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30

Is it "severely dangerous"? Maybe Is there risk? Absolutely I'm going to say first off that you seem like you have little to no hiking/outdoor experience, and whatever answers me or other users give you here are NOT a substitute to knowing and understanding the hazards and risks yourself. Hiking is usually a pretty safe activity, but you can easily get ...


14

About the only real danger of the ones you mentioned is a scorpion under a rock you just picked up. They do hide in crevasses under rocks during the day. Just be aware that there might be a scorpion under any rock, and pick it up accordingly. For example, if it's a fist-sized rock, don't pick it up by wrapping your hand around it. If in doubt, kick the ...


9

A quick note that if you ever hike in areas where you might wander into any place that may have been a bombing range, please familiarize yourself with the concept of unexploded ordinance: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unexploded_ordnance That’s probably a battery. Some have a metal post and shell that might outlast other components after a few years / ...


8

These are mining claim markers that mark the edges of the claim. The ones in the picture are legal, because the tops are capped. If the tops were not capped, it would be legal to pull them out and set them on the ground. 8.  After November 1, 2011, any durable plastic pipe that is not removed pursuant to subsection 7 may be removed and placed on the ground ...


7

Last summer I did a yo-yo of both the Toyaibe Crest and the Ruby mountains while also summitting both Mt Wheeler and Boundary Peak. The mountains aren’t particularly dangerous, other than the big summits I did there really wasn’t any times where I was particularly concerned. Snakes are less of a concern in the alpine areas and the other wild animals get ...


6

That is a camel spider, they became famous on social media when the US invaded Iraq in the middle east where they are more common, and the troops started taking pictures and sending them home. Apparently they are also found in the SW USA, which I didn't know. Good news is they aren't venomous, they just have really nasty jaws that can rip and shred flesh. ...


6

Because they like it. It feels good, so they do it. Many mammals roll in sand or dirt, presumably to keep parasites away or to help dry themselves after exercise or becoming wet. A sand roll, which is a stall or yard covered with deep sand, is traditionally included as part of stable complexes for use by racehorses after exercise.[20] Dust bathing has been ...


4

I think the answer by mmcc is mostly correct. They are probably parts of an old electrical device battery. But the round case is not steel. Steel (ferrous metals) rust (oxidize) like the narrow strap with a rusty brown color. Non-ferrous metals oxidize in different ways. The green inside is a typical oxidation color of copper. The canister is some type ...


2

I have observed these, I have seen dogs, goats, cats, wolves, etc scraping the ground. In some cases they sat onto it. In some cases they didn't. Following are cases where it makes sense: Sharpening their hooves - Thats one way they sharpen their hooves periodically. I have seen our dog and cat scraping the ground, possibly with an intention to make the ...


1

That looks like a Vinegaroon (not a camel spider), at least that's what my dad called them. Common in the desert SW. They pinch and bite but I don't think they are venomous. They do spray vinegar at you, hence the name.


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