34

Hot soup mostly, it does depend on the individual diets of the climbers, not everybody eats the same thing, but most carry hot soup with them. Despite the massive amounts of energy needed to summit Everest, the truth is most climbers don't eat much on summit day, and that's simply because they don't have an appetite due to the high elevation. Many climbers ...


22

No one is allowed to just show up at base camp and expect to be able to advance to any of the other camps. First of all, there is a lot of paperwork that must be completed before you're even granted a permit to climb Everest, which includes a letter of recommendation from a national climbing association. The permit to basecamp is only $50.00, but if you ...


20

In 1996, they seemed to enjoy chocolate bars and candies. From some of the accounts of the infamous 1996 season related by the 2015 movie, apart for the classic soup, tea and fluids, we can consider "junk food" on summit day: Matt Dickinson (the other side of Everest) eats Muesli and pistachio nuts. Lou Kasischke (After the wind) was very fond of M&...


17

Yes boiling water at 70oC will burn you. The above chart is for hot water heater settings and burn/scalding. As you can see from the graph being exposed to 70o C water for about half a second is enough to burn your skin. That isn't a long exposure time. As far as the cold and other factors well that just depends on too many variables. The answer is ...


16

Lemon juice and tinned fruit From Tenzing's autobiography Man of Everest We started pitching the highest camp that has ever been made. And it took us almost until it was dark. First we chopped away at the ice to try and make our sleeping-place a little more level. Then we struggled with frozen ropes and canvas, and tied the ropes around the ...


15

It has to go down to all the High-Altitude diets, and not just specific to Mt. Everest. Anywhere above 23,000 feet / 7,000 meters most of the mountaineers lose their appetite to a considerable level. So, at that altitude losing weight is a common observation. Thats where the fats come in picture. Body starts consuming these bodily fats and worst case muscles ...


14

Well, I'll share a list of peaks that are open and people do in India. Uttarakhand state: Panvali Dwaar (6663 m) - Song(RH) - Khati - Dwalio - Phukia - Base Camp - C - I,C - II and summit (Long: 79o57', Lat: 30o17') Nanda Khat (6545m) - Bharari(RH) - Loharkhet - Khati - Dwali(Vill) - Base Camp,C - I,C - II,C - III summit attempt (Long: 79o58', Lat: 30o18') ...


14

I did this trek in early April (of 2004), flying to Lukla and walking to Kala Patar and the base camp. However, I didn't sleep at Gorakshep (the highest point at which it was possible to sleep in a lodge) but at Lobuche (4900 m). I purchased a -10 degrees Celsius (14F) sleeping bag in Kathmandu, which was fine for me. At Lobuche my water bottle froze during ...


13

This post provides a YDS rating for various sections of the Everest climb. Recall that the YDS rating system begins at class 1 for easy trail walking, class 4 is like climbing a ladder, and technical climbing begins at class 5. Overall, it seems like the climb up Everest is not very technical--it's mainly the altitude and weather that make it so difficult. ...


12

I assume you're talking about the south base camp in Nepal, which is the more popular destination. The typical route gains about 8000 feet over 40+ miles, which is really quite gentle, although the net effect of all that altitude is significant. It's mostly class 1 with some class 2 (rough trail/scrambling), so no technical skills required. Supplies/...


11

The first reason is weight, you can hardly carry yourself up Everest let alone extra oxygen bottles, in fact as soon as they empty a bottle a lot of people drop it on the ground as litter because they can't be bothered to carry the extra weight any more. Weight is the number one reason garbage gets left on everest, because people either won't or literally ...


11

While Patrick's answer here clears many of the points, I would like to make up a few points about warm-up routines and acclimatization. A few points may sound very specific to you and not really generic at all. For us, Indians, that weather is not really what you can call normal and pleasant, with the gradual (if it is) gain in altitude adding to a wee bit ...


