29

Don't get wet! No I'm not being facetious, I hike through the rain forests of BC all the time, I've spent days in a row in solid rain while backpacking and setting up camp. Getting wet up here can mean death overnight even in the middle of summer, doesn't matter how hot it gets during the day, temperatures can drop to near zero overnight, if you're wet when ...


28

Invite them both on a day hike. That's a end onto itself, so no need to pretend anything else. You can watch the interaction between #2 and #3, and talk about experiences to find out what #3's qualifications are. If after that you still think #3 is a good fit with you and #2, then suggest to #2 to invite #3 along on your backpacking trip. If he agrees, ...


21

It depends a lot on what exactly you mean by "around there". While there are no real mountains in the immediate area around Prague, you can find a number of great places to hike there. If you a willing to go a bit further, you can find some nice mountains, too. Also, I am not sure if by two day hike you mean a backpacking trip with sleeping outdoors, or if ...


20

I'll try to give a fairly generic answer to this broad question... Avoid Dangers This is obvious really, but first and foremost you'll want to avoid any kind of routes which lead you close to dangers. What's dangerous and what isn't and which levels of danger you'll be prepared to accept will depend highly on your skill level, your environments/weather, ...


18

Hide your pack or move it a bit off the trail. Make sure you do not overdo it and end up not being able to find it back yourself. :-) Although you are in the wood, if you are in a popular area, it is possible that other local visit the same area. I've never heard of people bringing alarms for their bags and don't recommend it. I doubt it will be of any help ...


18

There are few things which may go wrong: Injury. Carry some kind of the shelter. It may take few hours for mountain rescue to get to your group. Tired. Make sure you have alternative shorter and simpler route in your head. Dehydrated. Carry a bit of extra water or a purification tablets to gather water from streams. Scared. Your rope can serve a good ...


18

I think having it vertically using side compression straps or bungees on the rear of the bag effects movement the least (ie not getting caught on stuff). As Kate Gregory mentions the pads are really light and don't affect the balance of the bag too much so I wouldn't worry about that. foam pads like the one you have are also really tough! Unlike an ...


16

Generally the far from the civilization you go, the safer your things are. Thiefs are operating there where people live or where there are a lot of people. Distant rocks, caves etc. are not their target. I have not heard of something being stolen from someone's luggage in mountains, for example. If some point is at least a few km far from the place where ...


16

A rolled up sleeping pad is generally pretty lightweight, meaning the "you could misbalance your pack and strain your back" concern is probably one you can ignore. People try not put them inside because they may not fit, or they may get squashed. If the pads are waterproof, which is common, you really don't need to worry about the pad getting wet from ...


15

The USGS Fort Collins Science Center published the following map of the conterminous United States in 2005: It has been published as a factsheet with a PDF (that can be zoomed for more detail): Watts, R.D., R.W. Compton, J.H. McCammon, C.L. Rich, and S.M. Wright. 2005. Distance to the nearest road in the conterminous United States: U.S. Geological Survey ...


15

The answers you seek are not easily quantifiable - for instance, a very fit experienced hiker might walk 50+ km a day on flat, open (i.e. not brush covered) terrain, but might only do 5-10 (or less) on steep, thickly forested hills. Some people can walk more than 100 km in a day - on urban streets/race tracks, but would be unlikely to sustain this day-after-...


14

I did this trek in early April (of 2004), flying to Lukla and walking to Kala Patar and the base camp. However, I didn't sleep at Gorakshep (the highest point at which it was possible to sleep in a lodge) but at Lobuche (4900 m). I purchased a -10 degrees Celsius (14F) sleeping bag in Kathmandu, which was fine for me. At Lobuche my water bottle froze during ...


13

Time of year is very important Bucks don't keep their antlers year round. They grow towards the fall and drop in earlyish spring. This time of year, if you did not lift the tail and check, it may have been a buck. Outside of mating season, you probably have zero concern. No antlers, no worry. During mating season bucks can be VERY territorial. ...


