8

As noted, the key is removing it quickly. If you like to carry around dishsoap, that will work great. However if you do not regularly carry that around, abrasives are a good alternative. I've effectively used the sand at the bottom of a small waterfall to remove the oils and of the entire hiking group, all of whom realized too late what we'd walked ...


7

Poison oak's "poison" is an oil-based substance; therefore any oil-removing soap will do the trick. Dish soap is a low-cost and easily available substance for cleaning poison oak from skin. This study found that: Dish soap was significantly better than no treatment. Dish soap was not significantly different from two other products (Tecnu, which is much more ...


6

I have no knowledge of the plant, but I did find some interesting information, which I hope will help you. Western Poison Oak, also called Pacific Poison Oak, is common in your region. Poison oak, also known as Western poison oak (Toxicodendron diversilobum), is native to western North America with a distribution extending from British Columbia to the Baja ...


3

I make my own laundry soap. I just found out that fels naptha soap found at walmart in the laundry isle is the best to use for the oils left on material items. Try it it works great and i save tons of money. Just grate the soap and mix with borax and washing powder. If you like you can also put in crystals. I use purex. 2 tsp in the wash cycle and WOW!


2

According to the American Academy of Dermatology its the same oil in both poison ivy and poison oak along with sumac, What you see and feel on your skin is caused by urushiol (you-ROO-shee-all). Urushiol is the oil in poison ivy, oak, and sumac. You find this oil in all parts of the plants — the leaves, stems, and even the roots. Source So there are a ...


2

Ivory soap (for North American campers)...it's the only one that actually cleans and does not leave any residue (which can hold oils) begins. I don't know what other brands of a similar product there is, but I bet you can find your own if you look for ivory soap on the Internet.


1

I don't know about poison oak, but have lots of experience with posion ivy. I think the irritant in both is similar (urushiol oil, or something like that). This answer applies to poison ivy, which I think transfer to posion oak too. No, ordinary soap does no good against this oil. I have taken a shower with ordinary soap shortly after being exposed to ...


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