10

Paddles board sizing are relative to what you wish to do with said board. Short boards 8' or under are generally used for children. Medium boards 9' to probably around 12' are good for calm lakes / rivers and for some fun in the surf. Long boards, 12' or more are for the more serious journeys, touring or racing. They are faster and track straighter. ...


8

Out on a calm lake with minimal adverse conditions, you're not going to notice any real difference as long as you're above the absolute baseline in equipment. As with most sports equipment the difference in quality only shows when things start to become challenging and you're describing the baseline situation for a paddleboard. What you'll notice more is ...


8

Are you surfing Are you competing Do you have a car with roofracks or a van The key to the development of the inflatable boards was to make the experience more accessible. Red Paddle Co who (as far as I'm aware) developed the first of the modern inflatable boards have a simple principle of expanding the market as much as possible and making the sport as ...


6

An answer from the paddle board side. I've seen paddle boards up to 400lb among the casually available, generally among the longer (and wider) of the selections, like 12-14 feet or more. With some looking online, I found one that is rated to 450, another for 430, intended for tandem paddle boarding. One more was rated to 700. There are also group paddle ...


5

Things you should get Thinner: This is a big one with the better iSUPs, the cheaper boards can be nearly twice the thickness and more. Being closer to the water will improve your stability and control and generally improve the experience. Better edges: This is a side effect of being thinner, and will give you better control. Hard boards of course have the ...


5

If you goal is muscle exercise, a stand up paddle board may not be the best choice. I stand up and paddle all the time in my 17 foot coleman canoe. I use the same 5 foot paddle sitting or standing. When standing the physics of applying pressure to the water with the paddle means you can not apply as much force. When sitting you have a much lower center ...


5

Paddle size is unsurprisingly related to rider height. While different people will vary by a little in their recommendation there are three general categories of usage that will determine the amount to add to your height: General flatwater, surfing, and racing. I've included advice from Tower and Aquabound (two respected paddle makers) for each category. You'...


4

Pull the leash to get the board back to you. This is one of the safety fundamentals for paddleboards, have a leash, use the leash. When you fall off the board you pull the leash to bring the board back to you and climb on. Actually swimming is made even more awkward by having to hold on to the paddle while doing it. Use the leash.


3

The advice I normally give is that you should stand with your hand up in a relatively relaxed manner (not reaching as high as you can), and the paddle should come up to your wrist on the raised arm. Since most paddles you'll encounter are adjustable for length you can tweak it for comfort but it gives a good starting value, and nobody is going to be ...


3

This will depend a lot on the fit and type of dry suit, and how much air it holds. Ideally there should not be much air inside. Too much will make it difficult to do any stroke. You should be able to perform a basic crawl, albeit with low arms, even with some air in the suit, but if there is a lot of air, you are better off rolling onto your back and using ...


3

Great question I would think through in your specific case the following steps: store it (at home or at a public boat ramp if available) transport it (if it’s not already at the launch point)—-to the car, into/onto the car, to the launch point prepare it for use paddle it transport it again prepare it for storage occasional repair and maintenance If ...


2

I'm a kayaker rather than a paddleboarder so I'm a little less exposed, but also 7C seems toasty warm compared to the temperatures we're sometimes out in. Breaking the ice in winter is reasonably common. The fundamental difference with gearing up for hiking is that you're not as likely to fall in the water while hiking, so gear adds up differently. Thermal ...


2

You seem to need what is fairly standard in kayaking and canoeing: a "buoyant heaving line". That's the official term (in Canada) for what is commonly called a "throw rope". It is almost always made of polypropylene, because that floats well; is 15m to 20m long; is 6mm to 9mm in diameter; is brightly colored; and usually comes loosely ...


1

Broadly speaking, your steps seem perfectly reasonable. Completing them will leave you with a board with protection and strength. Your question at the bottom is entirely up to you - if you are likely to bash the nose into rocks or while transporting, then adding more layers will add protection, but personally I wouldn't worry too much. They are pretty robust....


1

How to dry a waterproof glove The basic strategy is to start the drying by manually remove as much water as possible, then finish by air drying. Grab the glove by the tips of the fingers, with the palm and cuff hanging down from your hand. Use your other hand to grab the glove just below your first hand, squeeze and draw your hand all the way down to the ...


1

You should be "burping" your drysuit to remove excess air. From NRS: You want to evacuate, or “burp,” excess air from the suit. A puffy suit is cumbersome when paddling and can be dangerous if you were to get caught in a hole during a swim. One way to do this is to hold the neck gasket open with your fingers, then squat and scrunch your body, ...


1

Don't forget a hat! The key item that I see missing from other answers is a neoprene hat. Much of your heat loss will be through the top of your head. A neoprene hat will significantly reduce that heat loss. It also will not get damaged if you wind up in the water. The great thing about a hat is that you can easily take it off if you are too warm. Neoprene ...


1

7C grad water is quite cold. You can make an experiment and jump in the jacket into water and check how it feel afterwards. Most likely you'll find out it's very miserable. If you assume falling into water is something that could happen to you (I assume you do) you have basically 2 options. A wet suit, in cold conditions with addition of the ice vest, and a ...


1

Inflatable SUPs of similar lengths to yours seem to have around 250-600L of volume, mostly on the lower end of that scale. @Separatix points out that 600L is "a real anomaly" in volume. (Source Source Source) I would not suggest using a tire inflator, as these are meant for low volume, high pressure applications. You want to inflate your SUP to something ...


1

What will you be using your paddle board for? That's the number 1 factor in choosing a paddle board. Secondly, do you have the storage at home and in your car for a hard board? Generally, I would say inflatable boards are best for more people unless you're looking for extreme performance (paddle board racing, long-distance paddling, etc. Also, many ...


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