13

I can not give a lot of information about hitchhiking but have spend a lot of time wildcamping in Europe. Sure most land is privatly owned, and most countries have regulations against it, but in most cases you will be fine and undisturbed if you take some things into account: Try to hide your tent, only set it up right before you want to go sleep. Find a ...


13

TL;DR: Bring a set of clothes that are comfy-when-wet and expect to spend a lot of time in them. Keep a set of dry clothes for in-the-tent-only use. Don't ever let your wet clothes come into contact with your dry clothes, cause now you have a whole lot of damp clothes. I've done a lot of 3-week canoe trips and 3+ day winter hikes at -30 C (-22 F) where ...


13

It depends on your destination. In general I would think of: Preparation organise one or more detailed map(s) of the area to go to check the weather forecast organise your way to your destination and back home (in case you do not start walking at your door). This could include: check public transport and buy tickets check fuel of your car; rent a car; ...


12

I follow a paleotic diet (which is gluten-free) for fairly similar reasons. I will give you some of my recommendations; I have tried them all myself except for the hard boiled eggs: Beef jerky/pemiccan: it is very nutritious. It's my number 1 recommendation for food on the trail (regardless of whether you have celiac disease or not). You can make it ...


12

I feel only qualified to answer the first portion of your question: When you are in a rural area, just ask if someone lets you set up camp on their property. Farmers often don't mind. Whenever I had the chance to do it this way I did. I sleep a lot sounder not thinking about police officers waking me up at 6AM and you are interacting with the local ...


12

For every item, I weigh up the regularity of use, vs the urgency of use. For example, my kettle and mug and lunch are always right at the top. My medkit, raincoat, light jersey, headlamp and pocket knife are in the side pockets or top pocket. Anything I will only use at camp is at the bottom (so generally, my camp clothing, sleeping stuff, toiletries, etc) ...


12

I have always viewed packing of backpack in terms of: Ease of access. Distribution of weight to prevent unwanted strain. Distribution of weight is a very important aspect that you have to consider while trekking for a longer duration. Ideally, the heavier things should be closer to your body and the lighter ones away from you. The logic being, the center ...


12

A trek group should have a Leader who walks in front who leads the trail/route/climb, sometimes cleaning the route or navigating the route. I believe that will be you. Then the second most important person is the Back Lead, who is the last head you have, who makes sure that the pace of the group is maintained and adapted as per the slowest member. You'll ...


12

You will likely find topo maps as the best starting point. Find a route that avoids impassible features, like cliffs or high rivers, and sticks to easier terrain like snowfields (depending on the season and weather conditions) and avoiding thick forests. You may also want to try to find guidebooks or trip reports as they may help you find the best route to ...


11

Here's one data point, also based on the Grand Canyon. I'm a 40 year old male, of average fitness and slightly overweight (5'10", 215 lbs.), and ascending the Grand Canyon (4320', ~1300 m) took me almost exactly one day. By contrast, the descent took me 3 hours. (The rule of thumb at the Grand Canyon is that every hour down takes two hours up.) Later ...


11

How much water you need depends on how big you are, how fit you are, where you are and what you're doing. For example, on Mount Everest, the average person needs to drink 4-5L of water each day just so that their body can function properly. You lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. If you're a big guy that's out of shape, ...


11

IMHO, up to a certain level in mountaineering, friends that you make in mountains or at a base camp are likely to be good/close friends for life. So, If I were the guy with the lesser experience in mountaineering and being set up in a meeting for an approval sort of a thing from a veteran, that might go wrong, because the veteran guy on the other end can ...


11

My two concerns for trekking in wet weather are safety and comfort. The safety issue here is primarily hypothermia, which can be a real risk even in the upper 40s or lower 50s (F), if you're wet enough and out for a long period. Definitely something to be aware of. But even if you're warm enough to be safe, being soaking wet for a week just plain sucks- you'...


10

First, sorry to hear the diagnosis, but you are not alone. I've shopped out many a trip for gluten-free clients, and, fortunately, it is surprisingly easy to replace just about every back-country meal** with a gluten free alternative. Quinoa. Corn. Rice. Potato. Soy... there are lots of substitutes. Most large grocery stores in the US are getting better ...


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