68

Other people have addressed several concerns that I would have bringing a young child into the mountains during the winter. One concern that I haven't seen addressed is; what if something happens to you because the average 6 year old is going to be entirely dependent on you. If you become compromised for any reason the child more than likely isn't going to ...


47

If the snow was hard packed enough that a self arrest is not possible, and there are no intermediate anchors, then if one person falls, they can take the whole team down with them. If that was the case then what they should have done is to have the first person place anchors as they went up, either snow pickets or ice screws depending on the conditions. The ...


40

Yes, you absolutely should rescue the climber when the situation allows. The reason that matters most is suspension trauma: Prolonged motionless hanging in a harness can lead to loss of consciousness and eventually even death. Of course you say the victim is conscious, so he might be able to move or even install a foot-loop to transition weight to his legs. ...


34

Hot soup mostly, it does depend on the individual diets of the climbers, not everybody eats the same thing, but most carry hot soup with them. Despite the massive amounts of energy needed to summit Everest, the truth is most climbers don't eat much on summit day, and that's simply because they don't have an appetite due to the high elevation. Many climbers ...


34

TLDR: Yes, it can happen at that altitude, but the odds are extremely low. Long answer High-altitude cerebral edema has happened at lower than 10,000 ft. The condition is seldom seen below 3,000 metres (9,800 ft),2 but in some rare cases it has developed as low as 2,500 metres (8,200 ft). Source To give an idea of how rare those rare cases are, consider ...


29

I personally had a similar sort of a question when I first went through similar kind of stats about these mountains. Getting introduced to these stats is different than totally understanding the mountain and the Pandora's box it opens. For getting acquainted with the reasons for so many failed attempts, one needs to read tactical data and expedition reports. ...


29

Isolation and prominence are the two key criteria to classify a peak as an independent mountain. To understand the meaning I like the visualization from the German Wiki where "Dominanz" means isolation and "Schartenhöhe" means prominence: Isolation is the distance to the next point with the same height (radius) of a higher mountain. So the nearest ...


27

I do not have much alpine experience Climbing the Breithorn in the winter is a much different matter than in the spring or summer. Any 4,000 meter peak in the alps is subject to arctic weather conditions with high winds and temperatures far below freezing. There is also going to be very deep snow, so unless you know how to ski or snowshoe, you are going to ...


25

You know that there is a lot of snow already in those heights in Austria? Even in 1500m people not used to it will get problems. Please have a look at webcams and detailed descriptions of the route you are trying to hike. And check out the conditions! I was never on that mountain but it seems there are exposed ridges and even wire-assured parts on the route ...


24

First of all: Walking a glacier contains some serious risks and roping up is not enough to cover that risks, but also knowledge of crevasse rescue is needed. Therefore I strongly recommend a glacier course where all those things are taught. Now for some basic things to consider when walking a glacier as a roped party: When walking a glacier, one normally ...


24

Due to the small volume of the body - risk of rapid hypothermia in children is very high. Do not risk it in the winter.


24

Both words refer to the same topography, which is a saddle point. The land goes up in two opposite directions, and down in the two other opposite directions. To me at least, a col is just this basic topography. However, a pass implies the saddle point is a reasonable travel connection between the two downhill directions. Since the two uphill directions ...


24

The Großglockner is one of the most popular high peaks in the Alps. This means that in the summit area, especially between the Kleinglockner and the Großglockner there is a lot of traffic in both directions with little room to pass. To allow for a belay, the belay bars (in the second picture) have been placed. One would just wrap the rope around those bars ...


23

Fastpacking is lightweight or ultralight mountain travel with the aim of covering big distances over extended trips. Base weights would typically range between 8lbs-15lbs (3.5-7kg) or even less, so packs should be light enough to enable at least some of the trail to be covered with a running gait. There's a lot of emphasis on using your skills and experience ...


22

The most common options coming to my mind are: Securing from anchors and building e.g. one rope-party with 2 and one with 3 members This is slow but very safe. You do it in steep and/or difficult terrain. Moving continuously being roped together while the first uses gear Using e.g. a tibloc or you can use rocks to let the rope move behind them (with ...


