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22

But does that mean it's a decent dirt road that an ordinary car can handle, or is high clearance and/or 4x4 need? How would I go about finding out? You ask locals. It's the only way. No map will tell you how frequently a road is maintained. Even maps that tell you whether you need 4WD or 2WD, as some road maps do, can at best tell you to what level it is ...


11

The easiest way is to just drive it. You need a "certain tolerance" for minor wear and tear and bumps to your car and some cars are better suited than others, but with a bit of patience and by taking your time you can pass by a lot of roads with a 2WD. For example I have a stick shift Civic, I'm quite happy going on lots of really bad roads here ...


7

Has the road been mapped by Street-view? If not does Street-view go along an intersecting road? If so you might be able to get some pictures of the start or all of the road respectively. You can also look for commentary about the trail online or find local (to the area of the trail) hiking groups and/or 4WD groups that might have better knowledge. In my ...


6

Mosquitoes require water, so look for proximity to swamps, lakes or slow rivers. Elevation contours would also help, you are less likely to end up in a boggy area if it's on a slope. I am not sure what else you can deduce from a map here, mostly I'd look for trail reviews/ask on forums for a particular location during a specific season. Good idea to ...


5

Ordnance survey were asked on twitter, and replied that: "Hi thankyou for bringing this to our attention. The circles are actually blemishes on the data which are being removed and will no longer show in future updates. Sorry if this has caused any inconvenience." Of course they might say that if it were a fictitious entry as suggested by Darren's ...


4

I'm not sure what app you're using, but they're from the app, and not part of the base map. You can view the OS map in Bing (yes, it is useful for something!) here and the circles (octagons?) don't appear. What made me think they're not on the base map though is the line weight. The screenshot embedded kin the question has been through a bit of rescaling, ...


3

Nothing appears there on the satellite view, although the tree cover could well be concealing whatever it is. My best guess at the moment is that this is a fictitious entry that is added by cartographers to catch out copyright violators who blatantly rip off their work. These fake entries also go by the names “Mountweazel”, “Trap Street”, and others ...


3

Your best bet is to find a local topographic map. Google maps cannot even provide the right house numbers in my area, let alone topographic feature reliability. Depending upon where you live, there should be a govt agency that will publish topographic maps that should show in more detail what the local landscape is. More information on topographic maps here: ...


3

As far as I know there is no way on google maps or open street maps to determine what the soil type is in any particular area, you would need a geologic map (e.g. this one)for that, and even then it is only going to give you a suggestion as to what it is as geologic maps are usually concerned with rock types, though they can also cover sedimentary deposits ...


3

In OpenStreetMap many roads have the key "surface". Its value should give a good idea of the road conditions.


2

You are supposed to be able to load custom points of interest onto Garmins from a PC. Here is a full set of instructions, though they may be rather dated. Rather simpler is loading waypoints. On my old Extrex the name was limited to very few characters, but that was partly because of the very simple screen. Many applications of GPS technology are now ...


2

Such a program certainly could be designed, but there would be liability problems for whoever produced and distributed such a program. It would give users the impression that they have permission to use properties to play squash, while the property owners had not granted that permission. Probably the best way is to use google or bing maps to find likely ...


1

I have a Garmin Oregon, and while it is possible to load gpx files with custom points of interest using the Garmin Basecamp software (https://www.garmin.com/en-US/software/basecamp/), there are a couple of restrictions that make it less than optimal. the software seems a bit outdated sometimes it just doesn't work, but you don't get any good error messages ...


1

Short answer: yes, and I do this with my Inreach Explorer+. Garmin supports GPX files, among other file types. I have a monthly charge because I wanted the messaging/SOS functionality. It seems you can do similar with a 65S and Base Camp and no montly charge. And yes Garmin software is clunky. I have learned to mutter and shake my head.


1

Garmin offers a "BirdsEye" product which is satellite image files that can be loaded directly onto a handheld GPS receiver. Use your BirdsEye Satellite Imagery subscription with BaseCamp™ to quickly transfer an unlimited amount of satellite images to your device, with frequent updates, and seamlessly integrate those images into your handheld’s ...


1

Remember, any vehicle is an off-road vehicle if you don't care about it. All kidding aside, OnX Offroad is a great app you can download that usually has trail conditions, accessibility, and closure info for a surprising number of trails and roads. Ranger stations are also a great resource, just pop in and ask, they're usually very friendly.


1

The closest match with the 1:25000 OS map symbols that I can see is #16 scree. The circles are not shown on the 1:50000 map and there is no scree symbol for that map range either. The circles are all the same size: perhaps there are just a few small distinct patches of scree.


1

I had a look through the symbols/legend for the ordnance survey maps here (PDF), and could find nothing that matches exactly the type of symbol you have shown. The closest were boulders (under Heights and Other Natural Features), but these would be normally oval/irregular shapes rather than circles, and with a heavier weighting on the line. The other ...


1

Gaia GPS and Trailforks both have gpx support and free offline maps. [trailforkes is great if your hiking areas are near biking trails]. Avenza is great as well, but takes more setting up. If you want to make custom maps and layers this is your app.


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