less additives will mean that the stove needs less cleaning. Most of the reason I've needed to clean a stove is from additives which don't burn properly (particularly when igniting the stove) can can block the nozzle and things. For this reason compressed gas (not gasoline) is probably best, followed by Coleman fuel (white ...


5

No alcohol - because these use a vapour phase to burn, this is best achieved by evaporation from the surface of the fuel under the heat generated by burning. Pressurizing alcohol based fuels results in a flame-thrower is my understanding. It depends on the jet you have - larger jets for fuels with low vapour pressure generally. Kerosene is heavy-chain ...


4

One other issue is altitude changes. Even with 'new' gas bottles going from 0 to 10000 feet (or back down) may cause problems. One way I've dealt with this is to put the gas bottle in a zip lock bag (the larger bag sizes sometimes have two "zippers"). Eric


4

You should define whether you are asking about white gas stoves or isobutain (canister) stoves. For most backpackers, your main decision will be between the 2 broad stove categories: canister fuel vs. liquid fuel. You may also want to consider one of the growing number of alternative-fuel options now available.. A good resource to get started if you ...


4

If you are not specifically looking for a liquid fuel thing: I always fantasized about making one such thing. But I have never tried. Get a tin Make something that looks like below. Advantages: Tins are easy to find and so are those solid fuel tablets If you break it, worst case you will be at loss of money worth a burger and time worth an afternoon nap.


4

Martin's answer is good. Adding a few tidbits: Most alcohol stoves will burn other alcohols. Denatured alcohol usually refers to ethanol with an agent added that makes it undrinkable. The 3 carbon alcohols (propanols) also burn well. Iso-propanol is often marketed as rubbing alcohol. Read the label: Often comes as 70%, 90% and 99% alcohol. Higher ...


4

In the UK many petrol stations (which, BTW have some of the longest opening hours of any retailers, especially on Sundays) say minimum 2 litres, some minimum 5. There are rules about the type of container you can fill; the one your bottle might not meet is simply labeling. Years ago it wasn't unknown to fill a 1 litre bottle and pay for 2 litres, but on ...


3

What's the problem? The guy at the airport will take it from you. Proper legal disposal is now his business. There might be a kiosk for dropping items you forgot to leave at home, before dealing with people.


3

My personal preference is for gasoline (yes, even ethanol added). I've never had to clean any of my stoves since I started using it. Given that the quality is pretty closely monitored and regulated in the US this is an extremely consistent, clean burning, and cheap option. It's also extremely easy to find... It should be noted that the "white gas" available ...


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