23

These are not exactly the seeds, but the hull of the seeds of the horse chestnut. Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Aesculus_hippocastanum_fruit.jpg


11

If you're identifying a totally unfamiliar plant in the field, then typically you consult a field guide or botany textbook that has a key. These books can be broad or specific. For instance, I have one that's a pocket guide to conifers, and another that's a guide to Sierra wildflowers. They can also be designed for a technical audience or for laypeople. ...


10

The previous answers (1,2(now deleted)), unfortunately, exhibit why a simple google search doesn't always work. Two seemingly experienced SE users coming to two different conclusions. So is this an elderberry or is it pokeweed? This is where the extra work on the back end (and, honestly, front end) pays off. An initial google image search shouldn't be a ...


9

I think your plant is a pokeweed, Phytolacca americana. I have a lot in my yard in Massachusetts. Our sister site, Gardening and Landscaping has a number of questions about pokeweed. I think this has the best pictures and identification. To answer your question though, the simplest thing for me is to do an internet search. Choose words that characterize ...


7

The "reeds" (or whatever they are) are very tall. Taller than phragmites... I find this statement a little hard to swallow, considering Phragmites australis subsp. australis can reach heights as high as 5m (16 ft). So my first question would be, "Are you sure what you're looking at isn't a Phragmite?" Phragmites australis: From the pictures provided, ...


6

I have no knowledge of the plant, but I did find some interesting information, which I hope will help you. Western Poison Oak, also called Pacific Poison Oak, is common in your region. Poison oak, also known as Western poison oak (Toxicodendron diversilobum), is native to western North America with a distribution extending from British Columbia to the ...


5

This seems to be Carissa Macrocarpa, commonly known as Natal plum, or another related species. If one searches for common plants in Cyprus, it does come up easily. I am guessing that the climate in Cyprus is very similar to its native south african Eastern Cape and that's why it's been introduced as a landscaping plant. But just as with the introduced and ...


5

The thick veins make me believe it is Comfrey. Your image is of a young plant so it is hard to tell for sure. It is and has been an important part of herbal treatments and gardening. It is used across the world.


4

Looks like Anemone occidentalis Native to far western North America including British Columbia to California and Montana, it is found growing in gravelly soils on slopes and in moist meadows.


3

A bit more methodical approach to IDing this plant: Opposite leaves + a corymb of multiple dark-colored, round drupes is very indicative of the genus Viburnum. If we check BONAP and Ontario Trees & shrubs, we can see that only a handful of Viburnum species are found in Ontario. From Ontario Trees & shrubs: Viburnum alnifolium (Hobblebush) ...


3

Disclaimer: I may be wrong, don't eat things that you are not 100% sure are edible!!! This is a Nannyberry. It is edible. More information here. Wikipedia Link for convenience. Fun fact: The English translation of its German name is "Canadian Snowball" (Kanadischer Schneeball).


2

These are not blueberry - the leaves would be smooth and the fruits would be covered in a pale whiteish wax bloom. Although they do look very similar to blueberry in the washed fruit form as you might buy at the supermarket. However, good news - these are most likely Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia). Also known as Saskatoon (after which the Canadian ...


2

I love Seek, by iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/seek_app Besides Flora: Fauna and Fungi are part of the detection possibilities. The answers are very detailed. Although there is room for improvement, the gamified approach is lots of fun while maintaining the scientific correctness. Furthermore, the iNaturalist community is a great place ...


2

Not sure where you are, but Alan Weakley et al. have developed a downloadable flora app available through the Apple AppStore called FloraQuest, which covers most of the Eastern US at this point. Screenshot from floraquest.com From ResearchGate: FloraQuest connects you with everything you need to know about naturally occurring plants in the Southeast ...


1

Google Lens is Google's technology for "searching what you see", including plants and animal. Since it relies on Google's service, doesn't work offline. Identify plants and animals Find out what plant is in your friend's apartment, or what kind of dog you saw in the park. It's available on: Google Lens standalone app (Android 6.0+) Google Assistant ...


1

It seems to be elderberry (or Sambucus). Most of the species are edible according to that Wikipedia article.


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