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52

There are several reasons, though not all of them would apply for one's usual holiday trip. Remaining unseen Obviously, during night its dark and this gives you a fair bit of cover if you want to remain unseen. This reason for traveling at night is common for many hunters in the animal kingdom (and sometimes also their prey), has been used by humans in ...


37

When I was a boy I learned about a tribe of natives (Lipan Apache) that had an initiation into manhood which involved plucking a hair from the tail of a live deer. These people had developed a mode of stealth that allowed them to walk right up to deer–head on–without the deer sensing their presence or noticing their advance. I adopted the technique for ...


31

The main advantages are: You don't need sunscreen Even with a full moon, the night sky is awesome Things look (and sound) weirdly and wonderfully different in moonlight In summer, the temperature will be much more conducive to brisk hiking than during the heat of the day The OP did not ask about disadvantages, but the main disadvantage is #3 -- that ...


26

You need to know if you are in Northern Hemisphere or in Southern Hemisphere or nearby the Equator. If you are in Northern Hemisphere: First locate the Polaris. Its the last star in The Ursa Minor. I've had trouble in locating it sometimes. Many people do. So, if you are in such a situation, try locating The Ursa Major. The Ursa Major is located just to ...


23

What you will want to do is to find which way a star is moving. The way to do this, is to line up two objects pointing towards where the star is currently at, like so. Then wait 15-20 minutes for the star to move and compare its new position to the old one marked by your sticks. As illustrated above the correlation between its movement and the direction ...


22

Wolves and coyotes are crepuscular, not nocturnal. That is, they hunt in the early morning and in the evening, not at night.


17

For night trekking, I use a headlamp. Couple of reasons: Keeps your hands free. (Useful when you are walking up steep slopes) No worry of dropping them flashlight (Had happened to me once where my flashlight rolled down the hill) Advantages of a flashlight over a headlamp: More powerful and directional. (No need to strain your head in weird angles to get ...


16

First - do everything to prevent getting a wet bag! A wet sleeping bag must be a nightmare - the best solution is to make sure this never happens to you again! Before I use a new shelter somewhere remote I would wait for bad weather and test it out in an exposed location where I can retreat easily if things go pear-shaped. I always inspect my shelter ...


15

Adding this mainly because it's a different kind of approach. The other ones are usually more practical, but this is an alternative that does not require remembering any constellations. If you have a rough idea and a camera, you can take a long exposure (30s minimum, more is better) and check which star in photo is the only one that does not move / stays a ...


15

There are 3 main types of night vision equipment; Image intensification This is the type most commonly used by the military. It works by effectively amplifying the available light and may work in visible or IR spectrum or both and works in a similar way to a TV camera. These systems rely on some light e.g. from stars or moon being available and won't work ...


14

I played pickup this way in college for several years. Like some of the others suggested, an LED disc works well (green works far better than red or blue in my experience). We also used glow sticks, although we generally only used them on the arms because it was cheaper, an they tended to get in the way for running when on the legs. The biggest thing I ...


14

The simplest way (assuming you are in the Northern hemisphere) is to first find the Great Bear / Ursa Major / the Big Dipper / The Plough, and use the two end stars as a sight line. The star in Ursa Minor that they point to is Polaris, which is currently our Pole Star. This does change, but not noticeably in our lifetimes. (from http://www.themightyeagle....


14

Don't, unless you know the route very well and are sure the rivers can pose no danger. Travel the day before so you arrive to the trailhead before it gets dark, then spend the night at the trailhead. Big river crossings at night are too dangerous. A headlight will only do so much as the light will just reflect off the surface. You won't be able to tell ...


12

Why all the lights? you could solve everything you need and have a REALLY cool event with nothing but a lot of glow sticks :) Make people wear different colors for different teams, then one each side of the body for arms, hips and legs (so 6 glow sticks per person). That should be more than enough for a good time out there.


12

There are a few, many of which are in common with simply hiking at night, but some are specific to geocaching. Firstly, the old scouts saying of be prepared! Make sure your torches, whether hand held or head, are properly charged (or you have spare batteries for them) as you don't want to get caught out in the dark without a light source. This also goes for ...


