Hot answers tagged

9

In short, just the name. Fjord is of Norse origin, loch of Gaelic. They are the same feature, formed when glaciers debouch into the sea. In both countries, you'll find varying scales, from a few hundred metres in width to several kilometres.


7

In the more densely populated areas of Central Europe these long distance trails just seamlessly blend in with regional or local trails, so while the whole, say, 2690 km of the EB Eisenach - Budapest may not be well-known, e.g. its westernmost 170 km is the Rennsteig, a very famous regional trail in Germany which is moreover very old: it used to be a ...


6

Buy a hiking map once there, they should be available in bookshops and tourist offices. The map shows marked trails which are walkable without the need for special equipment. The paths can be rocky, slippery and steep in places though. For example on Moskenesoya there are trails from Fredvang to romantic secluded beaches and a trail from Moskenes to the ...


5

None. Bears and wolves are no safety concern in Norway and Finland. Both are shy and, since they are not used to human contact (opposite to say, some places in the US where bears are used to people) will try to avoid all human interaction. This will mean that they'll go out of their way to avoid you and very likely you won't see any. If you ever do catch a ...


5

There are two conflicting accounts of the route of the E1 through Børgefjell. After coming back from Børgefjell, I believe that the route through Børgefjell is probably the toughest part of the E1, and a good candidate for the toughest part of any European long-distance hiking route. Within Børgefjell, there are no markers, few trails, few bridges, and ...


4

The Tromsø region does not lack woodlands. If you go out into Bardu into spectacular Dividalen National Park, there are plenty of woodlands. However, mountain birch forests in winter are nothing like dense forests in Poland or other midlatitude regions. The trees are 3–7 metre high and lots of light passes through, so in most forests your opportunities ...


4

Fjellstyrene.no might lead you to the right fjellstyre and their website with more information about huts here is also a good start for finding open huts.. https://utelivet.wordpress.com/bubasen/ [Edit] Still not being a full overview, there is another site from Statskog, the state owned land and forest enterprise, that has published a PDF OVERVIEW with ...


4

the question is a bit old (2012) but there might be people still searching for an answer to : where and how to walk in the Lofoten Island? I asked myself the same question and I found a web site (in English and in French) which is dedicated to this subject. You will find many pages with day-walks description, maps, pictures, and free-downladable gps tracks. ...


3

There are also excellent hiking books that describe hikes along with their difficulty. Even if the description may take some work to decipher (although with a dictionary and some time you should be able to), the route sketches, estimate for duration and difficulty can be quite helpful. I recommend På tur i Lofoten which contains a whopping 193 descriptions ...


3

I'd say borders are the main reason such trails aren't famous. Well nowadays with free movement within EU, borders aren't an issue. But that is just quite recent history. Also lack of common language can discourage people from hiking across country borders. Before Euro also lack of common currency. Individual countries themselves are not that big (compared ...


2

Your sleeping bag & tent setup looks ok but I would be a bit worried with the matress. 1.3R value is a bit limited and as the ground in Northern Norway can be pretty wet/cold in Troms, I would suggest you to buy another matress, some cheap Thermarest Z-lite or a Klymit Static V insulated from Massdrop (what I've been using during my whole year in Norway ...


2

Based on my experience Most of the coldness I experienced while camping came from the ground. My advice is to take an extra ensolite pad with you. Best one of those with those metallic surface on one side. Just place it under your sleeping pad. If size is also a concern, there are some models which can be folded to the size of a DIN A4 sheet. And maybe just ...


1

I can only speak from my own experience with equipment that I can only qualitatively compare with yours. At the upper end of the range you quote (in the fifties F, 10+ degrees C), you will be warm (unless you are wet). So obviously, it is the lower end of the range that is of concern. We do our backpacking with a three-season tent, with rainfly; your ...


1

I was about to write a long essay on how strange the Norwegian rules regarding rights-of-every-man and the department of safety and readiness but I realized you are just asking where to find the information. This is usually not a judgement that is made at the nation level - it is made by each municipality or city council. So you'll normally expect to find ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible