24

Upsides It "looks cool" (to some) Cordage (but arguably useless as you have noted) Downsides Poor grip (compared to leather and manufactured alternatives) More likely to cause blisters Less durable, requires more maintenance PITA to clean if it gets messy/dirty/sweaty Once you unwrap the cord to use it, your knife has even worse grip. IMO - It's a ...


16

Masons Line Paracord's biggest selling point is that it's strong enough to hold your body weight. That's great and all, but honestly, it's very rare to get caught in a situation where you're forced to use a rappel. The most common situation is when parachuters get caught in trees, but in those situations, you already have a bunch of lengths of paracord ...


15

Paracord Better strength*/diameter ratio. 550lb paracord is 5/32" (4mm) in diameter generally. Twisted poly of a comparable strength is around 3/16" (4.75mm). So the paracord will pack smaller. More versatile. You can easily divide it into multiple ropes. Its form also makes it much easier to braid than twisted poly if you need to make a stronger rope. ...


14

The whole point of the paracord bracelets is having paracord on your person when you need it. Paracord has many, many applications in survival situations. You can use it like you said as backup boot lace, you can tie it into a sling for hunting: You can use it to attach your knife to a pole to make a spear: Make a bow for hunting or to start a fire: Lash ...


13

You'll need to test to be sure, but it will lose quite a bit of strength. When I sailed, I was taught that you lose as much as 80% strength by tying a knot. So if you have 500 lb paracord, by this estimate it could support about 100 pounds reliably when knotted. The weakening is at the point of the knot, so multiple knots doesn't further decrease the ...


13

Some of it may well be historical - while there are a lot of generic hardware store type things that "do the job" out there now, I'm willing to bet that a few decades ago this wasn't the case. However, I'd still say that unless you're just doing light hiking / camping where it's never going to be stretched much, it's still worth getting: Overall, it's ...


12

One of my tents has fluorescent paracord - it doesn't glow in the dark, but is incredibly bright and can easily be seen. We also attach some of it as guidelines when pitched in wilder areas to help the kids find their way to the tents in the dark. It works well - typically the only people who trip over them are adults...if they have had one two many glasses ...


12

I recommend highly reflective line. Many manufacturers make this. I have had excellent results with Kelty Triptease. One 50' line cuts down to easily make 4 guylines for a tent. It is highly reflective and even a little light will make it really stand out at night. You may also consider reflective markers like those made by MSR. These will also make ...


12

You cannot tell by simple observation if a cord is as strong as it should be. Even if the cord was originally manufactured to the correct specification it may become invisibly damaged by chemical exposure. See this report for an analysis of such a case that fortunately did not result in serious injury. Do not trust cord unless you know both its source and ...


10

I think it can be a matter of personal taste, however: Some people craft their own knifes, and using a paracord wrap as handle is easy to do, and easy to redo. There are some more and some less good looking wrap styles - again, personal taste. This also applies when it comes to knifes you buy in a store. Some may like the paracord wrap just as you like ...


10

Climbing ropes are meant to hold falls, and to absorb the shock of the fall itself through stretching (they can stretch up to 30% of their length during a severe fall so to reduce the impact force on the climber). There's no need for a climbing rope to hold more than it does, because any more force during a fall and the body of the falling climber would be ...


9

Nylon is great for climbing ropes, but it's sub-optimal for lashing and repair since it stretches so much under load. If you are going to carry string, carry polyester braided cord. It's just as strong but stretches much less. This is all I could find on the web quickly: Cabela's Northern Flight™ Braided Decoy Cord It's 2mm cord with a 450lb breaking ...


9

As Mr. Wizard mentioned, you cannot tell if it can be trusted or not. This is why its good to keep an equipment log noting when important stuff like rope that you depend on is used and anything that happens to it. However, if you are given some paracord sealed from a manufacturer and you are curious if it is the Mil-spec stuff or not then there are a few ...


9

The strength is dependent mainly on the angle between the two ropes form, on which the hammock is hung, and the weight you want the hammock to support. For a traditional hammock the angles of the ropes (measured to the horizontal) are about A=30° (just an estimate). Lets assume we want to design the system for a person weighing W=200lbs. Then we can derive ...


8

Even the “regular” paracord would be set ablaze if you put it close to a fire / heat source :) It’s a nylon / polyester after all… In my opinion, such gimmick paracords are not more dangerous than a normal one. Unless that tinder is a strand of black powder fuse :) UPDATE I reckon that extra strand is some kind of waxed cotton or something. If that is the ...


8

It looks like for mil spec (military specification) 550 parachute cord, The paracord sheath is rated at about 300-pounds 14 inner strings, each of which has a rating of about 17.5 pounds 7 strands made up of two strings each for a rating of 35 pounds. Source Basically, if the cord in the question was milspec than each strand would be rated to ...


8

TL;DR: Death trap? No. Should you be cautious? At least as cautious as you would be with normal tinder. Think of it this way: Pile of loose jute twine, seem dangerous? No. People who use it for arts & crafts probably don't even realize its fire potential. Pile of loose paracord. Dangerous? No. Tinder can sit out without worry. Paracord can sit out ...


7

As a knife maker I'm not overly fond of paracord wrapped handles. That said I've done a few and they have there place. I do impregnate the wrap with epoxy, both for durability and for moister protection of the steel under the wrap. It makes for a sure grip, so sure that if used hard and long it will raise blisters. But for a quick task in adverse ...


6

Parachute cord aka paracord comes in basically 6 major types based on weight limits of 95 lbs to 750 lbs. Type 3 has a weight limit of 550 lbs and is referred to as 550 paracord. Usually when someone says paracord they are referring to 550 paracord. For bear bags and tying tarps and tents and securing gear 550 paracord works perfectly well and is cheap and ...


6

A single strand of 550 paracord will hold body weight, so when you say, "load bearing" are you implying more than body weight? If not, then I think it's a non-issue, especially if you're weaving or knitting verses knotting; knots significantly decrease the breaking strength of ropes and cord, bending: not as much. Paracord will be more than suitable for ...


5

I've recently got into hammock camping and roping it to a tree is a bit more complicated than it first sounds so please bear with me You need something to wrap around the tree to protect it from holding your weight, these are unsurprisingly called tree straps - mine are made out of seat belt material. You need something adjustable from the tree straps to ...


5

I come form a coal mining town, in the mines they call the change rooms the 'dry', because mines can be very wet places and the 'dry' is where you'd dry out your clothes. Before they started putting ventilated lockers in the drys, they used to hang their clothes on hooks under baskets that they'd raise up to the ceiling with a rope and pulley system to where ...


5

I can think of multiple options for solving this problem. Tensionless Hitch i.e. wrap the rope around the beam enough times that it doesn't slip and unwrap to lower. Loop a sling over the beam, connect the ends with a carabiner and then counterbalance the items. Tie one strand of parachute cord to the beam, and then attach the items to that strand with ...


5

Fluorescent or glow in the dark paracord would be the way to go - I haven't tried the latter, but from looking at its colour it may blend in more in the daytime than fluorescent stuff, even if it stands out more at night. I'm happy to be proved wrong of course! However, it seems here the question alludes to kids tripping over the lines, which isn't ...


4

I propose using whatever cord is strong enough, inexpensive, and compact, then marking it with fluorescent surveyor's tape. Another option is adding your own glow paint as needed.


4

Here are four variations on the bowline, in words and graphics. Note that all four of them are here left not fully dressed (not tightened). In each case, the standing part should be pulled, or at least held firm, to tighten the knot. If, instead, you pull on the working end without holding the standing part -- and this seems to be your problem -- the knot ...


3

If I slice across your knit rope, in a flat cut, how many strands would I cut. Looks like 8. Now use the best lies you can find about the strength reduction in a bend in kernmantle rope. My recollection is that it is about 80% of the original strength. (60% in a stranded rope) (The core fibers in a kernmantle rope have room to slip, so all the strain ...


3

The bowline is an interesting example of a knot which fails if dressed wrongly - even if it has been tied correctly. If you tighten a bowline by pulling on the working end, or by pulling the loop apart, it can invert to a running noose. Tighten it by pulling the standing end to avoid this. Here is a loose bowline: Pulling the working end (and the right-hand ...


2

Since 550 "paracord" is not a life line (unless actually used as shroud lines or similar), I think price takes precedence, assuming the cord is up to a basic standard of size and construction. If you are willing to buy in bulk you can get it for about 5¢ per foot.


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