24

It's possible that it could damage the soft gear, Tests done by the UIAA Safety Commission and some rope manufacturers have shown that marking ropes with liquids such as those provided by felt-tipped pens can damage them; even with those markers, sold specifically for marking ropes. The test results have shown a decrease of up to 50% of the rope ...


5

Some manufacturers state that soft goods such as ropes and dogbones can be damaged by markers so it is best practice not to mark them with sharpies or other generic markers. If you do wish to mark them, there are special markers designed for the purpose. For example, see this one by Beal.


4

It looks like the answer is to clean them out at least once a year, once the breeding season is over and before winter, which would be around the end of August in the northern hemisphere (or the end of February in the southern hemisphere). If a species has multiple broods, they can be cleaned out between each one, so long as you wait until after the birds ...


1

I have had this problem with several packs. One solution that has worked for me is to spray the insides with VALSPAR Premium Finish-Satin (in a very well ventilated area).


1

In addition to @manoftheson answer, I would recommend to have a look at Annex J of IRATA International Code of Practice (ICOP) (title: Resistance to chemicals and other properties of some of the man-made fibres used in the manufacture of rope access equipment). Il lists various chemicals, and gives their effects on various fibre types (Polyamide is the fibre ...


1

A concise summary of no-nos for nylon rope and webbing: Strong acids and alkalis, particularly battery acid and muriatic acids, and chlorine bleach. Black Diamond replicated a harness failure where the critical stitching pulled apart under finger tension after immersion in weak battery acid. Prolonged UV exposure (we're looking at practical climbing usage ...


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