33

The term you're looking for is "low-residue diet" or "low-residue meal" (for some reason, the medical community tends to avoid the term "poop" in their technical terminology). Simply googling on those terms will get you a lot of good advice; WebMD and Wikipedia are good starting points. A low residue diet is a diet designed to reduce the frequency and ...


24

I am pretty certain that this is what you are looking for, Image Source Two tablespoons (32g) of the stuff has 8g of protein and 16g of fat. Source It easy to carry, does not require refrigeration or cooking. Typically I eat it straight out of the jar with a spoon and can go through one of the jars pictured in about a week. Yes, it does get old after a ...


22

In a survival situation without water you will die in days and without food you will die in weeks. So in general, there is no need to eat in a survival situation. That said, the quick burst of energy you can gain from eating a sugary snack could make all the difference. There is probably little harm eating a little after one day without water. Your body ...


15

I think the problem is the generalization. It depends on the food. Watermelon is surely not comparable to trail mix. Also I have my doubts about the idea that berries are a problem and a mash to squeeze out the water is better than eating them because of the skins and seeds... that makes no sense. The way your intestine absorbs water is different through its ...


14

Would it make sense to carry soda instead of water in respect to save weight (you can carry less food because you have energy in your "water")? No, for a variety of reasons (leaving out, as you say "other health related topics"): Sugar, powdered Gatorade, and many other water additives all weigh less than soda. Soda comes in cans/bottles which you'll have ...


12

what are you recommendations for protein or fat rich foods using traditional camping methods Focusing on the fat part, the following are all practical sources: olive oil, or any other vegetable oil, which you can add to rice or pasta, dip crackers in etc. nuts ghee hard cheeses string cheese (if you can find some that's not nonfat) salami, pepperoni, slim ...


9

Eat. Because metabolic water: Metabolic water refers to water created inside a living organism through their metabolism, by oxidizing energy-containing substances in their food. Animal metabolism produces about 110 grams of water per 100 grams of fat, 41.3 grams of water per 100g of protein and 55 grams of water per 100g of starch. Metabolic water (...


9

There are many sources of vitamin C in the wild. Some of the tricks that I have come across is to know how to extract it in ways that do not destroy the vitamin C. Berries are great in vitamin C and may be eaten raw. However there are a great variety of other sources of vitamin C in the wild. Let’s take a look at a few wild sources of vitamin C from ...


8

Reaching for my Kindle copy of House and Johnston's book*, I find the statement: "In an ideal world we’d eat seventy grams of carbohydrate per hour to replace the roughly 400–800 calories per hour we’re burning while climbing." Obviously at 4 calories/gram, 70g of carbs will not supply 400-800 calories. The reasoning for this amount becomes more clear ...


7

Let's say we have a liter of coke and liter of water. Both of them weight nearly the same. However, the coke contains a lot of calories whereas the water contains none. The law of conservation of mass, tells us that the total mass/weight of a solution is equal to the sum of the masses of the solute and solvent. So if you add 100 g of sugar (the solute) to ...


7

For a day hike, yes, it could make sense, if it's the type of day hike where you need to carry water rather than drinking from sources along the way. It's really just a matter of what you enjoy. If you enjoy drinking soda, bring soda. Let's say we have a liter of coke and liter of water. Both of them weight nearly the same. However, the coke contains a ...


7

MREs. Not poop free, but if you start eating it a couple of days before the trek, you'll be amazed of how constipated you'll become. Sometimes I think this is by design, as a soldier doing his business on a bush with his pants down is an almost comical definition of a highly vulnerable target.


6

Energy bars (and protein bars, power bars, etc) are typically dehydrated in order to improve shelf life as well as increase the ratio of calories/nutrients to weight. Their longevity and energy per ounce make them ideal foods for hikers and mountaineers, but your body will require some additional water to metabolize the nutrients and ingredients. However, ...


3

First, it makes a big difference if you can bring a water filter with you and take advantage of verified sources of water, and by verified sources I mean water that you are 99.5% sure is going to be there when you are. You can't point out a stream on an old map and rely on it, this is your life source we're talking about. If you want to prepare yourself for ...


3

When you have no water to drink: You can eat foods high in water and low in proteins, such as fruits, vegetables and milk, which usually contain more than 90% of water. Do not eat foods high in proteins, such as meat, fish, eggs, cheese, nuts and seeds. PROTEIN IS DEHYDRATING Every gram of protein you eat results in loss of 8 mL of water with urine (...


2

I'll be brief. 100 grams of sugar and 900g of water when mixed still 100g of sugar plus 900g of water, not a miracle of 100g sugar and 1000g water concoction. Mass preserving law, considering almost no nuclear or chemical reaction inside your Cola (I'm not so sure about this hell mixture). So, if you want fast calories at hike, take carbohydrates as the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible