26

For tents that erect outer first, pitching in the rain is no different to any other time, just don't leave the dry inner out in the rain while putting the outer up. The outer will get wet on both sides anyway. To make this easier a bit of forward planning is useful, like pack the inner and outer separately so that you can just leave the inner in the car ...


24

There are all kinds of people who put up the fly first, then crouch under it putting up the inside. It's generally a very unpleasant experience from all I have heard, what with the crouching, crawling, and being rained on at least while getting the fly up. I handle it completely differently, because I have a free standing tent. On arrival at a site the very ...


11

Assuming you don't have an outer first tent pitching in the rain comes down to planning and practice. It is actually possible to stay fairly dry if you're organised. There is no sure fire method but there are a few tricks which can help you keep the inner dry. Don't wrap the tent poles up inside the tent, this will force you to unwrap the tent while it's ...


11

The outside of a tent is designed to get wet, the key trick is to keep everything else dry. You will want to pitch the outer first and only then add the inner. The other answer has covered that well. Some more general tips though is to have a look at the base of your inner tent and see how waterproof it is. A lot of ground sheets are not waterproof at all. ...


8

Firstly, if possible, wait a while. Find somewhere to shelter out of the rain, and wait to see if the rain stops. For typical UK summer weather, most heavy rain is only short showers. So it will probably stop raining (or at least ease off) in 10 minutes or so. If its not going to stop raining, you can unpack your tent while under shelter. Then sort out ...


8

In addition to the other answers, if you expect heavy rain (I'm also heading for Snowdonia this weekend...) be careful about the location you choose as well. Avoid places near rivers or streams but also avoid hollows in the ground or the bottom of slopes. Your groundsheet may be waterproof but its sides only extend upwards for a certain length and it is ...


8

With luck and planning I would assume in mountainous/timbered areas you would be able to setup your tarp so one of the open sides of your tent were mostly/partially blocked by a tree/rock/bush/etc. which would solve roughly half of your problem. After that it is about accepting the limitations of your tarp tent, or deciding that you want more reliable ...


7

One last tip, if you don't get everything just right, carry a pack towel or other microfibre super absorbent towel to get the inside as dry as possible before putting gear inside.


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