10

The answer is yes. But not for everyone. The first two people on record to die on Everest were George Mallory and Andrew Irvine. There's speculation that they may have even summited the Mountain, making them the first team ever to conquer the tallest mountain in the world, and almost 30 years before Sir Edmund Hillary and Tensing Norgay made their ...


9

Lenin Peak is another likely candidate. Just quoting from the wiki page (that looks heavily copied from summitpost). It is considered one of the easiest 7,000 m peaks in the world to climb and it has by far the most ascents of any 7,000 m or higher peak on Earth, with every year seeing hundreds of climbers make their way to the summit. and The ...


8

The problem with rescuing someone in the death zone is, well, that it is the death zone. Supplemental oxygen helps, but the decreased pressure is also problematic. If you are injured or sick, you are not going to get better no matter what type of supplies could be hauled up to you. The only way to rescue someone is to get them down, and get them down quickly....


8

I can only partially answer this question, and my information is not particularly up-to-date, but I've contacted a friend who has been there recently and added his answers to my own. In April 2004 I flew Kathmandu-Lukla, and returned via bus from Jiri to Kathmandu. I remember the flight costing about a hundred dollars. My friend flew in September 2013, and ...


7

I would add that I did Jiri to EBC in Feb 1992 (the coldest time of year?) and found it to be cold (4 season sleeping bag) but manageable. I am just re-reading my diary from the time - and the noticeable thing is that the cold is mentioned quite a lot - but my 'whining about the cold' is ALWAYS related to wind. So make sure you have windproof gear handy to ...


7

The short answer to your question is yes you can get a stove to light and cook your egg on the top of Everest if you really wanted to do it. Backpacking stoves are pressurized All of the backpacking stoves I've used use some sort of pressurized fuel system. This means that the ambient air pressure isn't going to affect the flow of the fuel. Fuel Boiling ...


6

For butane/isobutane/propane canisters, the stove design, affecting the temperature in the canister or liquid feed pipe, and the boiling point of the gas mixture would matter. At very low temperatures even the O ring rubber type would matter as some types go less rubbery and do not seal properly. For instance, if the temperature of an upright butane ...


6

You have a wonderful goal! It is good that you understand it can take time to work up to this trip. I recommend that you think in terms of several years, not decades, because (a) after 50, most people don't get better physically, they just manage not to get worse and (b) unexpected things happen. As for what kind of physical and spiritual training ...


5

This sort of hard decision happens at lower elevations. In some ways harder: The Death Zone scenarios obliges you to abandon the victim to save the rest of the party. At lower elevations it's often less clearcut. The difference usually amounts to better weather shorter distances to more moderate terrain. easier access to machine assistance (skidoo, ...


4

According to this webpage, the trail starts at 15,000 feet and includes a 18,000 ft pass. My recommendation would be to do some aerobic exercises, to prepare for the lower oxygen levels. I sure that any trip would include an acclimatization phase, but being prepared would certainly help. Also, if you have the opportunity to train at higher elevations in ...


4

Assuming weather conditions were perfect, and the condition you were treating was mostly oedema, then a hot air balloon with a hyperbaric chamber may be possible. However, conditions are rarely perfect, and the risk, and expense would simply be too much to keep such a toy on constant standby near the major climbs. The manoeuvrability of such a vehicle ...


3

If you can get to the person, a rescue operation is 90% done. A danger zone is a danger zone because spotting someone is often impossible, let alone getting near them. I never heard of anyone passing near someone that was dying and ignoring it, even in the massive scam Everest is. Edit: I didn't know about the case of David Sharp, mentioned in the comments....


1

As a preliminary peak for Everest, there are several mountains ranging from 6000-8000m peaks. Climbing 6000m peak (Island Peak or Lobuche East) is basically included these days on the Everest expedition itinerary as a part of acclimatization. However, climbing one 8000m peak such as (Mt. Manaslu or Mt.Chooyu) will be greatly beneficial before attempting ...


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