12

General advice for climbing at night: Don't do it if you are new to climbing. Avoid it, even if you are not new to climbing. Be prepared for it on long routes, even when you are not expecting to be climbing at night. Most of my night-climbing came about unplanned. Make sure you can do everything involved in climbing with your eyes closed. In the shower. (...


11

Better sights In some situations, there might be some beautiful things that can only be seen during the night. This includes Northern lights (Aurora Borealis), but also some places might brag about the great view of the night sky or moon. Of course you can always watch during the night even if not hiking, but since you have to sleep you'd appreciate it for ...


10

Route finding might be a problem: If the approach is not obvious (from what I read about Snake Dike, it isn't), you could waste much time blundering there, looking for cairns and what not. You could miss an important belay point on the route. You could wander off to another (harder) route in the middle; it happens to me all the time during the day, so I ...


10

There are usually some light sources, even on a moonless night there are stars. Even with thin cloud cover it is not that bad, it blocks some light but also reflects some. Only a really overcast night is going to be "completely dark", and that's not that common. Animals that are active at dawn/dusk/night have generally adapted to make do with ...


9

With ultimate specifically, traditional outdoor lighting methods won't work well. Flashlights are right-out, because you need both hands to play. Headlamps are a bad idea because you'll blind your teammates. Lanterns don't cast light far enough to illuminate a whole field. Glowsticks work well for illuminating players, as pointed out above. For ...


9

Oh goodness, this is a terrible struggle in caves especially, because there is no air current and the breath just lingers forever in front of your face. It's especially bad when I'm trying to film the cave with my GoPro, and have a persistent cloud looming in front of my head cam. There are three things you can do while wearing a headlamp: Consciously blow ...


9

The relevant law is the Gesetz zur Erhaltung des Waldes und zur Förderung der Forstwirtschaft. In § 14 Betreten des Waldes (entering the forest) it says (bolded by me): (1) Das Betreten des Waldes zum Zwecke der Erholung ist gestattet. Das Radfahren, das Fahren mit Krankenfahrstühlen und das Reiten im Walde ist nur auf Straßen und Wegen gestattet. Die ...


9

I tried out both options when I started night hiking and can share the following observations: Flashlights are generally more powerful and directional - you can point a beam of light much further away; useful if you are trying to see further around you, for example to determine where each fork in the trail leads. Headlamps are less powerful for the same ...


9

I'm going to assume that you're too deep into the bush to bail and get back to civilization, and that your bag is all that's standing between you and hypothermia. In this situation, you have to get your bag dry. First, prevent yourself from getting any wetter. You have rain gear, that is good. Get into dry clothes, put your rain gear on, and stay active so ...


8

Just found this and thought it rather interesting and adds just a little something more to the already great answers posted. The following is from the Flashlight University: LED Colors and Uses. White: Great for all around, every day illumination. Red (630 nm): Red LEDs are do not appear as bright to the human eye as white LEDs. If your eyes are ...


8

TLDR: It's the same in both hemispheres. To keep the explanation simple consider someone driving south at night across the equator in Africa . The person sees a star ahead and it's moving to the right. As the person crosses the equator it will still be moving to the right, not suddenly stop and start going to the left. I think where people get confused is ...


7

I have used both for night hiking, and I like a headlamp way better. The main reasons are that it leaves the hands free, and the light is aiming roughly in the direction I'm looking. I made my own headlamp with 4 white LEDs in series: This seems to be a good brightness for hiking and seeing the ground in front of you. Having it built into a hat is also ...


7

I don't believe such an easy method exists you can keep in your head and calculate. The position of the moon relative to you depends on accurate knowledge of the phase of the moon, time of day, and latitude and longitude of where you are, and those interact in a nonlinear manner. Your original claim isn't even true in all places. The moons rotation is ...


7

Depends on your headlamp. I use a Petzl Ultra Vario headlamp for caving that can cast a beam 200m, so when I've got that on I can see pretty much the same as climbing during the day. I've climbed at night before, there wasn't any real significant difference. We happened to be climbing during a full moon as well, and as soon as that moon came out it was ...


7

There are a couple of things you will want to do. Headlamps are essential as you will want the full use of both of your arms. The darkness will make it more difficult, mostly because you be able to see much less. The darkness can also mess with your judgement of how far things are. In mountainous areas, the stream levels will usually go up later in the day ...


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