21

One method is to build a brake out of carabiners. The minimum equipment for this is three oval biners plus a locking biner, and the diagrams below show how to construct the system with only this many biners. However, this setup doesn't give much friction, especially with a thin rope, and normally people use at least one more oval, as described in the text ...


21

I was thinking about this question while rappelling over an overhang this evening with my little girl and payed attention to exactly what I do: Plant your feet on the edge of the overhang, keep your legs straight, and let the rope through your descender until your body has cleared the roof. Think of the wall as flat ground, you want your body as ...


21

Additionally to @imsodins brilliant answer, I'd say the same applies to almost any mountain rescue situation: if you are able to contribute to the situation while maintaining your own safety, do it (and if you're not able, stay out of the way of the rescue team) securing your position takes precedence over the next steps (you don't want to be the next task ...


20

In 1996, they seemed to enjoy chocolate bars and candies. From some of the accounts of the infamous 1996 season related by the 2015 movie, apart for the classic soup, tea and fluids, we can consider "junk food" on summit day: Matt Dickinson (the other side of Everest) eats Muesli and pistachio nuts. Lou Kasischke (After the wind) was very fond of M&...


20

imsodin's explanation (it's a heavy object you bury in the ground, like a dead body) seems very plausible. Just to add some history to it, here's the earliest use of the term listed in the Oxford English Dictionary: a1852 W. T. Spurdens Forby's Vocab. E. Anglia (1858) III. 12 Deadman, a piece of timber buried in the earth, to secure posts, or other ...


20

I've taught some classes for a mountaineering club, and the following sequence is based loosely on what we do. (1) Learn traditional map-reading and navigational skills. Move beyond attempting to navigate the way most people do these days, by peering at the screen of a cell phone. Get in the habit of printing out a paper topo map for any new route you're ...


20

In short - No, do not take your 6 y.o. daughter on that mountain in winter in one week's time. There'll be plenty of opportunities for parent-daughter bonding in the future in less extreme and more pleasant circumstances. My reasons: One of the cardinal rules in mountaineering is to usually travel in fours, minimum of three if all in the party have lots ...


20

I'll try to give a fairly generic answer to this broad question... Avoid Dangers This is obvious really, but first and foremost you'll want to avoid any kind of routes which lead you close to dangers. What's dangerous and what isn't and which levels of danger you'll be prepared to accept will depend highly on your skill level, your environments/weather, ...


20

The answer is that it depends on the moisture held in the air moist air changes at a rate of 3° Fahrenheit per 1000 ft of vertical / 0.6° Celsius per 100m. dry air changes at a rate of 5.4° Fahrenheit per 1000 ft of vertical / 1° Celsius per 100m. As moist air rises, it cools with height at a rate of 3°F per 1,000 feet (not nearly as ...


20

TLDR: Because its much harder that way and the extra altitude of the Himalayas makes it that much more difficult. Alpine style refers to mountaineering in a self-sufficient manner, thereby carrying all of one's food, shelter, equipment, etc. as one climbs, as opposed to expedition style (or siege style) mountaineering which involves setting up a fixed ...


20

Yes, snowshoes can be very useful when mountaineering. The ideal conditions for their use are lots of snow and fairly gentle slopes. The deeper the snow, the greater the advantage snowshoes have over just boots. The steeper the slopes, however, the more difficult and dangerous it becomes using snowshoes -- ascending or descending. Be prepared to take them ...


19

You would use the rope doubled, so that when you are at the length of it, you anchor off and release one end of the doubled rope so you can pull it through the anchor. Then re-anchor at your current position in order to continue your descent.


19

There are many types of specialized harnesses, including harnesses for sport, trad, and mountaineering. Personally I use the same harness for trad and mountaineering, and it works fine. For trad climbing, you want four gear loops. Since people don't carry such heavy racks for sport and mountaineering, some harnesses specialized for those activities may not ...


19

This is a very complicated topic, and you can take an entire course where you learn and practice the techniques. Reading an answer on SE is not going to be enough. You need to practice. The following is just an outline. There is an entire chapter in Freedom of the Hills on glacier travel and crevasse rescue. The first step is always going to be to construct ...


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