25

I disagree greatly with all previous answers. Pushing the hook the rest of the way through is very painful and takes much longer than the method I describe below. My preferred method is to wrap some strong wire around the bend of the hook, press down on the eye to disengage the barb and pull on the wire very firmly. The hook will pop right out and not ...


23

Often the best solution is to get some fine nosed pliers and push the point of the hook out and through, making an 'exit wound'. This is often preferable to trying to pull a barbed hook back the way it went in. Obviously some common sense needs to be employed here... I'm really talking about a small hook caught in a fold of skin. Of course if you are in ...


20

I'd suggest being very careful with information about venomous snakes on the internet. The reason is the USA's traditional preponderance on that medium (particularly the English-speaking portion of it). The USA is somewhat unusual in that almost all venomous snakes one is likely to encounter are Pit Vipers. These snakes have a special muscle for pumping ...


18

There is hardly anything very effective first aid as such, considering the fact that you are 5 hrs walk from any medical facility. I guess I can assume that you will be roaming in rain forests of Agumbe or anywhere in Southern Western Ghats since you referred to King Cobras. If in India, you would definitely like to take a look at The Big Four. ...


12

The first question you need to ask yourself is, do I absolutely need to move this patient. If somebody is too injured to walk out themselves, you want to avoid moving them without proper equipment if at all possible. If there's any chance of a properly equipped rescue team arriving in the same amount of time (or even more time than) it would take you to get ...


12

Assuming you have no way of safely and reliably leaving the cave to get help, your first priority is not to become a casualty yourself as well. Even if the Guide needs urgent medical attention, it would take an appreciable amount of time for the first members of the cave rescue team to arrive on site and then to locate you and the Guide in the cave, so ...


12

The usual place this happens is a finger, ear, occasional other places. If you are close to town, and have good insurance by all means, tape it in place to minimize movement, and go see a doctor. I'm assuming that, given the forum, medical help is not at hand. Clip the line off the hook. You don't need to make things worse, when someone trips on the rod,...


9

I have seen a doctor perform the removal of a hook embedded in the skin. As most have pointed out, the first best thing is medical attention I won't dare argue against that sound advice. But, one thing I will say is DO NOT PUSH THE HOOK IN FARTHER, DO NOT CUT THAT HOOK, DO NOT CUT THE LINE. Now, envision this; as long as the hook is NOT embedded in a serious ...


6

I can't say I have any experience on these specific products, but I do have quite a bit of experience of diarrhea in an environment where you need to manage it yourself. I was fortunate enough to travel with some very knowledgeable people in that respect - they are studied pharmacists with lots of experience. Where it mattered, they had all the tools and ...


6

First of all you need to control what is life threatening. Control the bleed. Lay them down and elevate the wound if necessary. Apply sterile dressings (or the closest thing you have to sterile). As it continues to bleed apply more dressings. Blood goes through a clotting process and if you pull the dressings it has to start over. Then assess the ...


6

A good wilderness first-aid reference is included below to give you a better grasp on how to handle different wounds. Here's some key points for a wound like a knife wound you described. Note that the best first-aid will depend on the details of the wound, the wounded, and what conditions are present for treatment (who's around, how far is advanced help, ...


6

You are going to need some sort of sticks. If you're canoeing, you have paddles. (It would be great if you had 4 - lash them together blade to blade and get longer stretcher handles. With only two I hope your passenger can sit up or curl their legs up to fit on a shorter stretcher.) Any other activity, you're going to need to attack some trees - get poles as ...


4

I am not familiar with the reptiles around the world. I can however, share the results of my (informal) research (read: googling) of several years ago. I did that, because I was going alone in the summer forest several hours from help at any time. I discovered a viper incident report, among the many forum statements that snakes in Bulgaria are not deadly. ...


3

According to this article: How to identify and treat snake bites - yes this does seem to be something which some people state as accurate. Venomous snakes have two fangs that deliver venom when they bite. A venomous snake bite will usually leave two clear puncture marks. In contrast, a nonvenomous bite tends to leave two rows of teeth marks. However, ...


3

If someone is seriously hurt deep in a cave, and only hours away from dying, chances are they are going to die. You have a map, but do you know how to read it? Cave maps don't read like a topo map, because they aren't mapping a planar surface. Caves can be just as much vertical as they are horizontal, with caverns zig-zagging and crossing over and under ...


3

Control the bleeding with elevation and tight bandaging. Clean the wound with alcohol (I've also used hand sanitizer). Get medical help for deep lacerations .. or .. Periodically replace the dressings and look for infections (if found, go back to step 2). Very important to make sure the person doing the care has used hand sanitizer or other means to prevent ...


3

Get lucky If you don't know where the exit is, getting out of a cave is a matter of luck. If you have watched T.V. you have seen people using a flame to check for a breeze, but in reality, there is no guarantee that one way or the other will lead to an exit you can use. You might follow the water, but again you have no idea if the water coming in or out ...


2

While the other answers given do include some good advice, there are a few other points worth making. NB I speak as something of an expert, having stuck hooks in myself (unintentionally) several times and having witnessed several other incidents, including a friend putting one point of a large treble through his finger while we were fishing Lake Nasser in ...


2

You can use a heavy duty rain poncho wrapped over tree branches. This site gives a good illustration of how to make one. I've seen this method recommended by outdoor organizations and the US Army. If you have the misfortune to need to use this technique, better to have four litter carriers than two.


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