25

You probably should not use it any more. Old ropes seem to be surprisingly strong. A German mountaineering magazine made tests with old ropes. Of 14 tested ropes, 10 would still have been strong enough to lead on them without risk. However, these were unused or only little used ropes. The results may differ for ropes that have been used very often or have ...


11

No, it’s not worth the risk. Ropes aren’t that expensive and if it breaks you could hurt yourself.


8

Ascending a fixed rope using an ATC guide in lead mode is totally valid, but it is not the "quickest" method (IMHO). Usually what is taught in basic climbing and self rescue courses is to ascend with two prusik loops: One for you foot, and one for your weight. Ascending with an ATC is ok because it is more "fail proof", though. The reason I mentioned using ...


5

As you are looking to rappel for fun, you should find a place better suited for it. As you mentioned, the anchors are not well situated for an easy rappel. If you want to rappel off that cliff, just set the anchor off the trees and and use a static line running over the edge so you can use do a straight simple setup. If somehow I was forced into this ...


5

Don't extend your rappel too far If your extended brake device gets stuck above the ledge, you probably extended it too far. This might also lead to problems if you have to pass a knot or otherwise need to reach up to your device. Tie up your extension sling to get a length that works. Rappell over the ledge, don't crawl Another thing that might give you ...


4

Strictly speaking, the system you propose (fix each strand of the rope to one anchor, rappel with the same device) is not fully redundant as you still have the device, carabiner and your harness as single points of failure. If you disregard that point and simply want redundancy against rope failure, then, yes, fixing the strands to their own anchors is more ...


4

What you are looking for is a knot that, Is easy to tie and check that you did it properly. Big enough it won't go through the belay device. Won't come undone. That gives you a number of options which depending on the person you may remember one knot more than the next. Double overhand (classic stopper knot). Triple overhand (classic stopper knot). Figure ...


3

Whatever you do, you will need to take off the load from the tuber in locking mode. So I'd use the same technique as when going over a knot (well there's probably more than one technique for that, but this is the one I know and use (luckily for training only till now)), just adapted to the ascending setup you are in: Take a cordelette and make a prusik (or ...


1

Break it down into a passing-a-knot problem: Set up and lock off your (extended) rappel system in a safe place, and then use The Rope to do the rappelling job you were going to do with the awkward-to-release PAS. For example, pre-set and lock off the ATC to a comfortable distance below the foot-anchors, then put the end of The Rope through the higher anchor/...


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