5

Things you should get Thinner: This is a big one with the better iSUPs, the cheaper boards can be nearly twice the thickness and more. Being closer to the water will improve your stability and control and generally improve the experience. Better edges: This is a side effect of being thinner, and will give you better control. Hard boards of course have the ...


4

Pull the leash to get the board back to you. This is one of the safety fundamentals for paddleboards, have a leash, use the leash. When you fall off the board you pull the leash to bring the board back to you and climb on. Actually swimming is made even more awkward by having to hold on to the paddle while doing it. Use the leash.


3

This will depend a lot on the fit and type of dry suit, and how much air it holds. Ideally there should not be much air inside. Too much will make it difficult to do any stroke. You should be able to perform a basic crawl, albeit with low arms, even with some air in the suit, but if there is a lot of air, you are better off rolling onto your back and using ...


2

I'm a kayaker rather than a paddleboarder so I'm a little less exposed, but also 7C seems toasty warm compared to the temperatures we're sometimes out in. Breaking the ice in winter is reasonably common. The fundamental difference with gearing up for hiking is that you're not as likely to fall in the water while hiking, so gear adds up differently. Thermal ...


2

You seem to need what is fairly standard in kayaking and canoeing: a "buoyant heaving line". That's the official term (in Canada) for what is commonly called a "throw rope". It is almost always made of polypropylene, because that floats well; is 15m to 20m long; is 6mm to 9mm in diameter; is brightly colored; and usually comes loosely ...


1

Broadly speaking, your steps seem perfectly reasonable. Completing them will leave you with a board with protection and strength. Your question at the bottom is entirely up to you - if you are likely to bash the nose into rocks or while transporting, then adding more layers will add protection, but personally I wouldn't worry too much. They are pretty robust....


1

How to dry a waterproof glove The basic strategy is to start the drying by manually remove as much water as possible, then finish by air drying. Grab the glove by the tips of the fingers, with the palm and cuff hanging down from your hand. Use your other hand to grab the glove just below your first hand, squeeze and draw your hand all the way down to the ...


1

You should be "burping" your drysuit to remove excess air. From NRS: You want to evacuate, or “burp,” excess air from the suit. A puffy suit is cumbersome when paddling and can be dangerous if you were to get caught in a hole during a swim. One way to do this is to hold the neck gasket open with your fingers, then squat and scrunch your body, ...


1

Don't forget a hat! The key item that I see missing from other answers is a neoprene hat. Much of your heat loss will be through the top of your head. A neoprene hat will significantly reduce that heat loss. It also will not get damaged if you wind up in the water. The great thing about a hat is that you can easily take it off if you are too warm. Neoprene ...


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