13

This looks like decommissioned harbor mines. At the end of World War II many were removed from river mouths & harbors. Once set out you can not use them again, so they removed the explosive & primer, then dumped the rest close to the place where it had been decommissioned. They were deactivated, then thrown on the beach. This one is too rusty to ...


12

There were two large steel water tanks on these foundations back in the 1960's. The tanks were rectangular. I used to play in these woods as a child and remember the tanks as being very rusty and military looking.


11

They appear to be part of a water tank. I've found a 1954 OS map that describes buildings at that location as "tanks" -- a term also applied on the same map to the water tower itself. Earlier maps don't show them The current OS map only shows the tower itself. Without a scale so making very rough guesses as to the diameter of the silver birch trees, they'...


10

That is half of an old summit registry box. That one is missing the top and might not be the exact style but the full ones look like this. Source You can see more pictures of them here and a history of the summit registers in the Sierra's here. Its obvious that its aluminum because it hasn't corroded and the point of the "rollers" is to keep the record ...


9

Yes, that looks like arrow heads I've found in that general area too. Note that it may be a unfinished or discarded piece. There is clear flaking and shaping. It would be very very unlikely for this to have happened by natural causes.


9

A quick note that if you ever hike in areas where you might wander into any place that may have been a bombing range, please familiarize yourself with the concept of unexploded ordinance: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unexploded_ordnance That’s probably a battery. Some have a metal post and shell that might outlast other components after a few years / ...


9

Looks very similar to a bird nesting facility I've seen before in nature reserves. Purpose: allow for safe nesting for (probably a specific, possible endangered, species of) birds. Safe, because it is not attached to the land so some predators won't be able to reach it. Not sure if there is an official name for it. Also I've seen similar looking devices ...


8

Just thought to expand the topic a little more. What is pictured in Sue's question is floating nest for birds. There are a number of birds that prefer the safety of raising their young away from the shore because of predators. Ideally they are not attached to land and are anchored in order to keep it that way. Although floating nest platforms are accessible ...


8

Yes these could very well be for horses, especially if they are all between 2 foot and 3 foot high (feet and inches are the usual terms for all horse jumps). They could be cross country obstacles for eventing. Eventing is the term for either dressage, show jumping, or cross country, or more usually all three in combination (also known as horse trials). ...


8

I'm pretty sure it's some kind of a suet cake/fat ball, i.e. bird's food, see the first image on the Wikipedia article: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suet_cake (Luc Viatour / https://Lucnix.be)


6

Possibilities: Some form of remote sensor, Perhaps they wanted to monitor microclimate values of temp and humidity on a long term basis. Bug trap. The container fastens with wingnuts, while the bracket appears to be screwed or nailed. By implication the container was intended to be replaced/inspected multiple times. Bug trap would fit this, as would ...


5

These are "Boom Piers" they are man made island used to divide the river for multiple paper company's use of the river to transport logs. They extend about 8 miles “The way to get their product here was to put the wood in the water and float it down,” explains Paul ‘Poof’ Tardiff, a historian and columnist for the Berlin Daily Sun. All that wood, ...


4

I think the answer by mmcc is mostly correct. They are probably parts of an old electrical device battery. But the round case is not steel. Steel (ferrous metals) rust (oxidize) like the narrow strap with a rusty brown color. Non-ferrous metals oxidize in different ways. The green inside is a typical oxidation color of copper. The canister is some type ...


3

It does not appear to me to be naturally shaped; it looks like human hands fashioned it. I don't see any sign of notches for affixing to a staff so I agree not a spearhead, but it does look like what I've heard were used as skinning knives, to help separate skin from game.


2

I agree with @Jimmy Fix-it, it doesn't appear to be naturally shaped. I am certainly no expert on stone tools and it is a little hard to see from your images, but it looks a little like it has been knapped for shape and and looks like it has been pecked along the edges at least partially. It may be that it is an unfinished tool as it appears only partially ...


2

Without having more info on the specific parameters of the study, it's hard to know exactly what they were looking for. Either water or snowpack characterization might be very likely subjects. I'm wondering if they used black pebbles specifically because they are black, which would suggest their ability to gain heat is important. Or maybe it's not relevant ...


1

I don't honestly know what an arrowhead looks like, especially not well enough to make a definitive identification. However, I found two references that at least confirm a possibility that arrowheads may exist on the Toiyabe Crest Trail. Since you asked "could it be an arrowhead," I hope this might be helpful. There aren't any pictures in either of them, so ...


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