9

The boat itself is effectively unsinkable, it's a sealed plastic box. The hatches normally have bulkheads separating them from the rest of the boat. If the hatch sections become swamped it's not going to sink the boat, just make it very difficult to handle. It should be noted that most properly set up kayaks are "unsinkable". All kayaks should have ...


9

The main issue with repairing plastic hulls is that is that most adhesives don't bond very well to the plastic. For temporary repairs duct tape is the way to go. Its quite adhesive and waterproof. If the hole is too big use the duct tape to secure something else waterproof (e.g plyboard or plastic) in place. If possible try and do both inside and out. If ...


7

I've seen people use a soldering iron and a piece kf abs plastic to repair tears in the hull but the best answer is short and simple to use for small holes: epoxy putty. just follow instructions on the packaging, fill the hole with a small (few mm) overlap inside and out and if you want sand down when hard and paint.


6

It's quite common to melt in some plastic - but be sure to get the same as the boat is made of. Most are PE so try to get some of that -- avoid ABS. Kits are available (random web example). The general recommendation among people I know who've done this is to use a hot air gun rather than a naked flame. You can also overfill a touch and smooth down later....


5

It sounds like you have oil canning. It's a standard problem with plastic kayaks, usually caused by excessive tension in straps when loading onto roof bars or long term storage on bars. Various solutions exist, mostly they involve heating the affected area and putting pressure on the inside to restore the shape. You can use a heat lamp or a bright sunny day ...


4

Known as "oil canning" this is a common problem with plastic kayaks caused by long term storage or tight loading straps on roof bars. Luckily you have a minor case and since this isn't a performance boat, the effect is entirely cosmetic. However it can be restored with the application of heat and pressure. The best heat source is a hot sunny day. ...


4

As long as it still flexes you're good to go. Part of the strength of polyethylene kayaks is in their flexibility, apart from colour loss, the most significant aspect of sun damage to the plastics is that they become brittle. If pressing on the larger flatter sections causes it to flex elastically then the sun damage is not yet significant. This is more ...


3

For from upto small leak holes to upto coin-sized holes, You can possibly use a Duct tape on the both sides. One more thing to add between the Duct Tape's point of contact is a filler like Some local Epoxy Compound product, or worst case a Chewing Gum (Chewed one :D). For a crack, you might just get it fixed by a Duct Tape.


3

Unless it’s so asymmetrical that it’s noticably making you turn I’d strongly suggest not worrying about it. At recreational kayak speeds I doubt it’s adding measurable drag, especially with a rockered hull like that which is made to behave itself in a variety of water not set flat-water speed records. The great joy in a boat like that is you just paddle it ...


2

In regards to seaworthiness of SOT vs Sit In kayaks, it depends... Typically a SOT, because you are sitting on top of a air cavity of some depth, will have a higher center of gravity and in that sense be more tippy than Sit inside. Initially the SOT will feel more stable because its like a big surfboard compared to a sit inside sea kayak, which is narrower, ...


2

No they are not unsinkable. There is a class of boats where the hull material itself is buoyant, like a surfboard. These sit on types are not of this caliber. They are plastic boats with a sealed (to varying degrees) hull which traps air creating buoyancy. Any break in the seal; either by way of an open drain plug, storage hatch ajar (if part of the buoyant ...


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